What Evidence Shows Estrogen To Be A Cause Of Hair Loss?

Elephanto

Member
Joined
May 21, 2015
Messages
820
An high IGF1/IGFBP-3 ratio is predictive of baldness. Estrogen increases IGF-1 and inhibits IGFBP-3.

Increasing IGF-1 by a single standard deviation increases balding risks by 31%. Increasing IGFBP-3 by a single standard deviation decreases balding risks by 38%.

https://www.mcgill.ca/pollak-lab/fi...ing_plasma_insulin_like_growth_factor_1_0.pdf

Estradiol, progesterone, and transforming growth factor alpha regulate insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP3) expression in mouse en... - PubMed - NCBI

In these two studies, they find High Estrogen and Cortisol in balding men :
Hormonal basis of male and female androgenic alopecia: clinical relevance. - PubMed - NCBI

Hormonal parameters in androgenetic hair loss in the male. - PubMed - NCBI

The cascade often starts before Estrogen. Endotoxins and/or Serotonin promote chronically high Cortisol which promotes Estrogen synthesis. Cortisol promotes DHT. DHEA-S which is significantly higher in balding men is a marker of stress. Inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins also induce aromatase expression and estrogen synthesis.

Serum elevation of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate associated with male pattern baldness in young men. - PubMed - NCBI

Acute and chronic stress increase DHEAS concentrations in rhesus monkeys

Zinc, which is anti-estrogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-cortisol and inhibits Nitric Oxide is significantly lower in all types of hair loss, including male pattern baldness.

Analysis of Serum Zinc and Copper Concentrations in Hair Loss

http://www.ijdvl.com/article.asp?is...ssue=6;spage=741;epage=741;aulast=Aiempanakit
 

rawmeat

Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2018
Messages
149
^ Very good post @Elephanto . Also, observe young balding guys when you are out. They have many estrogenic features - hairy, water retentive, gyno...
 

SuperiorFatties

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Sep 6, 2018
Messages
46
That's really poor evidence, though. Zinc is hardly an 'anti-estrogen', and doesn't really deal with hair loss, it just helped in some particular cases (like a woman with hypothyroidism). Serum concentrations in bald people don't say much about an actual cause. There are some case studies about ethinylestradiol regrowing hair, and some people have success with that.
 

Elephanto

Member
Joined
May 21, 2015
Messages
820
Aromatase, Endotoxins, Cortisol and the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 promote Estrogen synthesis. Zinc has inhibiting effects on all of them. Zinc also antagonizes Copper (preventing excess) and Copper is estrogenic. It also competes with Cadmium, prevents testicular damage from Lead and Aluminium, and these 3 metals are classified as metalloestrogens with known estrogenic effects. Zinc is low in prostate cancer which Estrogen promotes, and bald men have significantly higher risks of aggressive prostate cancer.
 
Last edited:

SuperiorFatties

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Sep 6, 2018
Messages
46
Okay so zinc inhibits some of estrogen's actions but it's not an 'anti-estrogen'. It does a whole lot of things, making the argument rather speculative. Does it actually lower cortisol btw? some study found no change in salivary levels when supplementing :
The effect of zinc supplementation on salivary cortisol levels and salivary amylase activity in primary school children with low socioeconomic status

@Arrade Interesting article, citation 8 is a case study on diethylstilbesterol, a synthetic estrogen. It's a patient with alopecia areata that discontinued its use when he experienced hair loss and other adverse effects.

Citations 9-10 refer to the same piece of evidence (Gardner and DeVita, '40). Citation 9 is a book which talks a great deal about estrogen's role in hair growth and points at inhibitive effects. Estrogen's effect were partly dependent on corticoids though it also produced local effects. Looks like much better evidence, but it's in rats.

