Transmissible Viral Vaccines... how the shots are affecting those who haven't taken it. They may be designed to do exactly that

863127

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So if thymohydroquinone is BBB and CNS permeable, I'd guess that thymoquinone and other things in the black cumin seed oil are too. I'd also guess that the combination of chemicals in the oil...

(like in the first table in this post: Transmissible Viral Vaccines... how the shots are affecting those who haven't taken it. They may be designed to do exactly that )

...would be complementary as to the effects on those protein receptors that were studied with thymohydroquinone (my previous post).

And I agree with akgrrrl that the growing conditions, harvesting time, processing methods etc affect the composition of chemicals in the oil and so analysis of the batch is good. Some essential oil companies might do that, but with most "herbs" you just want to know where they grew and the processing methods; those are the biggest influences of the chemical composition. Any certified organic and cold-pressed black seed oil I expect would have a normal amount of the desired chemicals in it.

HCQ is more predictable. I wanted to check the details of how to use the black seed oil because I recognize maybe I was making some risky assumptions about thinking just make some tea with black cumin seeds and it's as good as HCQ because things in it can bind to ACE2.

But I do also still think that the combination of chemicals in the oil is complementary, and that combining black cumin seed with other "herbs" that have a similar combination (an "active" thing that's been shown to help with SARS-CoV-2 plus other supporting chemicals) -- like green tea (EGCG), licorice, ginger, cinchona bark (cinchona more cautiously than those others) -- would help to ensure that they're together as effective as HCQ because even if you're getting a small dose of some intended chemical (because of not knowing the compositional variation in it) you still have lots of other overlapping layers of backup. That overlapping layers of backup strategy could be ineffective if there's a virus variant that has a much stronger binding affinity than most chemicals in most herbs do for that receptor though (and so you'd want a specific dose of a specific chemical with a strong binding affinity, like dithymoquinone or HCQ, that it'd be hard to predict the dosage of if it's not isolated).
 
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863127

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159
I've been thinking about the use of antiglycation supplements such as thiamine for the spike protein.

Anti-Glycation Supplements

Pyridoxal-5’-phosphate
(Vitamin B6)
Riboflavin
Selenium Yeast:
Silymarin/Milk Thistle
Taurine
Thiamine
Vitamin C&E
(plus bioflavonoids)
Whole Spices and Herbs
Zinc

Aged Garlic Extract
Carnitine
Carnosine
Catechins
Coenzyme Q10
Curcumin and Turmeric


The vitamins and amino acids are in meat and eggs and dairy.
Coenzyme Q10 is in heart.
Lots of selenium in kidney.
Vitamin C in fruit, or could be fruit/berry tea (rose hips, elderberry, etc).
Catechins are in tea tea.
Milk thistle.
Spices.
Simmer ground milk thistle seeds and spices, then pour that onto berries and green tea.
Yum yum yum.
 

863127

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Messages
159
More about blood brain barrier permeability of quinones in black cumin seed oil


Targeting of Thymoquinone-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles to different brain areas: In vivo study

Heba M Fahmy, Mohamed M Fathy, Raghda A Abd-Elbadia, Wael M Elshemey

Life Sci 2019 Apr 1;222:94-102. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2019.02.058. Epub 2019 Mar 1.


Full: Sci-Hub | | 10.1016/j.lfs.2019.02.058

"Lately, there has been a growing interest in examining the possibility of drug delivery to brain using drug carriers [20-22]. Unfortunately, there is no study that examined the effect of drug loading on carriers on the distribution of drugs in different brain areas. Hence, this work aims to quantitatively evaluate the effect of TQ [thymoquinone] loading in MSNs [mesoporous silica nanoparticles] on the TQ distribution in different brain regions compared to free TQ. In addition, this work focuses on examining the oxidative stress condition of different rat brain areas after being treated with free TQ, MSNs or MSN-TQ.
...

Results showed that loading of TQ to the MSNs enhanced the drug targeting to the cortex, thalamus, midbrain and hypothalamus by 13%, 11%, 20%, and 71%, respectively, as compared to the TQ-group. In contrast, the encapsulation of TQ to mesopores silica nanocarriers reduced its targeting to the cerebellum by 20%. In case of medulla, striatum, and hippocampus, there were non significant changes in the TQ concentrations between the two experimental groups. Meanwhile, neither the free TQ nor the encapsulated one reached the hippocampus.."

