What Good Stuff Does Coffee Have Apart From Caffeine?

Discussion in 'Coffee' started by Bluebell, Apr 3, 2015.

  1. Bluebell

    Bluebell Member

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    I made the switch to coffee finally! I'm drinking it and seemingly have no ill effects ... I think I might be a convert.

    I know that coffee is highly recommended by Ray, and there is a lot of research about it's healthy effects. But I was wondering what it is that makes coffee so health-promoting. I mean, would caffeine pills have the same effect?

    The polyphenols and tannins are a negative I think, as they are toxic according to Ray I believe. The tannins are only useful for blocking iron.
     
  2. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/caffeine.shtml
     
  3. OP
    Bluebell

    Bluebell Member

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    Ah yes, I forgot about the magnesium and some B vitamins. Less cadmium, OK.

    I feel there must be more to it that that though ... more things in coffee to create these fantastic health benefits ...
     
  4. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    I think coffee actually holds on to magnesium in some amount. Niacin as well, it should be the same reason why people started boiling flour before using it.
     
  5. OP
    Bluebell

    Bluebell Member

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    Do you mean there is actually a net effect of less magnesium (and niacin) in the body after drinking the coffee?
     
  6. thebigpeatowski

    thebigpeatowski Member

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    I think the bitter properties of coffee are good for the liver, just my opinion tho.

    I'm so glad you are enjoying it Bluebell :coffee
     
  7. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    It should just be a matter of not getting the magnesium that's in the coffee and perhaps the foods that you eat with it.
     
  8. OP
    Bluebell

    Bluebell Member

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    Yes I must admit I've never felt that the mineral/vitamin content is something to rely on in coffee, Such_S.

    Thanks bigpeatowski, I really am enjoying it a lot! I am having lattes made with instant. No other supplements except aspirin & taurine right now, and my energy, dare I say it, is good.
     
  9. janus

    janus Member

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    I think polyphenols are increasingly destroyed with the degree of roasting. Trigonelline is also increasingly converted to niacin with the degree of roasting.

    There are also the terpenes, cafestol and kahweol, which are lost in paper filtration.
     
  10. Samurai Drive

    Samurai Drive Member

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  11. fradon

    fradon Member

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    lowers uric acid, helps liver and gall bladder
     
  12. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    Binds iron. Blocks absorption.
     
  13. Samurai Drive

    Samurai Drive Member

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  14. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    There was a recent study on post-operative cognitive decline and it showed how drinking 3 coffees a day helped to improve health and recovery. The punch line is that the coffee didn’t have to be caffeinated. In fact decaf may have worked better.

    Effect of Coffee on the Length of Postoperative Ileus After Elective Laparoscopic Left-Sided Colectomy: A Randomized, Prospective Single-Center Study. - PubMed - NCBI
    BACKGROUND:
    Postoperative ileus is common problem after colorectal surgery. A positive effect of coffee to bowel movement has been described. It is still unclear whether coffee decreases the risk of postoperative ileus.

    OBJECTIVE:
    The purpose of this study was to determine whether consuming a 100-mL cup of coffee is effective in preventing or reducing postoperative ileus.

    DESIGN:
    This was a prospective, single-center, randomized controlled study.

    SETTINGS:
    The study was conducted at a university teaching hospital.

    PATIENTS:
    All of the patients who were scheduled for elective laparoscopic left-sided colectomy at our hospital after the detection of malignant disease in a preoperative biopsy between January 2013 and December 2014 entered the study. The patients were assigned randomly before surgery to receive coffee with caffeine (first group), coffee without caffeine (second group), or water (third group) after the procedure (100 mL 3 times daily).

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:
    The primary end point was time to first bowel movement; secondary end points were time to first flatus and time to tolerance of solid food.

    RESULTS:
    A total of 105 patients were randomly assigned, 35 to each group. Fifteen patients were excluded. Patient demographic characteristics were similar in the groups. The time until the first bowel movement (measured in days) was significantly (p < 0.05) shorter in the decaffeinated coffee group (3.00 ± 1.50) versus the coffee with caffeine (3.75 ± 1.53) and water groups (4.14 ± 1.14). The time until tolerance of solid food was significantly shorter in decaffeinated group versus coffee with caffeine and water groups (1.85 versus 2.60 and 2.80; p < 0.05). Time until the first flatus (1.47 versus 1.57 and 1.77 for decaffeinated coffee versus coffee with caffeine and water; p > 0.05) did not show statistical significance. Postoperative hospital stay was similar in all 3 of the groups.

    LIMITATIONS:
    This is a single-center study with a relatively small sample size.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    Coffee consumption after colectomy was safe and in the decaffeinated group associated with a reduced time to first bowel action. Caffeine is not a main ingredient affecting the length of postoperative ileus.
     
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