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Treatments With Tumor Dissolving Potential

Discussion in 'Supplements' started by shepherdgirl, Feb 3, 2017.

  1. shepherdgirl

    shepherdgirl Member

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    Hi all, thought it would be useful to have a collection of treatments that could potentially diminish or eliminate particular types or various types of tumors. Maybe they are not all according to Peat protocol, but at least they might possibly have fewer side effects than some of the pharmaceuticals and add to treatment options.

    curcumin:
    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) inhibits cell proliferation, induces apoptosis, and decreases hormone levels and secretion in pituitary tumor cells.
    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) inhibits cell proliferation, induces apoptosis, and decreases hormone levels and secretion in pituitary tumor cells. - PubMed - NCBI
    FYI have also heard good things about liposomal curcumin, and also that piperine (black pepper) and fat are supposed to enhance curcumin effectiveness. The liposomal curcumin is pretty expensive - i saw a diy video online for it.

    serrapeptase

    nattokinase
     
  2. Travis

    Travis Member

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    Nice. Curcumin is both a glyoxylase I inhibitor and a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, making it a double-acting carcinostatic agent.

    ...but ingesting grams daily will only lead to undetectable plasma levels. This means that it's essentially suitable for skin and GI cancers, and suitable nowhere else. However, you can take hints from curcumin's mechanism of action and use more water-soluble glyoxylase I and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for other cancers.

    β-lapachone appears to be the most powerful water-soluble glyoxylase I inhibitor.
     
  3. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    Laetrile.

    Vit K2

    Carrot juice

    The Bob Beck blood electrifier

    A whole lot of anti cancer plants: dandelion root, artemisinin, oleander, comfrey, blushwood tree, avemar, garlic, graviola, lapacho (pau d'arco), ukrain , goldenseal, and of course all the eschariotics, which include the Hoxsey formula.
     
  4. Travis

    Travis Member

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    Pau d'Arco has the most powerful natural glyoxylase I inhibitors known: lapachol and β-lapachone. There's been dozens of studies on these two molecules, which tie-in nicely with the work of Koch and Szent-Györgyi. I would put this plant at the very top of the list, although curcumin should be the best for lower GI cancers since it basically coats the intestines. There's been a few pharmacokinetic studies demonstrating how curcumin is distributed within the body.

    The amino acid L-threonine will become methylglyoxal within the body (through aminoacetone intermediate), so pau d'arco with L-threonine would appear to be a safe and all-natural Szent-Györgyi-approved approach—with a Koch Seal of Approval™—to raise intracellular methylglyoxal levels. Add to this a Gerson-type diet (sans the linoleic acid-containing flaxseed oil) and you'd probably be reversing tumors in a manner similar to the lab-rats given such things.

    Glyoxylase I & II together turn methylglyoxal into lactic acid. Inhibiting one of these enzymes lowers intracellular lactic acid concentrations. Considering just this one enzymatic system alone, low methylglyoxal levels are synonymous with high lactic acid levels. This could help explain the findings of Otto Warburg, while linking together the apparently unrelated observations of two great biochemical Nobelists—Otto Warburg of Germany and Albert Szent-Györgyi of Hungary.

    The plant polyphenol baicalein appears to the most powerful glyoxylase I inhibitor among the class of polyphenols.

    The low-methionine diet of Gerson should be stressed, as is low in methionine; this would be expected to lead to low intracellular polyamine levelspowerful growth factors which act on DNA replication by directly stabilizing and/or uncoiling the helix. Methylglyoxal binds to, and inactivates polyamines.

    And limiting linoleic acid should limit excessive prostaglandins, intracellular autocrine hormones which effect DNA→mRNA transcription through the nuclear PPAR receptors.
     
