What Has Helped You The Most For Hypoglycemia?

Discussion in 'Health' started by extremecheddar, Nov 13, 2015.

  1. extremecheddar

    extremecheddar Member

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    I have tried b vitamins, glycine , taurine, k2, caffeine, starch, sugar, fat, pepicid, frequent eating, intermittent fasting, and nothing seems to be working. Is just getting worse.

    For those who have had recurrent hypoglycemia, what has helped you the most?
     
  2. ravster02

    ravster02 Member

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    clonidine 50mcg a day
     
  3. Nicholas

    Nicholas Member

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    how long have you had this issue and when did you start trying to treat it?
     
  4. OP
    extremecheddar

    extremecheddar Member

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    I started to notice this a year ago and that was about 8 months into my peat eating. I noticed I could go less time in between meals. I started noticing If I felt a hungry I would need to get something in me quick. Before, I could feel a little hungry and still go a while before needing to eat. I delt with this for about another 6-8 months by just keeping food with me at all times but It continued to get worse. I was drinking alcohol on the weekends and i noticed this making it much worse. A couple of months ago I stopped drinking which helped a little. This is about the same time I got serious about treating it.

    I felt that fruit and fruit juice were not helping so I cut back on those and replaced with starch. Fruit, Juices, and sugar began giving me sharp pains in my liver/pancreas area. Alcohol was giving me the same pain. I still feel like food moves through me too fast and I don't absorb anything from it.
     
  5. Derek

    Derek Guest

    The perceived "Peat Diet" isn't very satiating. Too many liquids and sugar. Fruit Juice and sugar increase your appetite because they lower blood sugar, you need to eat constantly to be full. This may not be peaty but in terms of starches, wheat was the one that kept my blood sugar stable the most. Eating white bread or white flour pancakes with a little SFA kept me full for a long time (white rice and potatoes didn't do that nearly as well). Also, oatmeal really helped with keeping me full/satiated. PUFA also can sometimes be helpful for keeping blood sugar stable. Maybe try eating a handful of peanuts or almonds in between meals and see how that works for you.
     
  6. YuraCZ

    YuraCZ Member

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    every 3 hours balanced meal carbs/fats/protein and some fiber.
     
  7. Derek

    Derek Guest

    He already said that he tried frequent eating? If you have to eat every 2-3 hours to keep blood sugar stable, then what do you do at bedtime? I read of a lot of people here waking up in the middle of the night with low blood sugar. The typical advice is just keep some simple sugar (honey, dates, fruit juice) at your bedside, so when you wake up to low blood sugar/high stress hormones you can alleviate it with simple sugar. I guess if that works for you. Not like you gave bad advice btw, at least you didn't tell him to take drugs.
     
  8. YuraCZ

    YuraCZ Member

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    I don't need food when I sleep. I have no problem with 12 hours fasting, but when I move I will need fuel ideally every 3 hours at least..
     
  9. Brian

    Brian Member

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    A high sugar diet isn't satiating until you fix insulin resistance and fatty liver issues that inhibit proper fructose metabolism. When you finally do, eating sugar + protein will feel fantastic and give constant energy and well being all day without any hypoglycemia even if you miss a meal.

    But it may take some work to get there. I agree that refined salty flour product starch with a little saturated fat is a better way to get started at improving metabolism for most people. That should reduce cortisol so other factors of health like insulin resistance and liver health can be worked on more effectively.

    I disagree on the usefulness of PUFA though. If you need a snack in between meals things like no-PUFA pretzels, homemade or storebought no-PUFA french fries work well in my experience.
     
  10. Peata

    Peata Member

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    That has been my experience. I couldn't tolerate high sugar before without blood sugar swings, discomfort, hunger, etc. Now I am usually over-satisfied on the high sugar, moderate protein, low fat way that I find it hard to eat as much as I should. I attribute the change to several things including my caffeine use over the last couple months.
     