Gardner's study is in dogs :
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2602505/

One citation, on oral contraceptives and alopecia, reads (the full study is in Spanish) :
"5 cases of diffuse alopecia in women who took oral contraceptives are studied. 3 cases developed male pattern baldness during the time they were taking the pills. 2 cases began losing their hair after having stopped medication and these resembled postpartum baldness. 1 woman did not regain her hair 20 months after having stopped medication . The effects of female sex hormones on hair follicles are discussed. Contraceptives induce a condition of pseudopregnancy, and should be considered as possible toxic causes of alopecia. However, the incidence of alopecia among users of oral contraceptives is very low."
(the other citation on oral contraceptives is about diffuse hair loss)

Can you further explain the prostaglandin part? Estrogen increases PGE2, and PGD2 inhibits hair growth and is found elevated in balding scalps? What's the problem with that?

This study (human hair follicles in vitro) also saw inhibition of hair growth (both by estrogen and testosterone) :
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2078048

Some contradictory studies in humans :
https://www.popline.org/node/510306 (German, topical application of estrogen and corticoids)
https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-81650-5_47 (don't have access to full paper)
https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/76497 (menopausal women, AGA)
 

Elephanto

Member
Joined
May 21, 2015
Messages
820
@SuperiorFatties
Zinc in the form of supplements requires high doses to change serum Zinc levels. Your study uses a poorly absorbed form at 15mg, only Zinc Picolinate was shown to significantly alter levels (in 50-100mg range). Picolinic Acid increases Zinc absorption and Vitamin B6 also increases Picolinic Acid in the system.

In my experience, it is potently dopaminergic and anti-cortisol but the effect is much less after long-term Zinc repletion.

Zinc acutely and temporarily inhibits adrenal cortisol secretion in humans. A preliminary report. - PubMed - NCBI

Takeda et al. [44] reported that a zinc-deficient diet induced high levels of serum cortisol concentration in rats.
Zinc, Magnesium, Selenium and Depression: A Review of the Evidence, Potential Mechanisms and Implications

Zinc Seems To Acutely Reduce Prolactin
(Dopamine inhibits Prolactin and Cortisol)

The Dopamine transporter requires Zinc-related enzymes.

It is literally an anti-estrogen too.
showed a significantly higher level of estrogen receptor in zinc-deficient rats (36.6 +/- 3.4 fmol/mg protein) than in pair-fed controls (23.3 +/- 2.2 fmol/mg protein) and a significantly lower level of androgen binding sites in rats fed the zinc-deficient diet (6.7 +/- 0.7 fmol/mg protein) than in pair-fed control rats (11.3 +/- 1.2 fmol/mg protein).
Dietary zinc deficiency alters 5 alpha-reduction and aromatization of testosterone and androgen and estrogen receptors in rat liver. - PubMed - NCBI
 

Elephanto

Member
Joined
May 21, 2015
Messages
820
the problem is,you can't actually take Zinc everyday.
since it can oxidize vitamins.
How ?

It's an antioxidant
Zinc is an Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Agent: Its Role in Human Health
Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of zinc. Zinc-dependent NF-κB signaling
Metallothionein protects against oxidative stress-induced lysosomal destabilization. - PubMed - NCBI

Metallothioneins require Zinc for function and are low in brain oxidation diseases like Alzheimer's. They are required to bind free copper and protect against Iron-induced oxidative damage.
 

japanesedude

Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2017
Messages
497
I've read on other thread that 'RP said supplemental zinc could oxidize vitamins in the intestine.'
'For that reason, according to him, no more than 10mg of zinc ( either sulfate or gluconate) should be used and for a period of 10 days max.'
 

Elephanto

Member
Joined
May 21, 2015
Messages
820
I've read on other thread that 'RP said supplemental zinc could oxidize vitamins in the intestine.'
'For that reason, according to him, no more than 10mg of zinc ( either sulfate or gluconate) should be used and for a period of 10 days max.'

