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Can earplugs or sound-resistant rooms have a positive effect on metabolism in certain environments ? Examining the cortisol increase for loud noises

JamesGatz

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Jun 22, 2021
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I notice that since Peating - I notice "stressors" a lot more - I cannot stand being around a construction site - hearing the sound of a jackhammer or a drill sends me to disarray or someone hammering really stresses me out

I also notice that if I'm in a party-like environment - where the speakers are usually turned up - that really stresses me out - I am also assuming because the sound is stressful in itself and that more EMF is produced when you turn the volume on the speakers up



"Noise triggers a stress response in the amygdala, a region of the brainstem. Our amygdala learns, over time, what sounds might signal impending danger. When one is detected, the amygdala triggers a release of cortisol (a stress hormone) and an involuntary startle reaction. In his book, The Universal Sense: How Hearing Shapes the Mind, neuroscientist Seth Horowitz explains, “The auditory startle circuit is a very successful evolutionary adaptation to an unseen event. It lets us get our bearings and get the hell out of there, or at least widen our attention to figure out what the noise was.”"

"Stressor exposure activates several physiological pathways that may be implicated in some of the purported health effects observed in individuals who are exposed to relatively high levels of environmental noise for several years, especially those that involve the cardiovascular system.[1,2,3] These pathways include alterations in the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis with a consequent increase in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol (corticosterone in rodents);[4,5,6] others have shown rats habituate to loud noises as evidenced by a gradual return to baseline in corticosterone levels by the fourth day of exposure.[7] Similarly, pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 1 (IL-1), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin 6 (IL-6) have been implicated in the stress response.[4,8,9]"


I notice many of the train workers in my city all instinctively wear eat plugs as the trains in my city tend to be pretty loud especially if one is spending time in one the whole day - I notice my metabolic rate lowers when I enter the train and I assume it is a combination of the horrendous lighting, EMF from the rails, and the loud noises the train makes while moving - shooting up cortisol

dnn6752-4.png

But concerning ear plugs - is it an issue that it pushes ear wax into the ear ? Maybe there is a safer way to go about it when being in an environment where loud sound is produced such as a train


"Over time, earplugs can push earwax back into your ear, causing a buildup. This can cause several problems, including temporary hearing loss and tinnitus. To clear the wax, you'll need to either use ear drops to soften it or have it removed by your doctor."



I think the safest thing to do would be to live away from large cities where noise pollution is extensive and possibly even building noise-resistant rooms in a home



"The present preference study revealed that rats were able to distinguish between different sound patterns. They showed a clear preference for silence to anything else, which may be taken as an indication that they feel disturbed by the sound from the speaker."
 

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Pina

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Oct 12, 2020
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7,069
I notice that since Peating - I notice "stressors" a lot more - I cannot stand being around a construction site - hearing the sound of a jackhammer or a drill sends me to disarray or someone hammering really stresses me out

I also notice that if I'm in a party-like environment - where the speakers are usually turned up - that really stresses me out - I am also assuming because the sound is stressful in itself and that more EMF is produced when you turn the volume on the speakers up



"Noise triggers a stress response in the amygdala, a region of the brainstem. Our amygdala learns, over time, what sounds might signal impending danger. When one is detected, the amygdala triggers a release of cortisol (a stress hormone) and an involuntary startle reaction. In his book, The Universal Sense: How Hearing Shapes the Mind, neuroscientist Seth Horowitz explains, “The auditory startle circuit is a very successful evolutionary adaptation to an unseen event. It lets us get our bearings and get the hell out of there, or at least widen our attention to figure out what the noise was.”"