  11. Derek

    Derek Guest

    I am similar to you, I just don't need fuel that frequently. Oatmeal with eggs, maple syrup, and cream for breakfast. Rice with beef, broccoli, and butter for dinner. Pancakes for a snack or boiled potatoes with cheese. 3-4 meals a day like this for me. So I don't disagree with your advice generally, but like I said in my post the oatmeal keeps me full for 5-6 hours. He wanted to know what works for others, and Oatmeal really helps with blood sugar swings for me, as well as wheat (like I mentioned).
     
  12. Derek

    Derek Guest

    So I guess he can try to fix his issues with caffeine? But that doesn't work for everyone. Clearly you can see that on this site. I have read many posts of people trying high dose K2 and caffeine and still can't fix their sugar issues. Since he has been "Peating" for a long time, I just wanted to give an alternative view. If we conclude that he has insulin resistance and fatty liver, then eating simple sugars is not that good of an idea. Which is why I recommended starch. Caffeine lowers blood sugar. I don't know why you would recommend that to someone with hypoglycemia. Plus he said he already experimented with caffeine.

    I know lot's of people who do real well on almonds and peanuts (butter or whole). There isn't a one size fits all approach to diet. That narrow way of thinking is what gets people into trouble.
     
  13. Derek

    Derek Guest

    I am glad that caffeine worked for you and Brian, but the OP said he already tried that. Maybe he can elaborate on how long he did it?
     
  14. OP
    extremecheddar

    extremecheddar Member

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    I regret the day I stopped eating wheat. It helped to stop eating it temporarily but in the long run I think I was healthier when I was eating it vs now. It promoted healthy bowl movements and steady energy. Not to mention I could never get tired of bread or wheat based meals. Now the idea of fruit, tubers, and other peat carb sources are unappetizing because i've eaten so much of them.

    Where i'm at now, I don't think I could tolerate wheat or many other normal foods but restrictive low carb paleo is first to blame for that. However Peating has barely helped to get over food sensitivities also.
     
  15. OP
    extremecheddar

    extremecheddar Member

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    I tried caffeine for about 5 days, I worked my way up to about two 50mg doses a day. Then I ate something that made me throw up one night and never started it back up.
     
  16. Brian

    Brian Member

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    I don't think anyone should force feed fruit or white sugar if it's not metabolizing or make it their dominant calorie source. Starch is clearly the better alternative in that situation.

    I'm pretty sure the main thing that improved my glucose metabolism (and actually fat as well) was getting my magnesium to be retained in the cell so that ATP would be maximized. And for that I think progesterone needs to be increased somehow. Spending most of the day in a very bright room or being outdoors as much as possible seemed to be sufficient for me.
     
  17. Peata

    Peata Member

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    I think getting the liver healthier would help with blood sugar swings. It seems to have helped this some in my case because of now being able to tolerate the higher sugar, low fat diet, which I believe I can tolerate now because of the caffeine. It's sort of a chain of repairs, but I think it comes down to having a healthier liver. :2cents
     
  18. jyb

    jyb Member

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    I really recognise myself in that post. I fixed that by increasing my sat fat and being more careful about how/when/which carbs I ate. The solution to control hunger and glycaemia for people like me is not necessarily to keep increasing sugar when there is a sign of stress. It can make it worse but it reversible. I think it's tempting to make that mistake, because once you get hungry and hypoglycaemic like, some carbs can fix it so you keep doing it. However it doesn't solve the problem, because such hunger and stress should never have occurred in the first place. Never, it just shouldn't. After a year of reading (and practicing) about fat versus glucoses metabolisms, I conclude that there is a sweet spot. For me it's a lot lower than what I previously ate with tons of orange juice.
     
  19. OP
    extremecheddar

    extremecheddar Member

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    I have gone back and forth between low fat and higher fat. I get benefits and problems with both. Right now i'm using moderate amounts just enough to cook or moisten what I'm eating.

    I miss the "ignorance is bliss" of eating whatever I felt like and not considering the health implications. Nowadays you can make a very decent argument for and against every single food know to exitance.
    You can find studies or make arguments that show that SAT. fat is good or bad. Same with sugar, starch, fiber, protien, ect....
     
  20. cantstoppeating

    cantstoppeating Member

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    Low fat, high carb, moderate protein.

    Potatoes, spinach, gelatin, sugar.
     
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