What Happens To Fruit When We Cook Them?

Discussion in 'Fruits' started by postman, Mar 7, 2019.

  1. postman

    postman Member

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    What changes occur? Does the fiber change? Soluble/fermantable fiber vs insoluble/fermentable fiber, is there any change there? Starch turns into sugar? Do you personally think cooked fruit is more easily digested?
     
  2. TeaRex14

    TeaRex14 Member

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    I guess it depends on what fruits you're talking about. I find cooking apples and pears makes them more digestible, their fiber becomes more tolerable.
     
  3. OP
    postman

    postman Member

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    Interesting. I seem to have a problem digesting fruit fiber (and fermentable fiber in general) but I haven't tried having it cooked yet.
     
  4. TeaRex14

    TeaRex14 Member

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    Yeah I think the problem is probably related to the fact most of our fruits are shelf ripened and not tree ripened. Ray has spoken about this before. Papayas, mangoes, guavas, kiwi, grapes, cherries, blueberries, raspberries, melons, and OJ seem to digest fine for me in their raw state. Apples, pears, strawberries, and bananas need cooking. So you may need to play around with different fruits, see which ones digest the best for you.
     
  5. RayPeatFan777

    RayPeatFan777 Member

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    Bump. Does cooked under-ripe fruit still feed bad bacteria?
     
  6. aquaman

    aquaman Member

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    Definitely make it easier. I find eg leaving u ripened pears or kiwi fruit for 2-3 days after buying, helps to ripen them. Then may stew them a bit after if still needed, with a bit of added sugar
     
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