Slipped Cervical Discs

Discussion in 'Messtafarian' started by messtafarian, Jan 25, 2015.

  1. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    I know someone who had something like this and the doctor was of the opinion that surgery was absolutely necessary and urgent. Rounds of massage have dismissed all symptoms for several years.
     
  2. OP
    messtafarian

    messtafarian Member

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    I've read all kinds of things by now. Some people do not do surgery and regret it, some people do surgery and regret it, others do not do surgery and are glad, others do surgery, and are glad.

    I think it really all depends on where you are on the desperation scale. Personally, I can see the approach of Very Desperate from here. Your spine is one of those things you'd pretty much do anything to fix.
     
  3. tara

    tara Member

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    Yes.
    If it were me, I'd probably favour trying the interventions that have a low risk of sudden death or tetraplegia first, and give them a bit of time, before going with more drastic/risky measures. But we all have somewhat different risk assessment and risk tolerance, and you make your own judgments.
     
  4. SQu

    SQu Member

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    Still reading - this is from 'water: swelling, tension, pain, fatigue ,ageing':

    "Some of the nerve problems associated with hypothyroidism (e.g., carpal tunnel syndrome and "foot drop") are blamed on compression of the nerves, from swelling of surrounding tissues, but the evidence is clear that hypothyroidism causes swelling in the nerve cells themselves. "

    " Hypothyroid nerves are easily fatigued, and fatigued nerves take up a large amount of water. Swelling of the spinal cord is probably responsible for the "spinal stenosis" commonly seen in domestic animals and people; the mobility of intracellular water molecules is distinctly increased in patients with compression of the spinal cord"

    " The hyperhydration of hypothyroidism has been known to cause swelling and softening of cartilage, with deformation of joints, but somehow it has never dawned on surgeons that this process would lead to deformation of intervertebral disks"
     
  5. narouz

    narouz Member

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    mess-
    I would echo those advising the safer and cheaper options first.

    Peat tends to link back pain strongly to the gut.
    That's where I'd look first.
    Well--thyroid of course.

    Sorry if I missed it, but
    have you described how your back/neck problems came about?
    And how's your digestion/elimination?

    Before I had surgery
    personally I would take the antibiotic for 100 days.
    Especially if I had an MRI to identify
    being a good candidate for that study about back pain and antibiotics I mentioned upthread.

    Also, I've just been looking into "rheumatoid arthritis."
    There is an interesting study linking it to gut macrobiome
    and the over-proliferation of a certain bacteria...
    and another study connecting red meat consumption with gut biome with rheumatoid arthritis.
     
  6. narouz

    narouz Member

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    Very intriguing, burt. :)
    When I watched the video
    and saw the many tiny IV needles
    plugged like acupuncture needles
    into that guy's back...
    I wanted that!

    But then I started thinking about Peat describing how back/joint pain is often caused
    by, essentially, waterlogging.
    Edema....

    Maybe the "isotonic salt water" actually causes the vertebrae to took let water loose...?

    Up thread a little a poster cites some cool stuff similarly linking water/joint/back pain.
     
  7. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    Why not start with the less invasive/expensive method, and work your way up from there ?
    Sea water, as Quinton has shown, has incredible properties not understood by science, but proved by human usage.
    It can replace human blood, has the same mineral content of human blood, fights infections, makes babies grow healthy.
    Have a look here: http://oceanplasma.org/
     
  8. OP
    messtafarian

    messtafarian Member

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    So...ok...but what are you suggesting I do?

    Inject myself with seawater?

    I actually live a mile from the ocean at the moment in South Florida, I could go dunk myself in there every morning :).
     
  9. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    You have absolutely nothing to lose, and everything to gain.
    There are trusted french labos selling it ( 25$ for 250ml) i can point you to. You only need someone to make the back injections while you lie still in bed.

    And seriously, swimming in sea water is a known ancient remedy.
    They used to send tuberculosis patients to the beach to improve their illness.
     
  10. OP
    messtafarian

    messtafarian Member

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    Thanks Burtlancast. For now I pick the ocean. I'll go in it instead of it going in me. :)
     
  11. moss

    moss Member

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    Hi messtafarian

    I have read most of this thread, and currently looking for alternative treatment options, other than surgery, for a friend who has a lateral Meniscus tear and was curious about blc’s video link on the subcutaneous injections of isotopic solution. I recall Dr Peat talking about a German treatment in one of the KMUD audios but cannot locate it? He talks about a treatment injecting procaine/anesthetics into or near the injury site for pain relief.
    Came across Neural Prolotherapy, injecting a dextrose solution for pain relief and stopping neurogenic inflammation and thought was interesting.

    http://www.drberghamer.com/neural-prolotherapy/
    http://www.journalofprolotherapy.com/pd ... herapy.pdf
    http://www.journalofprolotherapy.com/pd ... _prolo.pdf

    This may be a little off topic but thought well worth a read FYI, and good luck.
    moss
     
  12. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    One can use too Quinton for the cartilage in the knee ( always subcutaneous, again), but the response rate is much slower than for the vertebral disks.
    The rythm of injections is once per week: for the back, the response is felt after 3-4 weeks, while for the knee, it can take up to one year.

    Have a look too at this Dr Dunn : http://www.iagh.com/
    For the past 20 years, he has patented a method for regrowing good quality cartilage with local growth hormone shots. He uses it mostly for the knee and hip, but vertebral disks can be improved too.
    He was inspired by the disease acromegaly, where pituitary secretion of excess growth hormone causes deformation of joints due to excess cartilage growth.
     
  13. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    Are there clinics that do this in France?
     
  14. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    It's not an accepted treatment, so one needs to take a lot of precautions when administering it.
    There are just individual doctors, no clinics.
     
  15. OP
    messtafarian

    messtafarian Member

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    Thanks for looking into it, moss. Salt and sugar seem to be the key to this, in various forms :)
     
  16. smith

    smith Member

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    I wonder how we could make our own isotonic sea water
     
  17. ddjd

    ddjd Member

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    is it really that cheap?? Quinton is about 20 dollars for a few vials isn't it?
     
  18. Dave Clark

    Dave Clark Member

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    Since seawater is supposed to be 75% magnesium chloride, perhaps using transdermal magnesium oil (magnesium chloride liquid) would help as well.
     
  19. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    Yes, but it's really just diluted sea water, hence the low price...
     
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