  5. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    Exemplary, these might interest you:
    http://www.ganzheitliche-gesundheit.info/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/DKC_Dahmke_Boettcher.pdf
    Heat-Solubilized Curcumin Should Be Considered in ClinicalTrials for Increasing Bioavailability
    Oral administration of heat-solubilized curcumin for potentially increasing curcumin bioavailability in experimental animals
     
  6. Travis

    Travis Member

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    I wouldn't bother, unless someone has a GI cancer. Taking gram amounts of curcumin leads to undetectable plasma levels, and I wouldn't suppose anything could drastically change that.

    Baicalein is better; this molecule is the most powerful polyphenol glyoxylase inhibitor, slightly edging out myricetin. Also, it is a lipoxygenase inhibitor; these enzymes creates eicosanoids even worse than prostaglandins (i.e. leukotriene B4).

    So I would put baicalein on a much higher level than curcumin, unless someone has a GI cancer—where the decreased absorption would be considered a plus.
     
  7. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    Ok, now it makes sense your recommendation for this root + Pau d'Arco on the Gerson thread.
     
  8. Dhair

    Dhair Member

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    Slightly off topic, but have you ever been able to have a serious conversation with a physician about Warburg or Szent-Gyorgyi's work as it relates specifically to cancer research? Or William Koch, for that matter? I am struggling to imagine a counter-argument or an explanation that would justify the medical community's complete ignorance/corruption when it comes cancer treatment. Surely mainstream medicine must have some kind of semi-coherent response?
     
  9. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    In Koch's case, probably the same excuse used by them to put him in jail or exhaleI mean, exile him.
     
  10. Travis

    Travis Member

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    I think they just ignore it, like cardiologists just ignore Linus Pauling.

    It's all about politics, or sociology; they seem to care little whether something works or not. In some fields of medicine, things absolutely must work for them to be profitable. However, the fields of cardiology and oncology appear to rely on ignorance and fraud. There is simply no logical way to justify using 5‐fluorouracil and doxorubicin to treat cancer over the safer and more effective methylglyoxal. I think many of them know this. Modern pharmacology is so profitable that the beneficiaries continue to ignore logic, use deception, and feed the media with their special brand of ridicule against the so‐called 'quackery'—a word that simply amounts to 'unprofitable,' if you analyze how its used.

    Many 'standard' medical approaches are, quite frankly, illogical. If one should doubt this, they should perhaps read Willis' and Pauling's articles. After doing this, and seeing the weight of evidence for each explanation for cardiovascular disease, I think any unbiased person would agree that Pauling's explanation has much more truth value. Some people are heavily influenced by television and mainstream media and seem to consider them as conduits for cutting‐edge and honest truth, but I think this is absurd. Things like logic, biochemistry, chemistry, physics, and mathematics have always been considered closer to the 'truth' by serious people—closer than explanations the media and politicians have historically confabulated for power and profit.
     
  11. Dhair

    Dhair Member

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    But both Warburg and Szent-Gyorgyi won the Nobel Prize. How the hell do medical professionals justify the cognitive dissonance? Doctors are either much dumber than society gives them credit for, or they are mostly literal psychopaths. I am not typically this cynical, but I see no alternative explanation...
    I know that you and @haidut were talking about Abram Hoffer's research with niacin and schizophrenia. Again, this is another mind-boggling scenario IMO because he was a well respected psychiatrist/researcher who I would have to assume was dismissed as a liar by his peers...? You would have to call him a liar. There's no other way.
    Gilbert Ling is another example. He is dismissed by some people simply because they will not put in the time and effort to learn his work and see that it is valid, and demonstrably so. They just run away.
    But really, it's like these people are living in an alternate reality. Facts don't matter in academia and medicine. It's only about power and prestige.
     
  12. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    It's perfectly legal for medical schools and their medical teachers to simply ignore scientific research.

    They just pick and choose whatever and how it pleases them.

    Students know the moment they step out of line and start using remedies outside of their studied medical courses they're on their way to kiss their license goodbye.

    And by the way, Hoffer was so disgusted by the academic obfuscation of his findings he voluntarily renounced his medical license towards the end of his career. He just refused to be associated any longer with this profession.

