Vitamin K Important For Eye Health Too

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Jan 15, 2019.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2013
    Messages:
    17,190
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    USA / Europe
    In addition to its role in bone, brain, and endocrine health now we can add eyes to the list of tissues/organs that may benefit from vitamin K as well. Unfortunately, most studies are still trying to study vitamin K from the point of view of osteocalcin and carboxylation, which only explains a small portion of its effects. Its role as a quinone that can fill in for CoQ10 in respiration when there is CoQ10 deficiency or some step of the ETC is not working properly, likely explains most of the beneficial effects of vitamin K.

    Inactive matrix Gla protein is a novel circulating biomarker predicting retinal arteriolar narrowing in humans
    "...Active matrix Gla protein (MGP), a potent inhibitor of calcification in large arteries, protects against macrovascular complications. Recent studies suggested that active MGP helps maintaining the integrity of the renal and myocardial microcirculation, but its role in preserving the retinal microcirculation remains unknown. In 935 randomly recruited Flemish participants (mean age, 40.9 years; 50.3% women), we measured plasma desphospho-uncarboxylated MGP (dp–ucMGP), a marker of poor vitamin K status using an ELISA-based assay at baseline (1996–2010) and retinal microvascular diameters using IVAN software (Vasculomatic ala Nicola, version 1.1) including the central retinal arteriolar (CRAE) and venular (CRVE) equivalent and the arteriole-to-venule ratio (AVR) at follow-up (2008–2015). CRAE (P = 0.005) and AVR (P = 0.080) at follow-up decreased across tertiles of the dp–ucMGP distribution. In unadjusted models, for a doubling of dp–ucMGP at baseline, CRAE and AVR at follow-up respectively decreased by 1.40 µm (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.32 to 2.48; P = 0.011) and 0.006 (CI, 0.001 to 0.011; P = 0.016). In multivariable-adjusted models accounting for sex, baseline characteristics and follow-up duration, these estimates were −1.03 µm (CI, −1.96 to −0.11; P = 0.028) and −0.007 (CI, −0.011 to −0.002; P = 0.007). Additional adjustment for changes from baseline to follow-up in major baseline characteristics yielded as estimates −0.91 µm (CI, −1.82 to −0.01; P = 0.048) and −0.006 (95% CI, −0.011 to −0.001; P = 0.014), respectively. Circulating inactive dp–ucMGP is a long-term predictor of smaller retinal arteriolar diameter in the general population. Our observations highlight the possibility that vitamin K supplementation might promote retinal health."

    Vitamin K, known for its arterial health benefits, may benefit the eyes as well
    "...“MGP is abundantly expressed in the eye, where it takes part in preserving the structural integrity of the trabecular meshwork, the sclera, and the retinal ganglion cells,” they wrote, and considering that activation of MGP requires vitamin K, this led them to hypothesize a link between vitamin K intake and eye health. Participants in the study were part of a longitudinal cohort called FLEMENGHO, which started recruitment in 1985. As a longitudinal population study, the researchers’ collected measurements at the beginning of recruitment, and then collect them again after a certain amount of time. They then draw information from patterns observed in the changes. This study focused on collecting health data on Belgium’s Dutch-speaking population, and thus, they argued,“ our current findings in white Flemish cannot be extrapolated to other ethnicities.”
     
  2. Vinero

    Vinero Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,435
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Netherlands
    This means that blood thinners like Warfarin which are vitamin K antagonists might be damaging to the eye. Also excessive aspirin and antibiotic usage without supplementing vitamin K might damage the eye.
    Also the study says Vitamin K might prevent glaucoma. Glaucoma is one of the known side effects of cortisol based therapies, so everyone with an inflammatory and/or autoimmune disease which gets treated with prednisone, dexamethasone, triamcinolone, etc is at risk for getting glaucoma.
    If I'm reading the study correctly then Vitamin K also protects against atherosclerosis, since Matrix Gla Protein is activated by Vitamin K and lowers calcification in the arteries.
     