The recommended form advice is weird to begin with, since forms other than Picolinate have been shown to be completely ineffective at affecting Zinc levels.
At the end of four weeks hair, urine and erythrocyte zinc levels rose significantly (p less than 0.005, p less than 0.001, and p less than 0.001) during zinc picolinate administration. There was no significant change in any of these parameters from zinc gluconate, zinc citrate or placebo administration.
Comparative absorption of zinc picolinate, zinc citrate and zinc gluconate in humans. - PubMed - NCBI
Effect of iron, vitamin B-6 and picolinic acid on zinc absorption in the rat. - PubMed - NCBI
It also requires more than 50mg of Picolinate to have an effect on serum levels, although this is trumped by average diets that include phytic acid and gut irritants that cause intestinal permeability, reducing absorption of minerals. Zinc itself shows efficacy in restoring intestinal barrier integrity, and deficiency causes intestinal permeability.

Perhaps one should take it several hours away from meals to avoid the oxidation he mentions (can't find it happening in studies though), but 10mg is definitely not enough when it comes to protection against hair loss and regrowth. Personally I have almost always taken it away from meals with a sip of Apple Cider Vinegar, usually when I woke up and did IF; mainly because the isolated effect seemed more potent than with meals. It acted like a nootropic to go to class/work when I had more social anxiety, completely eliminated stress.
 
Last edited:

SuperiorFatties

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Sep 6, 2018
Messages
46
Is there any convincing research on zinc and alopecia? On fora some report decreased shedding.
In any case, even if there is research, the therapeutic benefit could be due to any of the countless effects zinc has on the body (like its effects on prolactin in the study you just shared).

In this study copper deficiency was more common than zinc deficiency :
Prevalence of Nutritional Deficiencies in Hair Loss among Indian Participants: Results of a Cross-sectional Study. - PubMed - NCBI
The low levels in hair, plasma, ... say little to nothing.

In a group of females zinc increased hair thickness more than minoxidil, but the latter was more effective at increasing hair density :
Comparing the Effects of Zinc Sulfate, Calcium Pantothenate, Their Combination and Minoxidil Solution Regimens on Controlling Hair Loss in Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial
There are seasonal variations in hair loss, the sample sizes were small, and there were more limitations to the study aside from the fact that the results weren't very impressive to begin with.

JRPP-6-89-g003.jpg

There's also a study (easily googled) demonstrating benefits in alopecia areata.
 

SuperiorFatties

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Sep 6, 2018
Messages
46
Ray Peat's take :

There are several ways that estrogen can be involved in hair and scalp function. One is by way of mast cells, that are increased by estrogen, and that have a role in hair loss.

J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1983 Jan 1;182(1):63-4.
Diethylstilbestrol-induced alopecia in a dog.
Barsanti JA, Medleau L, Latimer K.

Vet Dermatol. 2015 Oct;26(5):393-6, e90-1.
Estradiol-induced alopecia in five dogs after contact with a transdermal gel used
for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms in women.
Wiener DJ(1)(2), Rüfenacht S(3), Koch HJ(4), Mauldin EA(5), Mayer U(6), Welle
MM(1)(2).
(1)Institute of Animal Pathology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern,
Länggassstrasse 122, PO Box 8466, 3001, Bern, Switzerland.
(2)DermFocus, Vetsuisse Faculty, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital,
Freiburgstrasse 14, 3010, Bern, Switzerland.
(3)Dermavet, Tierklinik Aarau West, Muhenstrasse 56, 5036, Oberentfelden,
Switzerland.
(4)Tierklinik Birkenfeld, Am Schönenwald, 55765, Birkenfeld, Germany.
(5)Department of Pathobiology, Anatomic Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine,
University of Pennsylvania, 3900 Delancey Street, MJR VHUP 4037, Philadelphia,
PA, 19104-6051, USA.
(6)Tierärztliche Fachklinik für Kleintiere, Klinkerberg 1-3, 86152, Augsburg,
Germany.
BACKGROUND: Noninflammatory alopecia is a frequent problem in dogs.
Estrogen-induced alopecia is well described in dogs, with estrogen producing
testicular tumors and canine female hyperestrogenism.
OBJECTIVES: To increase awareness that extensive alopecia in dogs can be caused
by exposure to estradiol gel used by owners to treat their postmenopausal
symptoms.
ANIMALS: Skin biopsies from five dogs with extensive alopecia were examined.
METHODS: Owners were asked for a thorough case history, including possible
exposure to an estradiol gel. Complete blood work and serum chemistry panel
analysis were performed to investigate possible underlying causes. Formalin-fixed
skin biopsy samples were obtained from lesional skin and histopathology was
performed.
RESULTS: All owners confirmed the use of a transdermal estradiol gel and close
contact with the affected dogs before development of alopecia. Histopathologic
examination showed a similar picture in all five dogs. Most hair follicles were
predominantly either in kenogen or telogen and hair follicle infundibula showed
mild to moderate dilation. Hair regrowth was present in all five dogs after the
exposure to the estradiol gel was stopped or minimized. Blood work and serum
chemistry panel were within normal limits in all cases. One dog had elevated
estradiol concentrations, whereas in another dog estradiol concentrations were
within normal limits.
CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Alopecia can occur after contact with a
transdermal gel used as treatment for postmenopausal symptoms in women. Estradiol
gel used by female owners therefore represents a possible cause for
noninflammatory alopecia in dogs. Estradiol concentrations are not necessarily
elevated in affected dogs.
© 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