    06.18 : "We must hold the medical profession accountable"

    transcript:
    " The main message has to be that we have to change the system. The system is sick and corrupt. We have to change the system. Eventually we have to make the medical profession accountable. Someone has to ask the medical professional, “Why do you tolerate this?” We have to ask them that. What we need in Canada is an independent commission headed by a Judge, broad-sweeping commission to actually examine the whole issue, “Why is the medical profession not being held accountable?

    If you blame anyone, who do you blame? You blame the drug companies? You blame the hospitals? You blame the government for not putting enough money in the system? You blame the food supply? Have you ever heard of anyone saying to the medical profession, “How come you don’t do a better job?” Have you ever heard that? Well, I think this has to be examined.

    If you go to a hospital and you say, “Why don’t you do better job?” They’ll say I will, give me more money, give me more staff, more doctors, more nurses. They don’t give a damn. You can give them 10 times more doctors. If you have the wrong treatment, the patients still won’t get well.

    Big Pharma controls medicine today. They give huge grants to the medical schools. Often times, these medical schools don’t have time to do any other studies. They just obediently work for the drug companies. Big Pharma controls everything. In the United States alone, in [2006] they spent $19 billion dollars, $19 billion dollars a year advertising to doctors. They claim the advertising doesn’t persuade doctors, which is kind of funny. If the advertising didn’t persuade doctors, why would Big Pharma spend $19 billion trying to do that? They control the journals. Any medical journal today that you pick up, at least half the pages are drug ads. You’ll never find an ad for good food, you won’ find an ad for vitamins, you won’t find an ad for holistic health. You won’t find an ad for these things.

    We are really in a terrible situation. The system is really sick. You can quote me literally. I think the system is absolutely sick and it has to be changed. I’m not the only one who says that. The Province of Ontario said the same thing. The latest Senate Committee by Senator Kirby said the same thing. If you read his report, he says [the healthcare system] is dysfunctional. He called the Canadian Health Care system dysfunctional. That means it’s sick. All these people who have looked at it, studied it, written books about it, all maintain that the healthcare system is sick. And I agree. We have to do something about it.

    We have to inform the public. We have to let the public know exactly what is happening. Because right now, they don’t know."
     
  13. Travis

    Travis Member

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    I think Hoffer is a bit different, because psychiatry is inherently less rigorous. There seems to be no model of the mind that everyone can agree on. But I think the others though are good examples of unpolitical truths.

    I think you could say that Gilbert Ling had sufficiently proven that Na⁺/K⁺‐ATPase was not a 'pump,' and I can see no financial reason why textbooks still purport its reality; I think this must be understood sociologically. People like Thomas Kuhn talk about how the illogical scientific theories can endure, and famed logician Karl Popper has a few things to say about quantum mechanics. I think that most people, even most scientists, don't care about truth as much as you might think. Middle‐aged scientists seem more concerned about defending their decades‐old views, resisting change while patting themselves on the backs for creating them.

    But the profit stream is much easier to understand than the more apolitical science. There are incomes, yachts, condos, and skyscrapers which all depend on Phizer sales. Many executive decisions in pharmaceutical companies, and in the FDA, are actually made by lawyers; are these people not going to engage in serious salesmanship—perhaps with a little uncivil, or even illegal, competition? Experience will say 'yes, they will:' The Vioxx Scandal is a well‐known case, and the FDA has been harassing doctors—such as Gerson, Koch, and Hoxley—using very safe and effective therapies for over a century.
     
  14. raypeatclips

    raypeatclips Member

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    Any idea what dosages would be suitable for GI cancers? Also, do you think curcumin helps prevent, or just treat cancer? I have a family history of GI cancer so would be nice to use something easy to help prevent it.
     