("TQ group" is injected thymoquinone, "MSN-TQ" group is injected nanoparticle-carrier thymoquinone)
Thymoquinone nanoparticle brain distribution.png
_____

It's rats, and injected, but without the nanoparticle carriers almost as much of the thymoquinone did still cross the blood brain barrier (but not into the hippocampus).
 

Gone Peating

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More about blood brain barrier permeability of quinones in black cumin seed oil


Targeting of Thymoquinone-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles to different brain areas: In vivo study

Heba M Fahmy, Mohamed M Fathy, Raghda A Abd-Elbadia, Wael M Elshemey

Life Sci 2019 Apr 1;222:94-102. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2019.02.058. Epub 2019 Mar 1.


Full: Sci-Hub | | 10.1016/j.lfs.2019.02.058

"Lately, there has been a growing interest in examining the possibility of drug delivery to brain using drug carriers [20-22]. Unfortunately, there is no study that examined the effect of drug loading on carriers on the distribution of drugs in different brain areas. Hence, this work aims to quantitatively evaluate the effect of TQ [thymoquinone] loading in MSNs [mesoporous silica nanoparticles] on the TQ distribution in different brain regions compared to free TQ. In addition, this work focuses on examining the oxidative stress condition of different rat brain areas after being treated with free TQ, MSNs or MSN-TQ.
...

Results showed that loading of TQ to the MSNs enhanced the drug targeting to the cortex, thalamus, midbrain and hypothalamus by 13%, 11%, 20%, and 71%, respectively, as compared to the TQ-group. In contrast, the encapsulation of TQ to mesopores silica nanocarriers reduced its targeting to the cerebellum by 20%. In case of medulla, striatum, and hippocampus, there were non significant changes in the TQ concentrations between the two experimental groups. Meanwhile, neither the free TQ nor the encapsulated one reached the hippocampus.."

("TQ group" is injected thymoquinone, "MSN-TQ" group is injected nanoparticle-carrier thymoquinone)
View attachment 24621
_____

It's rats, and injected, but without the nanoparticle carriers almost as much of the thymoquinone did still cross the blood brain barrier (but not into the hippocampus).

So then thymoquinone and black cumin seed oil should be a decent second option behind HCQ?

HCQ is really expensive and hard to get rn so I might just get this
 

Doc Sandoz

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Patrick Timpone interviews Dr Stephanie Seneff and Dr Greg Nigh.

Topics covered sulphur metabolism, covid injections, spike proteins , Is it possible to detox spike proteins? Monolaurin, Transmission, immune system, glyphosate, chlorine dioxide

View: https://www.bitchute.com/video/Jk8M20DdyKVo/
Seneff is excellent at conveying the covid vax issues - deliberate, rational and well-explained. Nigh is good too. Her videos are becoming part of my arsenal of attempted persuasion. (This notwithstanding some of her more dubious conclusions vis-a-vis cancer and lactate being better than glucose for certain organs.)
 
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Nemo

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I have wondered about black seed oil as well. So, it is a good question, and here some wandering thoughts. We know that distillation of plants into oils can magnify the constituents as many as 10K times. But oils are not simple. They often contain 80 to 300 or more constituents, dependent on growing methods, harvest timing, soil, water. We are told these variables are the reason that synthetic compounds are better; they are more reliable. There is much to know about botanicals, and most of us-- rare the time to drill down. How is one to know if the thymol is present in high enough quantities, in the leaf/seed/root that we seek? Lets say you have a bottle labeled Basil(ocimum basilicum) which you have read contains eugenol, both anti-inflammatory and antiseptic. But wait, another basil has a profile high in linalool or fenchol is used antiseptically. Another basil is high in methyl chavicol is more anti-flam than antiseptic. Extraction and distillation methods have dramatic effects on the chemistry and thus medicinal action. How could it be much different for any seed oil?How many purveyors of the product you seek are caring to pay for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance testing, Gas Chromatography, or Mass Spectroscopy when all the consumer has to know is it's label or a familiar smell?
From what we know about seed oils via Dr. Peat, I have my reservations about black seeds oil. Yes we know plant oils inhalation easily allows molecules through the blood-brain-barrier after processing. But, if the profile of the material is unknown, just what are you allowing through your BBB? Why dont they just include a GS reading on the label like an ingredients label? If someone asks me if I want salad, what does that mean? Potato salad? Shrimp salad? Word salad?
I still have questions about black seed extractions and cant see how an adequate measure of the compounds exist to qualify as a dose.

