Lucid Dreaming: Increased Connectivity Between Frontopolar Cortex & Temporoparietal Areas

Discussion in 'Mind, Sleep, Stress' started by Lewis Acid, Sep 15, 2020.

  1. Lewis Acid

    Lewis Acid Member

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    Frequent lucid dreaming associated with increased functional connectivity between frontopolar cortex and temporoparietal association areas.
    Compared to controls, the frequent lucid dream group showed significantly increased resting-state functional connectivity between left aPFC and bilateral angular gyrus, bilateral middle temporal gyrus and right inferior frontal gyrus, and higher node degree and strength in left aPFC.
    Our results suggest that frequent lucid dreaming is associated with increased functional connectivity between aPFC and temporoparietal association areas, regions normally deactivated during sleep.
     
  2. OP
    Lewis Acid

    Lewis Acid Member

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    Mnemonic Induction of Lucid Dreams (MILD)

    The MILD technique employs prospective memory, remembering to do something (notice you're dreaming) in the future. Dr. LaBerge developed this technique for his doctoral dissertation and used it to achieve lucid dreaming at will. The proper time to practice MILD is after awakening from a dream, before returning to sleep.
    1. Setup dream recall.
      Set your mind to awaken from dreams and recall them. When you awaken from a dream, recall it as completely as you can.

    2. Focus your intent.
      While returning to sleep, concentrate single-mindedly on your intention to remember to recognize that you're dreaming. Tell yourself: "Next time I'm dreaming, I will remember I'm dreaming," repeatedly, like a mantra. Put real meaning into the words and focus on this idea alone. If you find yourself thinking about anything else, let it go and bring your mind back to your intention.

    3. See yourself becoming lucid.
      As you continue to focus on your intention to remember when you're dreaming, imagine that you are back in the dream from which you just awakened (or another one you have had recently if you didn't remember a dream on awakening). Imagine that this time you recognize that you are dreaming. Look for a dreamsign—something in the dream that demonstrates plainly that it is a dream. When you see it say to yourself: "I'm dreaming!" and continue your fantasy. Imagine yourself carrying out your plans for your next lucid dream. For example, if you want to fly in your lucid dream, imagine yourself flying after you come to the point in your fantasy when you become lucid.

    4. Repeat until your intention is set.
      Repeat steps 2 and 3 until either you fall asleep or are sure that your intention is set. If, while falling asleep, you find yourself thinking of anything else, repeat the procedure so that the last thing in your mind before falling asleep is your intention to remember to recognize the next time you are dreaming.
     
  3. rei

    rei Member

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    Are there any known "supplements" that could increase the connectivity? Psychedelics immediately come to mind in increasing brain connectivity but does it happen between these areas? And are there psychedelics that allow you to sleep? At least lsd is described as making sleeping impossible.
     
  4. OP
    Lewis Acid

    Lewis Acid Member

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    Vitamin B6 helps people recall their dreams
     
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