  15. Travis

    Travis Member

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    Curcumin is good for GI cancers because it's barely absorbed, and safe in gram amounts for the same reason. There is essentially no limit of how much a person could take. It inhibits COX‐2 and glyoxylase I but doesn't penetrate cells as readily as the smaller, hydrophillic, charged molecules do.

    I think polyamines are a considerable, underappreciated cause. Ray Peat has one article on polyamines; they act to proliferate cells in a dose‐dependent manner. I would avoid all soy sauce and fermented meat, as these are perhaps the biggest dietary sources of polyamines. Fermented meat has much higher levels of the longer‐chained polyamines than non‐fermented, while the shorter‐chained polyamines are found in roughly the same concentrations. Meat itself seems to present little issue, as long as bacteria in the intestines don't create polyamines from the arginine and methionine. Different strains of bacteria have different proclivities towards polyamine production.

    And of course I think everyone—in my opinion—should avoid linoleic acid. I found a straightforward mechanism for the link between linoleic acid and prostate cancer. Fist, an eicosanoid derived from arachidonic acid by the name of leukotriene B4 acts on its receptor; this event upregulates transcritption for the androgen receptor in the prostate (and elsewhere). One of the effects of androgens is to increase ornithine decarboxylase, and it needs the androgen receptor for this to occur. Ornithine decarboxylase is main enzyme responsible for producing polyamines. This should be no surprise as androgens are always anabolic, and there has to be some way to explain how they can induce growth. This links the three main molecular agents together—eicosanoids, androgens, and polyamines—known to be involved in the etiology of prostate cancer in a relatively straightforward, transcriptional manner.

    I think as long as people stay away from fermented meat, soy sauce, and fish (and don't eat too much in general), they should be fine. Androgens are one thing we cannot do without; but limiting polyamines, linoleic acid, and methionine is certainly do‐able. The potato, dairy, and fruit diet popular around here doesn't seem like it would be very conducive for GI cancer. If I were to experimentally induce GI cancer in rats, I would feed them: fermented sausage, potato chips fried in canola oil, and smoked salmon with soy sauce. Polyamines are nearly absent from dairy—even fermented dairy—and casein is low enough in methionine that scientists always feel the need to add this amino acid to the rat diets which contain it.

    Hernández-Jover. "Biogenic amine and polyamine contents in meat and meat products." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (1997)
    Peat, Ray. "Meat physiology, stress, and degenerative physiology." raypeat.com (2006)
     
  16. raypeatclips

    raypeatclips Member

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    Thank you for the reply. I have been avoiding linooleic acid and all PUFA as best as I can for years, so should be covered on that front. I wondered about a couple of things you mentioned. When you talk about fermented meat, what do you mean? Meat that has been aged (I see in supermarkets the beef always says 21 days matured, 28 days matured etc) Or do you mean something such as pickled meat, or something else?

    The second thing was the reference to not eat too much in general. Were you talking about this specifically about GI stress, or the issues that weight gain can bring?

    And finally with fish, I noticed you said to avoid fish, but used smoked salmon as a reference to fish to induce GI cancer. Do you only think the oily fish are issues, or the low fat white fish as well?
     
  17. Travis

    Travis Member

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    Polyamines are created our cells, mostly through the enzyme ornithine decarboxylase. This enzyme is transcriptionally upregulated in a manner which reflects the cell cycle, indicating how essential polyamines are for proliferation. Exogenous polyamines (as in soy sauce) can act in the same way, mimicking the bodies own growth molecules—creating noise in the natural cell cycle.

    Bacteria also have ornithine decarboxylase, and some strains do create polyamines. Not all fermented products have polyamines, but soy sauce and fermented meat do. Meat needs the action of bacteria to produce significant amounts of polyamines.

    'Fresh fish was low in all polyamines, but apparently vulnerable to storing and preservation, since increased polyamine concentrations could be found in salted cod. Cod roe, however, was especially high in putrescine.' ―Eliassen

    Only aged and/or fermented meat would be expected to have high concentrations of polyamines.