I am very grateful to you for this knowledgeable and well-explained post.

If you should find a good provider who meets your requirements, would you please let us know?
 

863127

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Joined
Jan 29, 2021
Messages
159
So then thymoquinone and black cumin seed oil should be a decent second option behind HCQ?

HCQ is really expensive and hard to get rn so I might just get this

I mean I agree with Nemo about there being more certainty about what HCQ does from studies of using it specifically for SARS-CoV-2 in people, and the dosage predictability is good.

And if you use herbal medicines instead of HCQ, I'd use more than just black cumin seed oil, in addition to it, for the overlapping backup strategy I mentioned. But then there's still the risk of a virus variant's binding affinity being stronger than any of the chemicals there's much of a dose of in any of the herbs you're using. That's why I was trying to figure out how to calculate dosage of dithymoquinone specifically, because it has a higher binding affinity than lots of other plant chemicals that aren't better than HCQ (although there are some that are about as strongly binding and that might be easier to get a large dose of (because of the usual concentration of that chemical in that plant)). But if a variant doesn't have a stronger binding affinity than HCQ, yeah there are lots of plant chemicals that can be used instead of HCQ for preventing ACE2 binding. But because we don't know immediately as the variants evolve about variant binding affinity changes, I'd want to use a chemical that has at least as strong an affinity as HCQ does, and that I can be sure I'm getting large doses of regardless of variations of amounts of chemicals in that plant. The quinine (and/or other quinones?) in cinchona bark could be good instead of thymoquinone or dithymoquinone, but there's still the uncertainty of maybe underdosing because of being careful to avoid overdosing while estimating the dosage from percent variations of quinine in the bark.

And you could use a combination of herbal medicines and prescription pills if you're careful about cumulative toxicity -- like quinine in cinchona bark plus HCQ I would think would probably add together for the possibility of quinine overdose, or maybe thymoquinone in black cumin seed and quinone(s) in cinchona could be cumulatively toxic? I don't know about that.

Quinine binding affinity compared to HCQ and chloroquine

Molecular Docking of Quinine, Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine to Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) Receptor for Discovering New Potential COVID-19 Antidote

Keri Lestari1, Trully Sitorus, Instiaty, Sandra Megantara, Jutti Levita1
2020 Journal of Advanced Pharmacy Education & Research


"Results showed that chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, and quinine can interact with amino acid residues in the peptidase domain of the ACE2 receptor. Of the three compounds, quinine shows the strongest affinity to the ACE2 receptor (-4.89 kcal mol) followed by hydroxychloroquine (-3.87 kcal mol), and chloroquine (-3.17 kcal/mol), respectively."

Again, I don't understand the chemistry enough to know why those affinities are different than the affinities of HCQ and chloroquine in the studies in this post:

But however their methods (the one where it's quinine -4.89 kcal mol, hydroxychloroquine -3.87 kcal mol, chloroquine -3.17 kcal/mol) affect the affinity results differently than the other studies, in the context of just their methods and results and so the relative comparison there, quinine is apparently better than HCQ. But there's probably some reason I don't know about why HCQ has become popular instead of quinine.

I don't know what else HCQ might be doing other than preventing ACE2 binding. I havent read much about the details of what all HCQ is doing in studies with people. Like for example, Nemo's said that Ivermectin re-enables immune system functions that were disabled, and that HCQ doesn't do that. Maybe somehow HCQ is to black cumin seed oil as Ivermectin is to HCQ -- maybe HCQ does something useful black cumin seed oil doesn't. But we don't know because there aren't as detailed studies with this virus and people and black cumin seed oil like there are studies this virus and people and HCQ or Ivermectin. And so the safer assumption (than that black cumin doesn't not do something important HCQ does) would be use HCQ.

Dr. Fleming, on page 8 here:


says HCQ does these:
"Targets ACE2 receptor... enhances zinc entry through the zinc ionophore; enhances the production of type 1 interferons, interferes with ribosomal translation of the spike protein, reduces interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels; increases cellular pH thereby decreasing viral antigen (mRNA or spike protein) major histocompatability complex (MHC) presentation of the spike protein to Β-cells reducing antibody formation and ITR."