J Am Anim Hosp Assoc. 2015 Mar-Apr;51(2):136-42.
Canine alopecia secondary to human topical hormone replacement therapy in six
dogs.
Berger DJ(1), Lewis TP, Schick AE, Miller RI, Loeffler DG.
(1)From the Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Ames, IA
(D.B.); Dermatology for Animals (T.L., A.S., R.M.); and DVM Pathology Associates
(D.L.).
Alopecia is a common presenting complaint in veterinary medicine and is known to
occur secondary to numerous primary conditions. In this report, six unrelated
dogs from three households were subsequently determined to have developed
alopecia as a result of accidental transdermal exposure to their owners' topical
hormone replacement therapy (THRT). All cases presented with alopecia ranging in
duration from 2 mo to 2.5 yr. All dogs demonstrated alopecia affecting the
ventral neck, thoracic and abdominal surfaces, proximal lateral extremities, and
lateral trunk. At the time of initial presentation, five of six dogs were also
noted to have physical exam findings suggestive of feminization. In all cases,
serum total thyroxine was within normal reference range. Affected skin was
biopsied in five dogs, and all samples demonstrated four similar histological
characteristics: basal melanosis, epidermal and infundibular follicular
hyperkeratosis, kenogen hair follicles, and small sebaceous glands. All dogs had
elevated baseline estradiol levels, and four dogs had concurrent elevations of
baseline progesterone. Average time to onset of clinical signs in those dogs was
5.5 mo after the owners started THRT. Following discontinuation of THRT by the
owners, all dogs had complete resolution of their clinical signs by 5.5 mo.

Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2014 Jan 16.
Differential associations of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and estradiol with
physical, metabolic and health-related factors in community-dwelling men aged
17-97 years from the Busselton Health Survey.
Yeap BB(1), Knuiman MW, Divitini ML, Handelsman DJ, Beilby JP, Beilin J,
McQuillan B, Hung J.
(1)School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth,
Western Australia; Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Fremantle Hospital,
Fremantle, Western Australia.
OBJECTIVES: Lower testosterone (T) levels are associated with poorer health
outcomes in older men, but associations in younger or middle-aged men are
uncertain and data for dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and estradiol (E2) are limited.
We assessed associations of circulating T, DHT and E2 with physical and
health-related factors in a cohort comprising men aged 17-97 years.
PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Serum from 2,143 community-dwelling men from the
1994/95 Busselton Health Survey was assayed for T, DHT and E2 using liquid
chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Men receiving hormonal therapy, or with
prostate cancer or orchidectomy were excluded.
RESULTS: Of the men 43% had never smoked, 6.1% had diabetes and 16.8%
cardiovascular disease (CVD). Mean (±SD) age was 50.3±17.0 years. Total T was
moderately correlated with DHT (r=0.56), E2 (r=0.35) and sex hormone-binding
globulin (r=0.53). In age, smoking, body mass index (BMI) and sex hormone-binding
globulin (SHBG)-adjusted analyses, T was inversely associated with metabolic
syndrome score, while DHT and E2 were not associated. In multivariable models,
higher total T was associated with lower age, BMI and C-reactive protein, and
with higher creatinine and haemoglobin, independently of SHBG. Higher DHT was
associated with lower age, BMI and glucose level, and higher creatinine and
haemoglobin. E2 was positively associated with age, BMI and haemoglobin.
CONCLUSIONS: In men spanning younger, middle and older ages, circulating
androgens are more related to age and metabolic factors than CVD or chronic
disease. Further investigation is required to clarify whether androgens and
estrogens have contrasting roles as risk predictors for CVD. This article is
protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