"Stressor exposure activates several physiological pathways that may be implicated in some of the purported health effects observed in individuals who are exposed to relatively high levels of environmental noise for several years, especially those that involve the cardiovascular system.[1,2,3] These pathways include alterations in the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis with a consequent increase in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol (corticosterone in rodents);[4,5,6] others have shown rats habituate to loud noises as evidenced by a gradual return to baseline in corticosterone levels by the fourth day of exposure.[7] Similarly, pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 1 (IL-1), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin 6 (IL-6) have been implicated in the stress response.[4,8,9]"


I notice many of the train workers in my city all instinctively wear eat plugs as the trains in my city tend to be pretty loud especially if one is spending time in one the whole day - I notice my metabolic rate lowers when I enter the train and I assume it is a combination of the horrendous lighting, EMF from the rails, and the loud noises the train makes while moving - shooting up cortisol

View attachment 29609


But concerning ear plugs - is it an issue that it pushes ear wax into the ear ? Maybe there is a safer way to go about it when being in an environment where loud sound is produced such as a train


"Over time, earplugs can push earwax back into your ear, causing a buildup. This can cause several problems, including temporary hearing loss and tinnitus. To clear the wax, you'll need to either use ear drops to soften it or have it removed by your doctor."


I think the safest thing to do would be to live away from large cities where noise pollution is extensive and possibly even building noise-resistant rooms in a home
What's with the BOLD? it's not easy to read
 

Blossom

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9,064
I’ve been wearing them for a long time due to working nights off and on for 20ish years. When I went for a physical they commented on my large ear canals. I live in the country now with very little noise but still find it hard to fall asleep without them. I don’t really think that’s a good sign at all tbh. I just got accustomed to having to listen to loud alarms all night at work and now the slightest noise bothers me. I also wear an eye mask and have blackout curtains. Light and noise both ruin my ability to sleep.
 

Soybean

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Aug 28, 2017
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29
I think it has more to do with the stressful response due to being startled and alarmed, especially if its not so loud that it is damaging. At home I use a fan while I sleep to produce a steady calm background noise which drowns out other noises, this also makes me sleep much better.

The other day I was sleeping in a hostel room which had an automatic air freshener febreeze type dispenser, it would squirt some stuff out every 15 minutes with a mechanical sound. I would get startled and woke up whenever it went off. The day after I was extremely fatigued and irritable.

The next night I put in earplugs, and was much better.
 

Nomane Euger

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I used to get disgusting heart feelings hearing outside noices from my neighborhood and in front of my building,and even Moskitos noices,I started using ear plugs ,sleep got way better,if I don’t find my ear plugs,I don’t go to sleep up until I find them.when you are in a deep relaxed state and you experience true fatigue and loose consciousness,noices Won’t bother you at much even if you don’t have ear plugs.must have if you have moskitos flying around your head
 

JamesGatz

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I’ve been wearing them for a long time due to working nights off and on for 20ish years. When I went for a physical they commented on my large ear canals. I live in the country now with very little noise but still find it hard to fall asleep without them. I don’t really think that’s a good sign at all tbh. I just got accustomed to having to listen to loud alarms all night at work and now the slightest noise bothers me. I also wear an eye mask and have blackout curtains. Light and noise both ruin my ability to sleep.
Interesting - the ear canals got bigger ? I wonder if the hearing actually gets better when this happens so maybe something like ear plugs may make hearing better over-time - it's interesting to think about - I think all tissue in the body is subject to change when encouraged - was not aware that the plugs can have that effect though. I used to have black out curtains as well but it worked too well and what would happen is i would not want to get up in the morning if there isn't light from the windows to wake me up

I think it has more to do with the stressful response due to being startled and alarmed, especially if its not so loud that it is damaging. At home I use a fan while I sleep to produce a steady calm background noise which drowns out other noises, this also makes me sleep much better.

The other day I was sleeping in a hostel room which had an automatic air freshener febreeze type dispenser, it would squirt some stuff out every 15 minutes with a mechanical sound. I would get startled and woke up whenever it went off. The day after I was extremely fatigued and irritable.

The next night I put in earplugs, and was much better.

Interesting - I met a lot of people in school who would sleep with a fan on - I never understood it at the time until I realized I slept with an air filter on as well - I find the low, constant humming sound it makes helpful when sleeping

I used to get disgusting heart feelings hearing outside noices from my neighborhood and in front of my building,and even Moskitos noices,I started using ear plugs ,sleep got way better,if I don’t find my ear plugs,I don’t go to sleep up until I find them.when you are in a deep relaxed state and you experience true fatigue and loose consciousness,noices Won’t bother you at much even if you don’t have ear plugs.must have if you have moskitos flying around your head
Yes I notice I am significantly more calm, at peace when wearing them as well
 

Sefton10

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I’ve heard Ray say something along the lines of waking up at night at the slightest sound is a sign of being hypothyroid. I know when I’m feeling worse metabolically loud noises, especially our dog barking, feel really stressful.
 