Compared to primaquine, which is in cinchona bark (but I don't know how much), which Fleming says:
"targets ACE2 receptor...[and] inhibits viral protein translation (production of spike protein from mRNA."

So, as an example of the more-studied drugs compared to herbal medicines, maybe primaquine and/or other quinones in cinchona bark do those other things Fleming says HCQ does, but there isn't proof of it right now, and so the safer assumption would be to use HCQ instead of cinchona bark. (On the other hand maybe things in the cinchona bark do desirable things HCQ doesn't; but I don't know that.)

__________

Binding affinities of Ivermectin compared to HCQ and chloroquine

Ivermectin Docks to the SARS-CoV-2 Spike Receptor-binding Domain Attached to ACE2

Steven Lehrer and Peter H. Rheinstein
in vivo 34: xxx-xxx (2020)
doi:10.21873/invivo.11xxx


"Ivermectin docked in the region of leucine 91 of the spike and histidine 378 of the ACE2 receptor. The binding energy of ivermectin to the spike ACE2 complex was -18 kcal/mol and binding constant was 5.8 e-08'"

(In case the methods they're using make that -18 not comparable to the -6 to -7 common for other chemicals in other studies, and I don't understand why, I looked for comparisons in one study of Ivermectin and HCQ.)

Molecular Docking Reveals Ivermectin and Remdesivir as Potential Repurposed Drugs Against SARS-CoV-2

Ahmad F. Eweas1, Amr A. Alhossary, and Ahmed S. Abdel-Moneim
Front. Microbiol., 25 January 2021


Table 5. Docking scores of different drugs against human ACE-2 protein.
Table 5 ACE2.jpg

(click for big zoom)

So there Ivermectin binds more strongly to ACE2 than HCQ or chloroquine do.

(I dont know what these next ones mean compared to the ACE2 affinities. Maybe someone else can interpret them.)

Table 1. Docking of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (PDB id = 6VXX) to selected drugs.
table 1.jpg


Table 2. Docking of the RdRp and nsp14 to selected drugs.
Table 2.jpg


Table 3. Docking of SARS-CoV-2 Mpro and PLpro against different drugs.
Table 3.jpg


Table 4. Docking of SARS-CoV-2 M and N proteins against different drugs.
Table 4.jpg
 
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863127

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Messages
159
I am very grateful to you for this knowledgeable and well-explained post.

If you should find a good provider who meets your requirements, would you please let us know?

Essential oil businesses that have good Certificates of Analysis.


Eden Botanicals

Example:
Black cumin seed CO2 extract

Certificate of Analysis (linked to on the left column of each product page)

So see there, thymoquinone 3.1%.
(That's just an example of the CoA; for black cumin seed oil CO2 extract is more expensive than just cold-pressed oil which would probably have the same amount of thymoquinone.)

Some of the "Components" analyses have lots:


Some have none:


_____


Another, Nature's Gift


Example:

Scroll down below the description paragraphs to "Certificate of Analysis: Batch No.:..."

 

Nemo

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Joined
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Messages
2,163
Essential oil businesses that have good Certificates of Analysis.


Eden Botanicals

Example:
Black cumin seed CO2 extract

Certificate of Analysis (linked to on the left column of each product page)

So see there, thymoquinone 3.1%.
(That's just an example of the CoA; for black cumin seed oil CO2 extract is more expensive than just cold-pressed oil which would probably have the same amount of thymoquinone.)

Some of the "Components" analyses have lots:


Some have none:


_____


Another, Nature's Gift


Example:

Scroll down below the description paragraphs to "Certificate of Analysis: Batch No.:..."


Wow, thank you for another highly informative post, 863127.

Here's a study that seems relevant showing it protected rats' brains against D-galactose administration at a dose of 20 mg/kg of thymoquinone:


I wonder if you could just dose the Eden product to symptom relief.
 

akgrrrl

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Location
Alaska
Wow, thank you for another highly informative post, 863127.

Here's a study that seems relevant showing it protected rats' brains against D-galactose administration at a dose of 20 mg/kg of thymoquinone:


I wonder if you could just dose the Eden product to symptom relief.
Yes good work 863127! I sent analysis report requests to 3 places yesterday, will see what happens.
 