JAMA Dermatol. 2013 May;149(5):601-6.
Association of androgenetic alopecia with mortality from diabetes mellitus and
heart disease.
Su LH(1), Chen LS, Lin SC, Chen HH.
(1)Department of Dermatology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
IMPORTANCE: Identifying predictors of mortality from diabetes mellitus (DM) and
heart disease can help shape treatment strategies. Presence of androgenetic
alopecia (AGA) might be such a predictor.
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the presence of AGA is associated with an
elevated rate of mortality from DM and heart disease in both sexes after
adjustment for potential confounders.
DESIGN: A population-based prospective cohort study.
SETTING: Community-based integrated screening in Taiwan.
PARTICIPANTS: A total of 7252 subjects aged 30 to 95 years participated in the
baseline AGA survey using the Norwood and Ludwig classifications between April
and June 2005. Baseline information on metabolic syndrome (MetS) and other
possible risk factors was also collected. We then followed this cohort over time
to ascertain death and cause of death until December 2010. INTERVENTIONS OR
EXPOSURES: Application of Norwood and Ludwig ALA classifications to study
population.
MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Deaths from DM and heart disease.
RESULTS: Among the 7126 subjects (2429 men and 4697 women) who provided complete
data, there were 70 deaths from DM and heart disease during the 57-month
follow-up period. Subjects with moderate to severe AGA vs normal or mild AGA had
a significantly higher risk of mortality from DM (adjusted hazard ratio
,
2.97; 95% CI, 1.26-7.01) (P = .01) and heart disease (adjusted HR, 2.28; 95% CI,
1.00-5.23) (P = .05) after adjusting for age, family history of DM or heart
disease, and MetS.
CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: AGA is an independent predictor of mortality from DM and heart disease in both sexes. This finding may have significant implications
for the identification of risk factors for DM and heart disease in patients with
moderate or severe AGA, regardless of whether MetS is present.

Am J Phys Anthropol. 1992 May;88(1):59-67.
Relations between sex hormone level and characters of hair and skin in healthy
young men.
Knussmann R(1), Christiansen K, Kannmacher J.
(1)Institut für Humanbiologie, University of Hamburg, Germany.
Total testosterone and dihydrotestosterone in blood serum as well as free
testosterone in saliva were determined by radioimmunoassay in 110 healthy young
men. The results were compared with the development of terminal hair on the trunk
and limbs, with the disposition to balding and with the disposition to acne. No
significant correlations were found between terminal hair development and
absolute androgen levels; however, some significant values were observed in the
case of the metabolic rate of dihydrotestosterone/testosterone and the proportion
of free to total testosterone. The disposition to balding also correlates
positively with the latter ratio. Yet the absolute serum androgen concentrations
in men with a disposition to balding is lower than in men with no reduction of
scalp hair. The widespread assumption that androgen levels are in general
elevated in bald-trait men must therefore be rejected. In accordance with this
finding, men with a disposition to balding are morphologically (with regard to
anthropometric measures) no more masculine than those with good scalp hair
growth. When body build and age are taken into consideration, the relations
between terminal hair and androgen ratio are also problematical. No relationship
could be found between acne and androgens.