Beastmode

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I know people who experience the benefit of using them while sleeping.

Anecdotal, but my mom experiences better balance in her gait when occluding her right ear only. She's definitely hypothyroid so it shows how it might be an impact on movement quality.
 

Kayaker

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If you wear earplugs while you're sleeping, you may be able to prevent spiders from taking up residence in your ears.

spider-headache.jpg


image
 

Pina

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Mephisto

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"Noise triggers a stress response in the amygdala, a region of the brainstem.

Spergs have an enlarged amygdala, and get very stressed from loud noise. I need to recover from bright lights and loud noise by being in a quiet place. Overactive HPA axis makes me overreact/respond with stress hormones to every little sound so I sleep best with earplugs.
hearing the sound of a jackhammer or a drill sends me to disarray or someone hammering really stresses me out
sound of crying babies drives me insane, even in a movie, have to mute it.
 

JamesGatz

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I started experimenting with ear plugs today - I feel tremendously relaxed while wearing them - feels like my serotonin lowers a lot - incredible effect - I will continue to experiment with it
 

Makrosky

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I’ve heard Ray say something along the lines of waking up at night at the slightest sound is a sign of being hypothyroid. I know when I’m feeling worse metabolically loud noises, especially our dog barking, feel really stressful.
Yes. My question to the OP would be... are you sure "Peating" is doing you good? Because hypersensibility to noises is a bad sign.
 

Explorer

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Spergs have an enlarged amygdala, and get very stressed from loud noise. I need to recover from bright lights and loud noise by being in a quiet place. Overactive HPA axis makes me overreact/respond with stress hormones to every little sound so I sleep best with earplugs.

sound of crying babies drives me insane, even in a movie, have to mute it.
What causes the enlarged amygdala and how to decrease it? Do high stress hormones in the womb cause it to adapt or what?
 

JamesGatz

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Yes. My question to the OP would be... are you sure "Peating" is doing you good? Because hypersensibility to noises is a bad sign.
I hear many people say this but I'm not sure if this is the case - when my serotonin isn't low I am not sensitive to anything - I can tolerate loud noises or smells or don't have much of a problem with anything

When my serotonin is low I notice everything - I notice people's smells, I am more reactive to loud noises, I notice EMF and stressors that I don't usually notice when my serotonin is medium/high - my mood, temps, blood, flow are good and so are my bowel movements when I am in a low serotonergic state but I do notice I am sensitive to stressors - I'm not sure if serotonin is simply masking my stressors or I'm not sure maybe I am doing something wrong but I am not really a noob to all this so I don't think I am hypometabolic - anytime I take something that lowers serotonin I begin to notice just about everything
 
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Makrosky

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I hear many people say this but I'm not sure if this is the case - when my serotonin isn't low I am not sensitive to anything - I can tolerate loud noises or smells or don't have much of a problem with anything

When my serotonin is low I notice everything - I notice people's smells, I am more reactive to loud noises, I notice EMF and stressors that I don't usually notice when my serotonin is medium/high - my mood, temps, blood, flow are good and so are my bowel movements when I am in a low serotonergic state but I do notice I am sensitive to stressors - I'm not sure if serotonin is simply masking my stressors or I'm not sure maybe I am doing something wrong but I am not really a noob to all this so I don't think I am hypometabolic - anytime I take something that lowers serotonin I begin to notice just about everything
Yeah, good points man. I remember once reading an Alexander Lowen´s book he said (I paraphrase) : "Living in any modern city requires a considerable degree of numbness of the senses to survive". So it could be.

But it could be also that you are becoming less resilent to stress? For me when I am super sensitive of everything is a bad sign. Which makes me wonder if, if we really have to live in a toxic environment, it is best to have some degree of "protective numbness".

Btw how much Thiamine HCL do you take?
 

JamesGatz

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Yeah, good points man. I remember once reading an Alexander Lowen´s book he said (I paraphrase) : "Living in any modern city requires a considerable degree of numbness of the senses to survive". So it could be.

