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Source Of Ray Peat Quote

Discussion in 'Ray Peat Quotes' started by Regina, Apr 20, 2017 at 10:22 PM.

  1. Regina

    Regina Member

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    can anyone point me to the source of this quote?
    "Intense stress activates epigenetic processes that I think are hard to reverse. Temporary excess of some nutrients can probably help to restore processes to normal, or to higher functional levels. Deprivation increases the ability to tolerate deprivation. The mind is always involved, with imagination being part of the body-forming processes, and it's important to keep the whole life development in mind.
    Raymond Peat, stress - development"

    I want to discuss this with my original zen/aikido teacher. Specifically, Peat says the mind is always involved. I would like to know the extent which someone who has a ton of mind training has control over the physiological stress responses. There is a point where it fails and one is in danger of training in order to tolerate more deprivation.
     
  2. Dante

    Dante Member

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    You may like Norman doidge's book - the brain's way of healing and the brain that changes itself
     
  3. Regina

    Regina Member

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    Neat! Thx for the tip Dante.
     
  4. Sheik

    Sheik Member

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  5. Regina

    Regina Member

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    Thanks so much Shiek.
    The additional remarks are very helpful (at least in my grasping the concepts).
    "If mental activity has a sense of obligation, of being pushed, it can raise the same stress mediators (serotonin, TSH, prolactin, CRH, cortisol, etc.), but if the attitude is one of opening and exploring new possibilities, it activates restorative processes throughout the body."
    It is so obvious in my training (and definitely in school, social situations and work growing up). In class, if I get to work with someone who is open, supportive and with good intention (and who has the skill), I find I am able to do so much more than I thought. But if someone is nasty and relentlessly nit-picky, I find I can't even do the simplest things correctly.
     
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