Nemo

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Messages
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Yes good work 863127! I sent analysis report requests to 3 places yesterday, will see what happens.

Excellent! Thank you, akgrrrl. I'll be very interested to hear what you find out.

I have a question whether the antihistamine treatments are managing symptoms or are truly a cure for the prion disease, so I still feel like we need a back-up until we have more clarity.
 

863127

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Messages
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Wow, thank you for another highly informative post, 863127.

Here's a study that seems relevant showing it protected rats' brains against D-galactose administration at a dose of 20 mg/kg of thymoquinone:


I wonder if you could just dose the Eden product to symptom relief.

For the thymoquinone, I would buy cold-pressed oil instead of the CO2 extract, because the cold-pressed oil will probably still have about 2-4% thymoquinone and several brands sell it for about $25 for 8 oz compared to $61 for 8 oz of the CO2 extract.

Maybe there is something in the CO2 extract that's not in the cold-pressed oil that'd make it worth the money. This study (from post #387 on page 20 of this thread) said:

Chemical composition of Nigella sativa L. seed extracts obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide by Venkatachallam et al., 2010

"Chemical composition of black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) seed extracts obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide... Forty-seven volatile compounds were detected where sixteen compounds were reported for the first time in the oil of this seed."

So I don't know what those sixteen would do, but if you can afford much of the CO2 extract, at least one of those 16 probably does something to complement prion-preventing effects of what's in the cold-pressed oil.

The study in my post #400, about blood brain barrier-healing by interacting with brain proteins, was about thymohydroquinone. Thymohydroquinone is 0.06% of the volatile components of the CO2 extract, compared to thymoquinone being 43% of the volatile components. The amount of thymohydroquinone in the CO2 extract is about 0.14% of the amount of thymoquinone. Thymoquinone is 3.1% of the total components, so thymohydroquinone is about 0.00423% of the CO2 extract total components.

I don't know what minimum dose of thymohydroquinone would be useful for effects like in the study in post #400, but I'm guessing it'd get expensive to dose thymohydroquinone using the CO2 extract. But if thymoquinone also does what thymohydroquinone did in that study, there's (I'm guessing) useful-for-prion-prevention somewhat-BBB-healing amounts of thymoquinone in the cold-pressed oil too.

I wouldn't feel like I'm missing out with the cold-pressed oil because the plant's gotten its reputation for centuries from just the seeds and cold-pressed oil; CO2 extract was invented recently. Although so was the modified spike protein. Yeah but by that logic that a recently invented processing and/or delivery method is needed to be strong enough against the modified spike protein's effects, why the CO2 extract of black cumin seed, why not a nano-carrier formulation of a CO2 extract of some other herb, for example? I don't have the money to assume which not-much-studied recently invented processing or delivery methods are worth trying (unless I'm assuming none of them) instead of the traditional processing and delivery methods that there's more probably-applicable (in context of the modified spike proteins) evidence about.

This study is a good review of the cold-pressed oil composition:

A Comprehensive Review of the Physicochemical, Quality and Nutritional Properties of Nigella Sativa Oil
by Mazaheri et al., 2019

And back to how to dose the thymoquinone by milligrams -- if the percent thymoquinone is 3%, we can calculate by weight percentage how many milligrams of thymoquinone in how many grams of oil. But the oil is poured in fluid ounces, so it'd be convenient for one of us to measure how many grams one ounce of the oil weighs. I don't have a bottle of the oil or a scale right now. (I'm making tea with the ground black cumin seeds, milk thistle seeds, licorice, curry spice blend, pau d'arco, green tea, and propolis vodka, for the overlapping supporting and complementary chemicals strategy; and less often, more careful dosages, cinchona bark tea. I'm getting Ivermectin soon too.)

