Cancer Is A Metabolic Disease, Diet Is Its Drug

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, May 28, 2019.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    This is perhaps the most stunning article to date I have seen in mainstream media (MSM). For more than 100 years the story has always been that cancer is a genetic disease due to mutations that turn cells into rampant killing machines. Now, one of the bastions of MSM - the mighty "Atlantic" - has published an article that reads as if it has been copied straight from one Ray's articles or the forum/blog posts we have been making here. The author is an MD, and this underscores just how big of a shift may be underway in medical thinking. First, the article starts by calling into question the theory that cancer is a genetic disease due to mutations. Instead, it says that cancer is a result of metabolic derangements. In other words, cancer is a metabolic disease! Second, it calls diet a drug! Hippocrates would be proud we finally found some common sense inside us. Third, it mentions specific dietary interventions that can likely treat cancer. Methionine restriction, asparagine restriction, glycine therapy, the importance of histamine in promoting cancer, the possibility that B12 is dangerous in excess, etc are all aspects that Peat has mentioned in his articles and we have posted on this blog. The article even coined a term for such an approach to treating cancer - metabolic therapy. So, it seems the powers that be are finally starting to listen to the "madness" we have been discussing for years. As such, now when you go to your doctor and tell him/her that "diet is a drug" you have some ground to stand on instead of being labelled a lunatic.

    You Can’t ‘Starve’ Cancer, but You Might Help Treat It With Food

    "...Cancer cells grow in distinctive patterns that defy normal limitations. That growth activity requires energy, and so cancer cells metabolize nutrients in different ways from the healthy cells around them. In an attempt to kill the tumor without killing the normally functioning cells, chemotherapy drugs target these pathways inside of cancer cells. This is notoriously difficult, expensive, and prone to toxic side effects that account for much of the suffering associated with the disease."

    "...Now doctors are starting to think more about specific nutrients that feed tumor cells. That is, how what we eat affects how cancers grow—and whether there are ways to potentially “starve” cancer cells without leaving a person undernourished, or even hungry. “For a long time, the prevailing thought was that altered metabolism in cancer cells was the result of genes and mutations that determined metabolism,” says Jason Locasale, a cancer biologist at Duke University. “Now, as we know, it’s a complex interaction of environment and genes, and one of the major factors at play is nutrition.” The importance of nutrition has long been accepted for conditions such as diabetes and hypertension, diagnoses that come with well-known dietary prescriptions. Even the most commonly used drug in type 2 diabetes, metformin, has been found in clinical trials to be inferior to diet and exercise. Cell biologists like Locasale see extending that line of thinking to cancer as a logical step, because at the cellular level, cancer is also a disease of metabolic pathways."

    "...While the sugar-and-insulin angle has shown promise, more of the research has focused on dietary protein—or, specifically, individual amino acids that make up that protein. Studies have shown that the restriction of the amino acids serine and glycine can modulate cancer outcomes. According to a 2018 study in Nature, the chemotherapy drug methotrexate is affected by the amino acid histidine. Another, asparagine, is involved in the progression of breast cancer metastasis."

    "...The most interest has gone to methionine, which is found in high levels in eggsand red meat. In 2018, a review of existing evidence from the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey deemed restricting methionine “a promising anti-tumor strategy.” That promise has also shown itself in brain tumors and melanomas, as the UC San Diego surgeon Robert Hoffman detailed in February. Methionine is made in normal cells—out of homocysteine, folate, and vitamin B12. However, many types of cancer cells lack the enzyme that makes cellular manufacturing of methionine possible. So they require extra methionine from outside the body—via food we eat—for survival. Cut off that supply, and it should help to slow the tumor without starving the person. This month, Locasale and his colleagues at Duke released findings showing that restricting methionine decreased tumor growth in mice and human subjects. Locasale’s particular area of research, known as metabolomics, uses enormous data sets to quantify metabolic activity. This allows the controversial field of nutrition research to operate with new levels of precision, where specific metabolic pathways can be monitored. Most nutrition research relies on self-reported data, in which people who say they eat almonds are found to have lower rates of some sort of cancer, and the best we can do is assume these two things are related. Locasale’s paper, by contrast, is full of complex statistical calculus involving “Euclidian distances” and “multidimensional scaling.”

    "...In 2017, I reported on a provocative study of vitamin B12 supplements, which can prevent anemia in people who don’t get enough through food. In excessive amounts, though, using these supplements was associated with higher rates of lung cancer. Again, this seemed to be by way of a metabolic pathway that fuels the tumor cells. Nutrients or vitamins are not simply good or bad, cancer-causing or cancer-fighting. If a book or blog recommends a single “cancer diet”—or even a supplement that promises to fight cancer—beware. It could end up making things worse. Especially if there is a person on the cover in a white coat with arms folded, and with teeth that look like they have never been used.

