Zinc Causing Cold Hands/feet?

Discussion in 'Supplements, Pharmaceutical Drugs' started by JDreamer, Sep 11, 2019.

  1. JDreamer

    JDreamer Member

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    Hey everyone.

    For the past couple weeks I've been using a regimen of Niacinamide, Aspirin, Selenium, Pregnenolone, and Calcium. I was doing this to work on suspected thyroid and blood sugar issues. I started noticing that my hands/feet were no longer always cold - in fact they felt nice and warm.

    I added Zinc back into the fold this morning. I've been irritable all day and my hands/feet are cold. Is it possible the Zinc is causing it?
     
  2. japanesedude

    japanesedude Member

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    zinc is not easy to digest for some people(including me) and can cause stomach gas/bloating which makes your feet and hands cold.
     
  3. BigChad

    BigChad Member

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    What dosage of zinc.
    Could be copper or iron deficiency anemia/hypothyroidism
     
  4. OP
    JDreamer

    JDreamer Member

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    It was 15mg's this morning before I left for work.
     
  5. OP
    JDreamer

    JDreamer Member

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    Interesting. I had it on an empty stomach btw.
     
  6. tara

    tara Member

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    I'd suggest taking it with food.
     
  7. OP
    JDreamer

    JDreamer Member

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    Had to have been the zinc. I didn't take it today and the cold hands/feet are gone.
     
  8. blueorca

    blueorca Member

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    Try zinc picolinate.
     
  9. BigChad

    BigChad Member

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    What is your diet like.
    Are you supplementing or eating vitamin c, vitamin a, iron, copper?

    Cold hands and feet are anemic or hypothyroid symptoms, unless theres lack of blood flow but thats rare

    I got cold hands and feet when i was supplementing zinc and vitamin c and getting very little copper and iron
     
  10. OP
    JDreamer

    JDreamer Member

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    I'm getting 2,000-3,000mg of VitC before bed. Haven't been taking VitA in quite a while.

    I've long suspected hypoT because my TSH has always been between 2-3. Then again that's why I've started supplementing selenium and aspirin i.e. pro-thyroid.
     
  11. OP
    JDreamer

    JDreamer Member

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    That's what I took though.
     
  12. BigChad

    BigChad Member

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    with that much vitamin C its probably a copper deficiency
    Selenium worsens hypothyroidism (unless you balance with iodine) unless you have autoimmune hypothyroidism

    whats your copper/iron intake
     
  13. OP
    JDreamer

    JDreamer Member

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    Well damn. I guess I'm still doing it wrong.

    I'm not supplementing any iodine, copper, or iron. I do eat red meat, eggs, and spinach at various times during the week though.
     
  14. BigChad

    BigChad Member

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    muscle meat seems somewhat low in iron compared to the organs, and has minimal copper. ive also heard freezing and cooking reduces mineral content in meat. im not sure about eggs and spinach, spinach has some vitamin c and copper though.

    i noticed when i was taking an iron/copper containing multivitamin alongside zma I did fine for the most part, but when I took out the multi and continued zma I got hypothyroid/anemic symptoms soon after
     
  15. Tristan Loscha

    Tristan Loscha Member

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    i advise against zinc picolinate.the reason for it was a misunderstanding in regard to reading the gaschromatographic output after burning.
    the actual ligand was citrate,not picolinate.chris masterjohn who is highly capable is also advising against it,based on the data on it it increased
    zinc-excretion too much.reference for zincsupplementation is zincsulphate.l-optizinc[very much similar to the sulphate] or zinc bisglycinate[not much but promising research behind it itself and glycinechelates in general.].i also advise against the citrate.
     
  16. pinacolada

    pinacolada Member

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    What about orotate
     
  17. Tristan Loscha

    Tristan Loscha Member

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    The Orotate is just not well enough researched,i believe it is non-toxic,but maybe ineffcient.Chris Masterjohn recommended the
    Product "Jarrow Zinc Balance with 15mg Zinc as L-Optizinc which is researched,and added 1mg of CopperGluconate.i used it and it was good,
    established Manufacturer also.

    The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of three zinc salts: zinc pantothenate, zinc sulfate and zinc orotate
    G Andermann, M Dietz
    European journal of drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics 7 (3), 233-239, 1982
    In this study the authors compared the pharmacokinetics of three zinc salts after parenteral and oral administration to rabbits: zinc sulfate, a soluble mineral salt; zinc pantothenate, a soluble organic salt; and zinc orotate, an insoluble organic salt. The results obtained with the two soluble salts were not significantly different (p<0.05). Therefore they appear to be bioequivalent. The plasma concentration curve for zinc orotate shows a faster distribution (α) and elimination phase (α) after parenteral administration, and a slower absorption phase (Ka) after oral administration, when compared with that of the other two salts. It was shown that the dissolution behaviour of these zinc salts in water does not correlate with the parameters foundin vivo.
     
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