_____

More about essential oils... I haven't found specific studies with details proving this yet, but I expect essential oils to be useful to prevent spike proteins that are inhaled from getting onto cells, if the oils are on the membranes in the nose and being inhaled to the olfactory bulb (or some other thing at the top of the nose I don't know of that would absorb the chemicals instead of the olfactory bulb). In Ayurveda there's a technique called nasya of using a dropper to put infused carrier oils or essential oils diluted with carrier oils into the nose and then you snort it up into the top of the nose where it affects the brain more (I don't know how anatomically). Don't do it with non-diluted essential oils; some can cause long-term damage. This is a good book about Ayurveda's panchkarma methods, which includes nasya:

Ayurveda and Panchakarma by Sunil Joshi

I had about 3/4 of an ounce of black cumin seed oil sitting around, and put a few drops each of frankincense, myrrh, rose otto, and spruce needle essential oils into that, and I've been putting that in my nose when I'm in public where I expect to inhale some spike proteins.

Some essential oils are useful internally, orally, digested, but you gotta be careful about how to dilute them in a carrier oil depending which essential oil it is, and some aren't safe to ingest any of. Frankincense and myrrh you can add two or three drops per ounce of carrier oil (like black cumin seed) and it's safe to ingest those. Those are two that are generally good for immune system and brain health, and so, without specific studies to suggest which other oils might be better, they're a good bet to be a good value against the spike proteins.
 
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J.R.K

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Messages
705
Byram Brindle, the viral immunologist at the University of Guelph, apparently announced on the Alex Jones show today that both the vax mRNA and spike proteins have just been confirmed to be transferred via breast milk.

He says suckling infants are coming down with vax-caused bleeding disorders.

This is important, because it's the first time we have confirmation of environmental transmission of the vax nanoparticles and mRNA via bodily liquids.

View: https://www.bitchute.com/video/EcSdSlklG3SA/

He also confirmed that study where they collected blood from 13 young nurses who got the Moderna vax was bad news. He thought it was very bad that the spike protein circulated in the blood for several days.

And he also released new info on where the vax mRNA concentrates. We knew it concentrated in the liver and spleen, but it's definitely also the ovaries, adrenal gland and bone marrow.

German geneticist Jacob Wes Ulm said from the beginning those nanoparticles would make it into the bone marrow to cause the platelet problems.
A Canadian hero no doubt! It is hard to believe how much antagonism he has received for speaking out on these many concerns!!
 

Nemo

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Messages
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A Canadian hero no doubt! It is hard to believe how much antagonism he has received for speaking out on these many concerns!!

He really is, JRK. You can tell he's got that polite Canadian personality and he always tries to sound reasonable and calm but he gets the truth out there.
 

J.R.K

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Messages
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He really is, JRK. You can tell he's got that polite Canadian personality and he always tries to sound reasonable and calm but he gets the truth out there.
Hard to believe that he is only 45 minutes away from me! I gained some faith in my civil servants because of him !
 

Gone Peating

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Messages
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A Canadian hero no doubt! It is hard to believe how much antagonism he has received for speaking out on these many concerns!!
Yea this basically confirms that even the unvaxxed are getting vaxxed through shedding from the vaxxed.

Man I hate this world
 

Sefton10

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For the thymoquinone, I would buy cold-pressed oil instead of the CO2 extract, because the cold-pressed oil will probably still have about 2-4% thymoquinone and several brands sell it for about $25 for 8 oz compared to $61 for 8 oz of the CO2 extract.

Maybe there is something in the CO2 extract that's not in the cold-pressed oil that'd make it worth the money. This study (from post #387 on page 20 of this thread) said:

Chemical composition of Nigella sativa L. seed extracts obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide by Venkatachallam et al., 2010

"Chemical composition of black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) seed extracts obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide... Forty-seven volatile compounds were detected where sixteen compounds were reported for the first time in the oil of this seed."

So I don't know what those sixteen would do, but if you can afford much of the CO2 extract, at least one of those 16 probably does something to complement prion-preventing effects of what's in the cold-pressed oil.

The study in my post #400, about blood brain barrier-healing by interacting with brain proteins, was about thymohydroquinone. Thymohydroquinone is 0.06% of the volatile components of the CO2 extract, compared to thymoquinone being 43% of the volatile components. The amount of thymohydroquinone in the CO2 extract is about 0.14% of the amount of thymoquinone. Thymoquinone is 3.1% of the total components, so thymohydroquinone is about 0.00423% of the CO2 extract total components.