J Androl. 2010 Mar-Apr;31(2):155-62.
Estradiol and metabolic syndrome in older italian men: The InCHIANTI Study.
Maggio M(1), Lauretani F, Ceda GP, Bandinelli S, Basaria S, Paolisso G, Giumelli
C, Luci M, Najjar SS, Metter EJ, Valenti G, Guralnik J, Ferrucci L.
(1)Department of Internal Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Section of Geriatrics,
University of Parma, 43100 Parma, Italy. marcellomaggio2001@yahoo.it
The increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) with age in older men has
been linked with decreasing testosterone levels. Interestingly, while
testosterone levels decline with age, estradiol (E2) levels remain relatively
stable, resulting in a decreased testosterone:E2 ratio. Because E2 levels tend to
be elevated in morbid obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes, it is reasonable
to hypothesize that high E2 levels are associated with MS in older men. We
studied the relationship of total and free E2 with MS after adjustment for
multiple confounders, including age, BMI, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical
activity, interleukin-6 (IL-6), fasting insulin, and testosterone. Men 65 years
or older (age range, 65-96; n = 452) had complete data on E2, testosterone,
fasting insulin, sex hormone-binding globulin, IL-6, and albumin. Concentrations
of free E2 and free testosterone were calculated using the mass action equations.
MS was defined according to Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP-III). Participants
with MS had significantly higher serum free and total E2 (P < .001) (P = .003).
After adjusting for confounders, including age, smoking, alcohol consumption,
physical activity, log(IL-6), and log(insulin), participants with higher
log(total E2) (odds ratio [OR], 2.31; 95% confidence interval [95% CI],
1.39-4.70; P = .02) and higher log(free E2) (OR, 2.69; 1.38-5.24; P < .001) had
an increased risk of having MS. Log(free E2) (P = .04) maintained significant
correlation with MS, even after further adjustment for BMI. In older men, high E2
is independently associated with MS. Whether confirmed in other studies,
assessment of E2 should be also considered in older men. Whether changes in this
hormonal pattern play a role in the development of MS should be further tested in
longitudinal studies.

Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 2007 Jun;14(3):226-34.
Androgen deficiency, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome in men.
Kalyani RR(1), Dobs AS.
(1)Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine,
Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA.
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The burden of androgen deficiency in men with diabetes and the
metabolic syndrome has become increasingly apparent in population-based studies.
This article focuses on the mechanisms underlying the interdependent relationship
between these conditions.
RECENT FINDINGS: Various definitions of hypogonadism, the metabolic syndrome and
diabetes have been proposed and are used in the literature. Cross-sectional
studies have found that between 20 and 64% of men with diabetes have
hypogonadism, with higher prevalence rates found in the elderly. Hypogonadism can
be a risk factor for the development of diabetes and the metabolic syndrome
through various mechanisms including changes in body composition; androgen
receptor polymorphisms; glucose transport; and reduced antioxidant effect.
Conversely, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome can be risk factors for
hypogonadism through some similar but mostly distinct mechanisms, such as
increased body weight; decreased sex hormone binding globulin levels; suppression
of gonadotrophin release or Leydig cell testosterone production;
cytokine-mediated inhibition of testicular steroid production; and increased
aromatase activity contributing to relative estrogen excess.
SUMMARY: The relationship between diabetes, the metabolic syndrome and androgen
deficiency is complex. Testosterone supplementation, by either oral or
intramuscular routes and through exogenous or endogenous delivery, has a
promising role in this population although further clinical trials are needed.



BMI appears to come with higher severity of alopecia. I don't see the relevance of many of these studies, however. One of them shows that androgen concentrations weren't higher in balding men, three are on dogs.
 
Last edited:

Lokzo

Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2016
Messages
1,690
Location
Melbourne
Aromatase, Endotoxins, Cortisol and the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 promote Estrogen synthesis. Zinc has inhibiting effects on all of them. Zinc also antagonizes Copper (preventing excess) and Copper is estrogenic. It also competes with Cadmium, prevents testicular damage from Lead and Aluminium, and these 3 metals are classified as metalloestrogens with known estrogenic effects. Zinc is low in prostate cancer which Estrogen promotes, and bald men have significantly higher risks of aggressive prostate cancer.
Outstanding knowledge. Thanks.
 

