• Due to excessive bot signups along with nefarious actors we are limiting forum registration. Keep checking back for the register link to appear. Please do not send emails or have someone post to the forum asking for a signup link. Until the current climate changes we do not see a change of this policy. To join the forum you must have a compelling reason. Letting us know what skills/knowledge you will bring to the community along with the intent of your stay here will help in getting you approved.

Assorted news

Zsazsa

Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2016
Messages
1,500
Missing Darwin notebooks returned to Cambridge University Library
Charles Darwin’s iconic Tree of Life notebooks anonymously left in a pink gift bag, 15 months after launch of a worldwide appeal to find them

 

haidut

Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2013
Messages
18,913
Location
USA / Europe

Either meteor (as some media opined) or a warhead from an ICBM making re-entry into denser atmosphere. A falling satellite would have burned up completely at much hither altitude but it is still a possibility...especially considering Musk's recent admissions that Starlink's satellites have been falling down to Earth by the dozens over the last few months. I would not be surprised if the Russians are shooting his satellites down due to his usage of Starlink in the Ukraine war...
SpaceX says up to 40 of its new Starlink satellites are falling out of orbit

The official and "final" explanation that it was a contrail from a commercial plane is beyond absurd. The fact that a contrail is being pushed as the "legitimate" explanation, virtually guarantees that it is something else...that mainstream media does not even dare mention.
 

Zsazsa

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Nov 23, 2016
Messages
1,500
The fact that a contrail is being pushed as the "legitimate" explanation, virtually guarantees that it is something else...that mainstream media does not even dare mention.
Thanks for commenting, I agree 100% with you.
 

Zsazsa

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Nov 23, 2016
Messages
1,500

0.53.jpg

H&M’s decision to stop using cotton from China’s contentious Xinjiang region provoked a furious social-media reaction in early 2021.
[...]
The amount the brand paid in tax was not significant, and its failure to sponsor government-backed events was taken as a sign that building relations with the Chinese Communist Party—arguably the most important force in Chinese business—wasn’t a priority.
[...]
Sweden is among the countries that are most publicly critical of China. (Read more: How Keeping Quiet About Politics Helped Uniqlo Become China’s Favorite Fashion Brand)
[...]
When Chinese social-media users discovered an undated company statement expressing concern about forced labor in Xinjiang’s cotton industry—which China denies—the reaction was fast and merciless. A Weibo post by the Communist Youth League lit the touch paper: “Want to make money in China while spreading false rumors and boycotting Xinjiang cotton? Wishful thinking!”
[...]
Guangzhou civil servant Jelly Li used to like that H&M was “very easy to reach both online and offline.” But the 28-year-old and her family have now abandoned the retailer, along with Nike and Adidas.

“My husband said the whole thing that brands distort the truth about China while making money here made him furious,” Li explained.
[...]
Foreign brands regularly come under fire from nationalistic elements in China, but the pushback has intensified in recent years.
[...]
Walmart Inc., Dolce & Gabbana Srl, Mercedes-Benz Group AG and Intel Corp. all came under fire last year for how they do business in China. So far, there’s no standout example of a company recovering from such a backlash.
[...]
Nonetheless, H&M’s experience shows that in an increasingly nationalistic China, which Xi is reorienting toward the principles of old after years of opening up to the West, global brands can’t afford to ignore politics in China—or elsewhere.

“All sorts of industries and companies that probably didn’t consider themselves politically exposed have ended up in trouble,” said Andrew Gilholm, a principal focusing on Asia at consulting firm Control Risks. “Sometimes there just isn’t a neutral position.”
 

Similar threads

Top