But it could be also that you are becoming less resilent to stress? For me when I am super sensitive of everything is a bad sign. Which makes me wonder if, if we really have to live in a toxic environment, it is best to have some degree of "protective numbness".

Btw how much Thiamine HCL do you take?
Yes I agree - I think this would make sense - since I quit my job I've been avoidant of all stressors really so I think this could be the case - it makes a lot of sense - back when I was working all day I was doing fine but I was exposing myself to transit, pollution, stress with kids

For Thiamine I only do 100mg every few days or so - when I crave it - another user told me on this forum that it depleted manganese and I think I believe it because I feel my androgens lower a bit when taking a bit too much and start to crave pineapple so I do eat a lot of pineapple to replenish when I do take it. If I take it every day in the doses that users do on this forum - I think I have read maybe 300-500 mg - I start to feel anti-androgenic effects and a bit headachy so I do go easy with it
 

Makrosky

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Yes I agree - I think this would make sense - since I quit my job I've been avoidant of all stressors really so I think this could be the case - it makes a lot of sense - back when I was working all day I was doing fine but I was exposing myself to transit, pollution, stress with kids

For Thiamine I only do 100mg every few days or so - when I crave it - another user told me on this forum that it depleted manganese and I think I believe it because I feel my androgens lower a bit when taking a bit too much and start to crave pineapple so I do eat a lot of pineapple to replenish when I do take it. If I take it every day in the doses that users do on this forum - I think I have read maybe 300-500 mg - I start to feel anti-androgenic effects and a bit headachy so I do go easy with it
Thanks mate!
 

Amarsh213

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I notice that since Peating - I notice "stressors" a lot more - I cannot stand being around a construction site - hearing the sound of a jackhammer or a drill sends me to disarray or someone hammering really stresses me out

I also notice that if I'm in a party-like environment - where the speakers are usually turned up - that really stresses me out - I am also assuming because the sound is stressful in itself and that more EMF is produced when you turn the volume on the speakers up



"Noise triggers a stress response in the amygdala, a region of the brainstem. Our amygdala learns, over time, what sounds might signal impending danger. When one is detected, the amygdala triggers a release of cortisol (a stress hormone) and an involuntary startle reaction. In his book, The Universal Sense: How Hearing Shapes the Mind, neuroscientist Seth Horowitz explains, “The auditory startle circuit is a very successful evolutionary adaptation to an unseen event. It lets us get our bearings and get the hell out of there, or at least widen our attention to figure out what the noise was.”"

"Stressor exposure activates several physiological pathways that may be implicated in some of the purported health effects observed in individuals who are exposed to relatively high levels of environmental noise for several years, especially those that involve the cardiovascular system.[1,2,3] These pathways include alterations in the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis with a consequent increase in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol (corticosterone in rodents);[4,5,6] others have shown rats habituate to loud noises as evidenced by a gradual return to baseline in corticosterone levels by the fourth day of exposure.[7] Similarly, pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 1 (IL-1), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin 6 (IL-6) have been implicated in the stress response.[4,8,9]"


I notice many of the train workers in my city all instinctively wear eat plugs as the trains in my city tend to be pretty loud especially if one is spending time in one the whole day - I notice my metabolic rate lowers when I enter the train and I assume it is a combination of the horrendous lighting, EMF from the rails, and the loud noises the train makes while moving - shooting up cortisol

View attachment 29609

But concerning ear plugs - is it an issue that it pushes ear wax into the ear ? Maybe there is a safer way to go about it when being in an environment where loud sound is produced such as a train


"Over time, earplugs can push earwax back into your ear, causing a buildup. This can cause several problems, including temporary hearing loss and tinnitus. To clear the wax, you'll need to either use ear drops to soften it or have it removed by your doctor."



I think the safest thing to do would be to live away from large cities where noise pollution is extensive and possibly even building noise-resistant rooms in a home



"The present preference study revealed that rats were able to distinguish between different sound patterns. They showed a clear preference for silence to anything else, which may be taken as an indication that they feel disturbed by the sound from the speaker."
I wonder how bad Bluetooth is? Becuase I have my airpods in 24/7 at the house. Audio books and noise cancelation. I can't stand hearing TV/Neighbors or anything for that matter.

Always sleep with earbuds as well.
 

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