Hairfedup

Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2017
Messages
383
The recommended form advice is weird to begin with, since forms other than Picolinate have been shown to be completely ineffective at affecting Zinc levels.

Comparative absorption of zinc picolinate, zinc citrate and zinc gluconate in humans. - PubMed - NCBI
Effect of iron, vitamin B-6 and picolinic acid on zinc absorption in the rat. - PubMed - NCBI
It also requires more than 50mg of Picolinate to have an effect on serum levels, although this is trumped by average diets that include phytic acid and gut irritants that cause intestinal permeability, reducing absorption of minerals. Zinc itself shows efficacy in restoring intestinal barrier integrity, and deficiency causes intestinal permeability.

Perhaps one should take it several hours away from meals to avoid the oxidation he mentions (can't find it happening in studies though), but 10mg is definitely not enough when it comes to protection against hair loss and regrowth. Personally I have almost always taken it away from meals with a sip of Apple Cider Vinegar, usually when I woke up and did IF; mainly because the isolated effect seemed more potent than with meals. It acted like a nootropic to go to class/work when I had more social anxiety, completely eliminated stress.

Hey man, as part of your protocol then, I have to take 50mg of Zinc Picolinate instead of the standard 25?
 

Elephanto

Member
Joined
May 21, 2015
Messages
820
Hey man, as part of your protocol then, I have to take 50mg of Zinc Picolinate instead of the standard 25?
Up to 100mg. Absorbtion rate decreases as dose increases, and decreased minerals absorption from intestinal permeability is often present in mpb. 100mg can be fine for the first weeks to resplenish. P-5-P (50mg) will also help increase absorption.
 

Hairfedup

Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2017
Messages
383
Up to 100mg. Absorbtion rate decreases as dose increases, and decreased minerals absorption from intestinal permeability is often present in mpb. 100mg can be fine for the first weeks to resplenish. P-5-P (50mg) will also help increase absorption.

OK thats great, thanks for responding. In order not to lose my hair post cyclo (A study said hair loss occurs again after 4 weeks) I'm going all out on your protocol. The Hong Kong study head massage too.
 