    "...For now, unless an oncologist has advised a specific diet tailored to your specific tumor, the most common recommendation is to eat a generally healthy diet. None of this challenges the principle that staying well nourished is part of a healthy approach to any disease; and there is no evidence that overall starvation is good or even safe. But focusing on specific patterns of eating will likely be part of many cancer-treatment guidelines in coming years. Food is medicine—or metabolic therapy. And no metabolic therapy is good or bad for everyone in every condition."
     
  2. Tarmander

    Tarmander Member

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    Nice find. Looks like they were talking about restricting Glycine though.
     
  3. LucyL

    LucyL Member

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    It looks like Glycine is not the bad guy a lot of researchers thought for a while....

    Serine, but Not Glycine, Supports One-Carbon Metabolism and Proliferation of Cancer Cells - ScienceDirect
    "Cancer cells selectively consumed exogenous serine, which was converted to intracellular glycine and one-carbon units for buildingnucleotides. Restriction of exogenous glycine or depletion of the glycine cleavage system did not impede proliferation. In the absence of serine, uptake of exogenous glycine was unable to support nucleotidesynthesis. Indeed, higher concentrations of glycine inhibited proliferation. "
     
  4. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Thanks. Yes, glycine is actually useful as cancer treatment as it also opposes arginine and arginine restriction is also a viable approach as metabolic cancer therapy. Glutamine restriction also works.
    Glycine May Treat Lung, Brain And Other Cancers
    Arginine Depletion May Be A Viable Approach For Cancer
    Melanoma Needs Glutamine To Grow And Dies Without It
    Arginine deprivation and autophagic cell death in cancer
    Arginine starvation kills tumor cells through aspartate exhaustion and mitochondrial dysfunction
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5457742/
     
  5. Kartoffel

    Kartoffel Member

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    @haidut How do you think about your own protein intake (which I believe is fairly high) in the context of all the evidence showing that restricting the amino acids most commonly found in high-quality animal protein is seemingly very beneficial?
     
  6. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I try to eat gelatin every day and I also take aspirin and niacinamide several times a week.
    Btw, the article above is just one approach to cancer. I posted it mostly because it is one of the first calls by a mainstream MD to treat cancer as a metabolic disease. More effective approaches to cancer treatment exist - e.g. inhibiting fatty acid oxidation. The restrictions of single amino acids are probably not going to be a cure-all but it is a step in the right direction. Cancer is like extreme diabetes, and should be handled by blocking/lowering FAO, restoring glucose metabolism, and keeping lactate in check (by raising CO2). That approach will likely work for all cancer types, while the amino acid restriction is currently only shown to affect specific cancer types.
    Inhibiting Lipolysis May Treat / Cure Cancer
     
  7. Tarmander

    Tarmander Member

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    I don't think its the bad guy either, but the article did.
     
  8. Kartoffel

    Kartoffel Member

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    True, the concept of selectively reducing single amino acids is not really useful, although it highlights some important aspects of harmful metabolic pathways. Still, the overall relationship between total protein intake and life-span and health seems pretty clear. Low-protein animals live longer, stay healthier longer, develop less cancer, and preserve high cognitive abilities into old age. High protein intake also seems to alter the microbiome in harmful way. If you eat a relatively significant amount of animal protein, it seems hard to avoid some of the harmful pathways associated with some of the amino acids involved in degenerative processes.
    I can't see how anything above something like 1g/kg or 12-15% of calories as protein would be beneficial. Positive nitrogen balance is achieved around those levels, and this amount seem optimal for resistance against disease. Even rapidly growing babies get 14 units of energy for every unit of protein, and I don't see why an adult should need more than that.
     
  9. Jem Oz

    Jem Oz Member

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    One thing the 'mainstream' will never do is admit they were wrong. If and when they fully embrace these ideas, they'll just act as if they knew it all along. It's like the colossal failure of the Genome Project. All that happens is the MSM stops reporting on it. Or the 70s when they were obsessed with finding a viral cause of cancer, and then just dropped it.

    Great find.
     
  10. RisingSun

    RisingSun Member

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    Not too sure about methionine restriction or any amino for that matter.

    Aajonus Vonderplanitz has had great success at curing dozens of cancer patients with massive amounts of raw eggs and raw meat per day.
    Up to 50 raw eggs and 2 pounds of raw meat per day was all they ate
     
  11. DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    I spoke to a psychiatrist a while back, and I mentioned Dr. Peat to him. Apparently, he knows of him and finds his theories interesting, so I think most underestimate the rate of information transmission in the modern world.
     