  3. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2013
    Messages:
    17,190
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    USA / Europe
    Yes, warfarin is well-known to increase risk of cataracts and glaucoma. Cortisol calcifies the arteries by activating the MR, so the effects you report also make sense. Since niacinamide also protects from glaucoma I wonder it is also has anti-calcification effects or if the benefit is due to better metabolism as I suspect is partly the case for vitamin K as well...
    Cortisol And Aldosterone Cause Vascular Calcification
    Vitamin B3/NAD Fully Prevents The Development Of Glaucoma In Mice And Halts Its Progression If Alrea

    The first study above suggests pregenolone/progesterone may also provide benefit for glaucoma and other calcification disorders. Some people reported pregnenolone greatly improves their vision quality, so maybe that's the reason.
     
  4. bzmazu

    bzmazu Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2015
    Messages:
    1,363
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Corozal, Belize
    My recent eye exam was stellar....I've only had one eye for all my 73 years and noticed it was getting "tired"...I do every thing I can for my precious sight...I think my 1000mg of B3 and 5+mgs of K2 and preg/progest have all definitely helped protect/improve my sight.
     
  5. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2013
    Messages:
    17,190
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    USA / Europe
    Glad to hear it Mr. John. What does the doctor think of the B3/K2 regimen? Did he/she dismiss it as placebo effect?
     
  6. schultz

    schultz Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2014
    Messages:
    2,380
    Neat, I did not know this! I'll have to do some pubmed reading. My mom is always going on about glaucoma because she's scared I am at risk because it "runs in the family", which I guess means like 2 old relatives had it. You tend to view disease a bit differently from a Peat perspective, or maybe it's because I am only in my 30's and view disease from a young perspective...
     
  7. bzmazu

    bzmazu Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2015
    Messages:
    1,363
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Corozal, Belize
    She didn't know what to say...so she said nothing. I think I irritated another doc ...doctors here are like god...you don't question and you certainly don't know anything...and there is no getting a second opinion...that is a huge insult...that's medicine in Belize. My tackling the leukemia on my own went over like a lead balloon.
     
  8. Regina

    Regina Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2016
    Messages:
    2,835
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Chicago
    Your garden must love having you. You found your own answer: "doubt everything...find your own light...."
     
  9. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2013
    Messages:
    17,190
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    USA / Europe
    Here is one link.
    Long term warfarin associated with bilateral blindness in a patient with atrial fibrillation and macular degeneration
     
  10. magnesiumania

    magnesiumania Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2018
    Messages:
    438
    Gender:
    Male
    So whats the best way to get enough vit K, i dont like supplements...
     
  11. tankasnowgod

    tankasnowgod Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2014
    Messages:
    4,236
    Gender:
    Male
    Just because you don't like them doesn't mean that they aren't effective. Most people would probably benefit from K2 supplementation, even if just short term. Personally, I will supplement K2 for life.

    Kate Rheume Bleu's book "Vitamin K2 and the Calcium Paradox" lists the best food sources.
     
  12. magnesiumania

    magnesiumania Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2018
    Messages:
    438
    Gender:
    Male
    Yes and thats not why i dont like them. I dislike supplements because i wont ever be sure they are entirly safe. Makes sense? Some supplements ive found to be effective and they have become part of my supplement regimen.
     
  13. Nebula

    Nebula Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2018
    Messages:
    202
    Gender:
    Male
    Probably boiled dark leafy greens. I don’t see why K1 wouldn’t be metabolized to K2 unless metabolism is seriously damaged. I consider generous amounts of boiled greens as a natural source for a lot of the minerals and vitamins that people tend to think they need to supplement. It make sense to me since mammals have the longest history of eating leaves and grasses for most of their evolution. Other primates also consume generous amounts of greens throughout their evolution. Seems to me it’s part of proper human nutrition.
     
Loading...