I don't know what minimum dose of thymohydroquinone would be useful for effects like in the study in post #400, but I'm guessing it'd get expensive to dose thymohydroquinone using the CO2 extract. But if thymoquinone also does what thymohydroquinone did in that study, there's (I'm guessing) useful-for-prion-prevention somewhat-BBB-healing amounts of thymoquinone in the cold-pressed oil too.

I wouldn't feel like I'm missing out with the cold-pressed oil because the plant's gotten its reputation for centuries from just the seeds and cold-pressed oil; CO2 extract was invented recently. Although so was the modified spike protein. Yeah but by that logic that a recently invented processing and/or delivery method is needed to be strong enough against the modified spike protein's effects, why the CO2 extract of black cumin seed, why not a nano-carrier formulation of a CO2 extract of some other herb, for example? I don't have the money to assume which not-much-studied recently invented processing or delivery methods are worth trying (unless I'm assuming none of them) instead of the traditional processing and delivery methods that there's more probably-applicable (in context of the modified spike proteins) evidence about.

This study is a good review of the cold-pressed oil composition:

A Comprehensive Review of the Physicochemical, Quality and Nutritional Properties of Nigella Sativa Oil
by Mazaheri et al., 2019

And back to how to dose the thymoquinone by milligrams -- if the percent thymoquinone is 3%, we can calculate by weight percentage how many milligrams of thymoquinone in how many grams of oil. But the oil is poured in fluid ounces, so it'd be convenient for one of us to measure how many grams one ounce of the oil weighs. I don't have a bottle of the oil or a scale right now. (I'm making tea with the ground black cumin seeds, milk thistle seeds, licorice, curry spice blend, pau d'arco, green tea, and propolis vodka, for the overlapping supporting and complementary chemicals strategy; and less often, more careful dosages, cinchona bark tea. I'm getting Ivermectin soon too.)

_____

More about essential oils... I haven't found specific studies with details proving this yet, but I expect essential oils to be useful to prevent spike proteins that are inhaled from getting onto cells, if the oils are on the membranes in the nose and being inhaled to the olfactory bulb (or some other thing at the top of the nose I don't know of that would absorb the chemicals instead of the olfactory bulb). In Ayurveda there's a technique called nasya of using a dropper to put infused carrier oils or essential oils diluted with carrier oils into the nose and then you snort it up into the top of the nose where it affects the brain more (I don't know how anatomically). Don't do it with non-diluted essential oils; some can cause long-term damage. This is a good book about Ayurveda's panchkarma methods, which includes nasya:

Ayurveda and Panchakarma by Sunil Joshi

I had about 3/4 of an ounce of black cumin seed oil sitting around, and put a few drops each of frankincense, myrrh, rose otto, and spruce needle essential oils into that, and I've been putting that in my nose when I'm in public where I expect to inhale some spike proteins.

Some essential oils are useful internally, orally, digested, but you gotta be careful about how to dilute them in a carrier oil depending which essential oil it is, and some aren't safe to ingest any of. Frankincense and myrrh you can add two or three drops per ounce of carrier oil (like black cumin seed) and it's safe to ingest those. Those are two that are generally good for immune system and brain health, and so, without specific studies to suggest which other oils might be better, they're a good bet to be a good value against the spike proteins.
Excellent info, 863127. Do you think there is significant benefit to the oil over say a teaspoon of ground seeds? I enjoy the ground seeds mixed with honey and assumed the seeds will retain many other synergistic compounds perhaps lost in the oil.
 

J.R.K

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Great information @863127!! I appreciate it, this could be very valuable in the event that the powers that be decide to clamp down on the supply of Ivermectin and Hydroxychloroquine.
Do you have any good clean sources that you trust for your essential oils and cumin seed oil that you like and found to be the best bang for your buck?
 

Nemo

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For the thymoquinone, I would buy cold-pressed oil instead of the CO2 extract, because the cold-pressed oil will probably still have about 2-4% thymoquinone and several brands sell it for about $25 for 8 oz compared to $61 for 8 oz of the CO2 extract.

Maybe there is something in the CO2 extract that's not in the cold-pressed oil that'd make it worth the money. This study (from post #387 on page 20 of this thread) said:

Chemical composition of Nigella sativa L. seed extracts obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide by Venkatachallam et al., 2010

"Chemical composition of black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) seed extracts obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide... Forty-seven volatile compounds were detected where sixteen compounds were reported for the first time in the oil of this seed."