Similar threads
Thread starter Title Forum Replies Date
charlie EXCLUSIVE: Evidence Shows Director General Of WHO Overstated The Fatality Rate Of The Coronavirus Breaking News 123
nigma Human Bodies Have Steadily Grown Colder Over The Past Century, Evidence Shows Scientific Studies 46
Arclight Anti-Peat Where is there good evidence that challenges the Central Dogma (and the safety of injecting foreign RNA)? Debate - Anti-Peat 4
Nehring In Vivo Evidence For The Anticancer Effect Of Thiamine / Thoughts On TTFD B1 16
M Personal Anecdotal Evidence Re: Coffee Consumption And Height Miscellaneous Health Discussions 45
L Covid-19, The Coverup, The Cure & Key Evidence Articles & Scientific Studies 0
S Evidence For Estrogen Levels In Mpb Hair & Nails 48
S Evidence For Estrogen Levels In Mpb Hair & Nails 38
F UK Telegraph: Lack Of Evidence Lockdowns Actually Worked Is World Scandal Viruses, Parasites, Fungus, Vaccines 7
E New Evidence That Higher Caffeine And Urate Levels Are Protective Against Parkinson's Disease Scientific Studies 2
Mito New Evidence That Higher Caffeine And Urate Levels Are Protective Against Parkinson’s Articles & Scientific Studies 0
S Covid-19: Evidence Over Hysteria Scientific Studies 24
ecstatichamster Dr. Peat Right Again: Losartan And Covid-19 Evidence For Efficacy Scientific Studies 63
Mito First Evidence Of Immune Response Targeting Brain Cells In Autism Articles & Scientific Studies 3
E Scientific Evidence Non-ionizing Radiation From Mobile Phones Has Mental And Biological Effects Society 0
L Wherein Experts Rationalize Evidence That Contradicts What They 'Know' Scientific Studies 1
Lizb Liver Health, Hot Flushes. No Evidence For Remedy Here Female Issues 32
H Scientists Find First Evidence Of Humans Cooking Starches Articles & Scientific Studies 8
Mito Direct Evidence For Transport Of RNA From The Mouse Brain To The Germline And Offspring Articles & Scientific Studies 0
haidut There Is No "Depression Gene", Any "evidence" So Far Has Been Errors / Fraud Scientific Studies 1
L New Evidence Of Synergism Between Vitamins A And D — Can They Cure Diabetes? Fat-Soluble Vitamins 2
C Increased Excretion Of C4-Carnitine Species After A Therapeutic Acetylsalicylic Acid Dose: Evidence Aspirin 0
haidut DNA Evidence Can Be Completely Fabricated Society 0
Makrosky Porphyromonas Gingivalis In Alzheimer’s Disease Brains: Evidence For Disease Causation And Treatment Alzheimer's 2
Lokzo Current Evidence For The Involvement Of Sex Steroid Receptors And Sex Hormones In BPH Scientific Studies 0
haidut The Evidence Is Now CLEAR That Cell Phone Radiation (EMF) Causes Cancer Scientific Studies 167
Mito Evidence For Apo B Lipoproteins As The Root Cause Of Atherosclerosis Articles & Scientific Studies 1
P Evidence For Brain Sensing Of Circulating FFA Articles & Scientific Studies 0
Dan Wich KMUD: 9-21-2018 Evidence Based Medicine KMUD Radio-The Herb Doctors 8
Lokzo Evidence For Androgenic Activity Of Tumeric And Curcumin Scientific Studies 2
Mito Dietary Fat And Cardiometabolic Health: Evidence, Controversies, And Consensus For Guidance Articles & Scientific Studies 1
ddjd Anecdotal Evidence MSM Regrows Hair - Nitric Oxide Antagonist! Ask For Help or Advice 18
H Brain Scan Study Adds To Evidence That Lower Brain Serotonin Levels Are Linked To Dementia Scientific Studies 5
A More Evidence Essential Oils 'make Male Breasts Develop' Ray Peat Topics 10
D Evidence That Progesterone Raises Glutamate? Supplements, Pharmaceutical Drugs 1
AretnaP Did Gbolduev Have Any Evidence To Back Up His Claims About PH? Acidity vs. Alkalinity 216
dand "When Evidence Says No, But Doctors Say Yes Scientific Studies 2
ecstatichamster Evidence That Cortisol Really Does Cause Hair Loss Hair & Nails 337
ecstatichamster Evidence Of Traditional Long-fermentation Bread Being Healthier Vegetables, Grains, Legumes, Fiber 2
Mr. God of Cars Where Is The Evidence That Saturated Fats ___ Pyruvate Dehydrogenase? Metabolism 4
Mr. God of Cars What Is The Ray Peat's Evidence For Iron Being Necessary For Continued Growth? Diet 4
Soren More Evidence Parkinson's Starts In The Gut Digestion, Gut Flora 1
P Evidence For A GABAergic System In Rodent And Human Testis: Local GABA Production And GABA Receptors Articles & Scientific Studies 3
ecstatichamster Studies? Where Is Evidence PUFAs Are Preferentially Stored Not Burned? Science 25
haidut Solid Evidence That Stress Causes Obesity Scientific Studies 16
P Evidence For The Involvement Of 5-HT1A Receptor In The Acute Antidepressant-like Effect Of Creatine Articles & Scientific Studies 10
michael94 Carrageenan Evidence? Miscellaneous Health Discussions 11
burtlancast Looking For Scientific Evidence Of Steel Buildings Pancaking At Free Fall Speed. Anyone? Political Talk, Alternative World Theories 25
Daimyo Why evidence base medicine is a scam? Miscellaneous Health Discussions 1
haidut More Evidence That Anti-depressants May Worsen Mental Health Scientific Studies 24

Similar threads

Top