    This link between polyamines (diamines) and cancer has been realized since Koch, and I think perhaps methylgloxal could covalently bond polyamines directly. It's well know that methylglyoxal adducts with arginine, so it must inhibit polyamine production in this way—atleast. Aldehydes such as methylglyoxal have a penchant for bonding with amines, in general—including the ortho‐phenylenediamine used to detect it. As methylglyoxal and polyamines are both natural cellular metabolites, any interaction between them would be expected to produce known cellular metabolites. The drug methylglyoxal bis guanylhydrazone inhibits polyamine synthesis, and it's tempting to think that something similar could be created endogenously (perhaps through the addition of methylgloxal with free guanidine). Whatever the case may be, the inhibition of a cancer cell's polyamine synthesis acts to decrease growth.

    'There is considerable evidence to suggest that the polyamines are involved in the regulation of cellular growth. The biosynthesis and the intracellular levels of the polyamines increase markedly lollowing treatment with various growth stimuli and then decline as the cells approach a stationary phase of growth. In fact, during the growth of a rat brain tumor cell line, polyamine biosynthesis as well as the sperlnidine content showed high positive correlations with the cellular growth rate. [...] The rate of polyamine synthesis in mammalian cells changes during the cell cycle and the cellular polyamine content increases markedly during the S, G₂ and M phases.' ―Heby

    Rats genetically‐spliced with ornithine decarboxylase next to the keratin‐5 gene form spontaneous skin cancers, even when done in a rat strain naturally resistant to skin cancers.

    William Koch, Albert Szent‐Györgi, Otto Warburg, and Linus Pauling haven't been proven wrong—perhaps on minor things but not fundamentally. On the contrary, much evidence has been compiled to vindicate nearly everything they had said—if one knows what to search for. Methylglyoxal may not work in exactly the manner Szent‐Györgi* and Koch had imagined, but there is certainly reason to think it works on other amines (besides the well‐known arginine reactions). Polyamines and methylglyoxal work in opposite directions, in the same way, like the yin–yang pair of cellular proliferation. If I find any evidence of direct methylglyoxal–polyamine interactions I will post it here.

    [1] Eliassen, Knut A. "Dietary polyamines." Food Chemistry (2002)

    [2] Heby, Olle. "Effect of methylglyoxal-bis (guanylhydrazone), an inhibitor of spermidine and spermine synthesis, on cell cycle traverse." European Journal of Cancer (1977)
    [*] Albert Szent‐Györgi had imagined that methylglyoxal bonded with the side chain amine of lysine, after which curled‐over and accepted electrons from the peptide bond thereby desaturating the protein's backbone and facilitating semiconductivity along said protein. As before microtubules were known, he imagined the peptide bond of structural proteins capable of electrical conductivity; this turned out to be little more than wishful thinking. The Thornally mechanism for methylglyoxal is interesting, and a transcriptional one: He had discovered the first instance of methylglyoxal modifying a transcription factor (at an arginyl group, of course). Koch had some things to say about carbonyls and amines reacting together—as in the case of methylglyoxal and guinidine (from the parathyroid gland), perhaps forming methylglyoxal bis guinidine—but ascribes the carcinostatic effects of dicarbonyls to their ability to destroy pathogens, primarily. I think perhaps the most pertinent mechanism for methylglyoxal could be the inhibition of the polyamine system.
     
  18. haidut

    haidut Member

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    These tend to go hand in hand and are the result of 12-14 years of brutal life in massively serotonergic environment. There is only one things that medical students learn during those 12+ years - compliance, both from doctors with professional dogmas and from patients with their doctors' orders.
    Look up IQ scores in doctors and you won't be pleased...
     
  19. Regina

    Regina Member

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    I think the hyper-validating of Drs, i.e., "a brilliant surgeon", just adds to the air of misery.
     
  20. danishispsychic

    danishispsychic Member

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    I told my Gyno that I was taking Pregnenolone and she didnt know what it was.
     
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