Wisdom Teeth Extraction

Discussion in 'Oral Health' started by j., Dec 19, 2012.

  1. tara

    tara Member

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    I don't think you have to make a quick decision.
    My guess is, what ever you are doing that is allowing them to emerge is probably a good thing. How about giving it a bit more time and seeing where it goes to? If they end up cramped and impacted when things stop moving, make a decision then. If they are not over-cramped, or other specific problems, I see no reason to remove them. If your jaw is changing it may eventually accommodate them OK.

    I still have mine, though with fillings. My teeth have always been in terrible shape, and I have a feeling that as I get older, the more teeth I keep the better. :)
     
  2. tara

    tara Member

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    PS. It could be that orthodontics messed with you. But it could also be that your metabolism was underperforming in some way, and that's why your teeth were a target for orthodontistry (is that a word?) in the first place, as well as contributing to other issues?
     
  3. milk

    milk Member

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    I'm pretty sure my teeth were fine. I don't remember them being particularly crooked. I think my parents were sweet-talked into making me get braces.

    As the poor fellow who wrote this book https://books.google.com.br/books?id=nw ... ty&f=false attests, dentists often convince parents to make their children get braces even when they don't need them at all.

    I'm not a fan of the "perfect teeth" look. And when you factor in the potential bad consequences of orthodontics, it doesn't make any sense.

    I found a bunch of articles like this one: http://www.westonaprice.org/holistic-he ... it-dental/. This really rings a bell. The "sympathetic overload" bit, particularly. And those bad posture pics? Yeah, I do that too. I think my jaw is pushing against my airway.

    The before and after pics in several of those articles. Beautiful kids who look all weird after a few years of orthodontics. It's really sad.

    The guy wants me to get x-rays too. I know what Peat thinks about them. But it would be good to have a clear picture of what's going on with my teeth, jaws and airway. Would the X-rays be worth the risk as a one time thing?

    I might make a thread about this. I want to tackle this issue the right way.
     
  4. tara

    tara Member

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    Up to you to decide, but I have ome thoughts.
    I think the only benefit to x-rays would be either if you have active decay that needs treating but that is hard to see directly without x-rays, or if you get persistent distress in those wisdom teeth. Other than that, just knowing for it's own sake might be interesting, but maybe doesn't justify the x-ray hit. I'd say, save the one time x-ray thing for when you need it, not just curiousity.
    I think you should be able to get a bit of information about the overall jaw shape, alignment, and relationship with airway without x-rays from someone knowledgable in that area. It's not that hidden.

    Personally I still succumb to regular x-rays because I've always had a lot of decay, and the dentist regularly finds a mess to fill. Hate the x-rays, but I've so far figured it's the lesser evil.
     
  5. milk

    milk Member

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    Okay, thanks. Cancer risks seem to be pretty high indeed for x-rays? I searched the forum and it's what I gather.

    But if I did have x-rays of my teeth and jaws I could scan them and email them to knowledgeable doctors instead of having to rely on Brazilian shill doctors... Hm...
     
  6. tara

    tara Member

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    I think Peat has also said ionising radiation messes with bones as well - he's talked about it as counterproductive in the context of osteoporosis. If you've got some possibly good things happening with jaw development at the moment, seems a shame to mess with that unnecessarily.

    I don't think I understand what you mean by this part. Are you thinking extracting wisdom teeth would help somehow?

    Are you thinking there is airway obstruction because you are struggling with establishing nasal breathing? I don't discount the possibility that there is some structural impediment, but I think it is common for mouthbreathing to be self-reinforcing because it tends to cause swelling and congestion in the nasal passages even without structural deviations.
    I used to think I breathed through my mouth because my nose was blocked. Now I think my nose was blocked because I breathed through my mouth. In my case it was retrainable. Have you had a go at it from this angle?
     
  7. milk

    milk Member

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    Hey, I'm not mouthbreather.

    But my breathing feels slightly strained. When I project my lower jaw forward, I breathe better. I did this recently -- I had never thought of it before -- after my first or second day on cypro. I had a dream about my teeth, and when I woke up I got the idea of projecting my lower jaw forward. I did so, and took a breath through my nose. It was sort of like taking a first breath of air after being submerged in water. Not that my normal breathing is that bad. But I realized it was certainly being obstructed a bit.

    When I do the Mike Mew "lips together, teeth together, tongue on the roof of the mouth" thing I breathe better too. I think the braces narrowed the space in my mouth, leaving less space for my tongue.

    I tend to do this with my head,

    [​IMG]

    which, again, according to http://www.westonaprice.org/holistic-he ... it-dental/, where that picture is from, can be due to an orthodontic treatment induced obstructed airway. As it were.

    Anyway, I'm not getting the x-rays for now. Thanks for the replies.
     
  8. tara

    tara Member

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    I guess retraining posture could be helpful, then. That's a pretty common habit, with or without orthodontics.
     
  9. Rafael Lao Wai

    Rafael Lao Wai Member

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    Braces definitely narrow the palate. When I decided to get rid of my braces, my tongue would get some marks because, when it was in the roof of the mouth, it was going against the teeth. Now I can put my entire tongue on the roof of the mouth without problems. Also, my septum deviation has improved so much. Mewing totally works. At first, it is kinda stressful, since you have to consciously keep a good mouth posture, but it becomes normal after a few weeks. Braces are always bad, in my opinion. I'm still undoing the damage caused by them, but I'm getting better and better. That positioin is commonly known as "nerd neck", and most young people stand like that, since they have to sit still during hours everyday due to school.
     
  10. Rafael Lao Wai

    Rafael Lao Wai Member

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    It's hard to keep a good tongue posture without sitting and walking straight, so because of many negative influences of the modern world, people normally don't have a good tongue posture.
     
  11. Rafael Lao Wai

    Rafael Lao Wai Member

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    Doctor Mike Mew has talked about how a recessed chin blocks the airway leading to poor breathing and also to snoring. My father has a recessed chin and has a very bad case of "nerd neck". He snores a lot while sleeping. If the jaw is protruding backwards, it would make sense that the wisdom teeth would make that situation worse, but that isn't a good justification to remove them. Every teeth is invaluable. What must be done is to bring the jaw forward, that way your appearance improves, as well as your breathing. And to bring the jaw forward, you need to bring the maxila forward as well, so mewing helps with that. A palate expansion device could be used as well. I would be interested in using one eventually.
     
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