So I don't know what those sixteen would do, but if you can afford much of the CO2 extract, at least one of those 16 probably does something to complement prion-preventing effects of what's in the cold-pressed oil.

The study in my post #400, about blood brain barrier-healing by interacting with brain proteins, was about thymohydroquinone. Thymohydroquinone is 0.06% of the volatile components of the CO2 extract, compared to thymoquinone being 43% of the volatile components. The amount of thymohydroquinone in the CO2 extract is about 0.14% of the amount of thymoquinone. Thymoquinone is 3.1% of the total components, so thymohydroquinone is about 0.00423% of the CO2 extract total components.

I don't know what minimum dose of thymohydroquinone would be useful for effects like in the study in post #400, but I'm guessing it'd get expensive to dose thymohydroquinone using the CO2 extract. But if thymoquinone also does what thymohydroquinone did in that study, there's (I'm guessing) useful-for-prion-prevention somewhat-BBB-healing amounts of thymoquinone in the cold-pressed oil too.

I wouldn't feel like I'm missing out with the cold-pressed oil because the plant's gotten its reputation for centuries from just the seeds and cold-pressed oil; CO2 extract was invented recently. Although so was the modified spike protein. Yeah but by that logic that a recently invented processing and/or delivery method is needed to be strong enough against the modified spike protein's effects, why the CO2 extract of black cumin seed, why not a nano-carrier formulation of a CO2 extract of some other herb, for example? I don't have the money to assume which not-much-studied recently invented processing or delivery methods are worth trying (unless I'm assuming none of them) instead of the traditional processing and delivery methods that there's more probably-applicable (in context of the modified spike proteins) evidence about.

This study is a good review of the cold-pressed oil composition:

A Comprehensive Review of the Physicochemical, Quality and Nutritional Properties of Nigella Sativa Oil
by Mazaheri et al., 2019

And back to how to dose the thymoquinone by milligrams -- if the percent thymoquinone is 3%, we can calculate by weight percentage how many milligrams of thymoquinone in how many grams of oil. But the oil is poured in fluid ounces, so it'd be convenient for one of us to measure how many grams one ounce of the oil weighs. I don't have a bottle of the oil or a scale right now. (I'm making tea with the ground black cumin seeds, milk thistle seeds, licorice, curry spice blend, pau d'arco, green tea, and propolis vodka, for the overlapping supporting and complementary chemicals strategy; and less often, more careful dosages, cinchona bark tea. I'm getting Ivermectin soon too.)

_____

More about essential oils... I haven't found specific studies with details proving this yet, but I expect essential oils to be useful to prevent spike proteins that are inhaled from getting onto cells, if the oils are on the membranes in the nose and being inhaled to the olfactory bulb (or some other thing at the top of the nose I don't know of that would absorb the chemicals instead of the olfactory bulb). In Ayurveda there's a technique called nasya of using a dropper to put infused carrier oils or essential oils diluted with carrier oils into the nose and then you snort it up into the top of the nose where it affects the brain more (I don't know how anatomically). Don't do it with non-diluted essential oils; some can cause long-term damage. This is a good book about Ayurveda's panchkarma methods, which includes nasya:

Ayurveda and Panchakarma by Sunil Joshi

I had about 3/4 of an ounce of black cumin seed oil sitting around, and put a few drops each of frankincense, myrrh, rose otto, and spruce needle essential oils into that, and I've been putting that in my nose when I'm in public where I expect to inhale some spike proteins.

Some essential oils are useful internally, orally, digested, but you gotta be careful about how to dilute them in a carrier oil depending which essential oil it is, and some aren't safe to ingest any of. Frankincense and myrrh you can add two or three drops per ounce of carrier oil (like black cumin seed) and it's safe to ingest those. Those are two that are generally good for immune system and brain health, and so, without specific studies to suggest which other oils might be better, they're a good bet to be a good value against the spike proteins.

You are killing it with these posts, 863127. Your idea about using the oils in your nose as protection is brilliant.

There was an Indian study a couple of months ago in which they used something in the nose in addition to something else (HCQ or ivermectin) as prophylaxis. The thing in the nose significantly improved results.

Studies keep showing the primary public exposure spike access route to the brain is the nose.

I'm passing your post on to the twitter Covid scientist crowd.
 
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