  12. LeeLemonoil

    LeeLemonoil Member

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  13. RobertJM

    RobertJM Member

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    I know Vonderplanitz is dead now (RIP), but I came across this guy who copies what Vonderplanitz was doing:



    This guy also eats huge amounts of raw (and rotting) animal products, and says his health has never been better. It’s a shame Vonderplanitz died as would have been so interesting to see how his health developed further.
     
  14. RisingSun

    RisingSun Member

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    Sv3rige doesn't copy Aajonus but has greatly inspired his way of life from him and you are right, probably applies 95% of his principles.

    I will always regret not having met Aajonus in person as I have a thousand questions to ask him. One of the greatest experimenters in the health world.

    I am still too afraid to try high meat but I intend to give it a go some day.
     
  15. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    @RisingSun

    - The Education of Cancer Healing - Vol. V: Explorers (978-1-291-45362-1)

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  16. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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  17. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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  18. Obi-wan

    Obi-wan Member

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    Glycine is a precursor to Glutathione which is the master antioxidant that cancer uses to protect itself from high ROS. Cancer hijacks normal cells and uses the Redox system to its advantage. All cancers have a phenotype that determines how it feeds itself. Some are Glucose feeders, some are Fatty Acid feeders, some are Glutamine feeders. Many are all three. If you block one source it will redirect and use another source. Diet alone will not cure cancer. That's why repurposing drugs are now being used to fight cancer. Jane McLelland recently wrote a book "How to Starve Cancer" and put together a "Metro Map" identifying all of the cancer feed lines and the drugs and supplements that block those lines.
    upload_2019-5-29_8-4-44.png

    The Care Oncology Clinic has identified a cocktail of 4 repurposed drugs that are used to weaken cancer and block their fuel lines. They are Metformin, Atorvastatin, Doxycycline, and Medbendazole. Jane has identified other drugs and supplements to further block these lines. Some cancers follow the Warburg effect. Others follow the reverse Warburg effect. The metabolic approach is to starve the cancer of nutrients and then go for the kill via high ROS.
     
  19. LeeLemonoil

    LeeLemonoil Member

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    Thanks for sharing that @Obi-wan - I'll definetey get that book.

    Side note: Tetracyclines - wrecking your tumors` but also your other useful mitochondria since 1948.
     
  20. Obi-wan

    Obi-wan Member

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    This is the phenotype of prostate cancer. It starts out as a Glutamine and Fatty acid feeder and later stage Glucose feeder. So all three. What is interesting is Prostate Cancer is fueled by androgens. So the first line of action by the medical community is androgen depravation therapy which works very well but later the cancer becomes castrate resistant. Androgens are used for lipid synthesis so if we stopped Lipid synthesis maybe we would not need androgen depravation therapy...

    upload_2019-5-29_8-19-50.png

    See https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318092915_The_Metabolic_Phenotype_of_Prostate_Cancer

    " Malignant cells, however, actively oxidize citrate and resume more typical citric acid cycle function. Of further interest, prostate cancer does not exhibit the Warburg effect, an increase in glucose uptake, seen in many other cancers."

    "While a large number of solid tumor cells adhere to this Warburg
    effect, prostate cancer has a markedly different phenotype. As
    noted above, benign prostate cells evade oxidative phosphoryla-
    tion at baseline. It has been shown that early prostate cancers rely
    on lipids and other energetic molecules for energy production
    and not on aerobic respiration (16, 17). Therefore, the Warburg
    effect does not hold consistent in the pathogenesis of prostate
    cancer, as these cells do not have the increased glucose uptake
    (18). Clinically this is relevant, as these cancers will not appear
    on FDG PET scans. It is only in the late stage with numerous
    mutation events that prostate cancer will begin exhibiting
    the Warburg effect and have a high glucose uptake."

    "Many cancers consume lipids in order to produce energy and
    avoid the citric acid cycle. Prostate cancer cells often utilize lipids
    derived from androgens through the expression of an androgen
    receptor (33).
    However, these cells can also utilize de novo lipid
    synthesis to produce fatty acids in order to obtain energy. this
    shift to a lipid-producing phenotype is a key turning point in
    the progression of prostate cancer. the de novo lipid producers
    have ability to produce the key energetic molecules for growth
    without the regulation of androgens (Figure1). Clinically, this
    is problematic as it represents a disease that is unresponsive to
    androgen deprivation therapy, known as castration-resistant
    prostate cancer (34)"

    "Research has shown that certain prostate cancer cells over-
    express certain markers that are key in the ability to produce
    de novo lipids (35). these include fatty acid synthase (FASN),
    sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1), and steroyl
    CoA desaturase among others. Steroyl CoA desaturase is a key
    enzyme in the formation of monounsaturated fatty acids from
    larger saturated fatty acids."

    FASN, Acetate, and SREBP1 are 3 of the fatty acid lines on Janes Metro map. Blocked by Berberine, Metformin and Aspirin.
     
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