What about....MUFAS?

pboy

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So from what I gather, moderate amounts of saturated fats spaced out are beneficial to metabolism and protect during and facilitate PUFA detoxification.
PUFA's are unavoidable, but attempting to limit as much as possible is beneficial because they are prone to oxidate uncontrollably and therefore a stress to the body,
and if not able to be immediately detoxed will be stored and have to be detoxed whenever the opportunity arises (though with consequences)

What about MUFA's though?

Should they be avoided as much as possible?
Are they beneficial?
Are they neutral?

I'm still attempting to accumulate as much knowledge from the Ray Peat sphere as possible...still kinda new to it. If I had to guess, I'd say MUFA's are relatively neutral in
moderation but maybe detrimental in excess?
What's the general verdict?
 

key

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quick scan of RP site for monounsaturated; 99% good :D :

Queen bees, which live many times longer than worker bees, have mainly monounsaturated fats in their tissues, while the tissues of the short-lived worker bees, receiving a different diet, within a couple of weeks of hatching will contain highly unsaturated fats.

Other PUFAs, including linoleic acid, linolenic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid, were also effective in stimulating NBF formation in astrocytes, whereas saturated palmitic acid and monounsaturated oleic acid were ineffective.

The fetus produces saturated fats such as palmitic acid, and the monounsaturated fat, oleic acid, which can be turned into the Mead acid, ETrA (5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid), and its derivatives, which are antiinflammatory, and some of which act on the "bliss receptor," or the cannibinoid receptor. In the adult, tissues such as cartilage, which are protected by their structure or composition from the entry of exogenous fats, contain the Mead acid despite the presence of linoleic acid in the blood.

Experiments in mammary glands cancer showed that a 15% olive-oil diet reduced significantly the tumor incidence caused by 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene. The antitumor effect of the olive-oil diet was connected to its content of monounsaturated fatty acids, such as oleic and palmitic acids. The promotive tumorigenic effects of other high-fat diets (avocado, soybeans) were associated with high content of some polyunsaturated fatty acids (linoleic and alpha-linolenic).

Diabetes induced a decrease of monounsaturated fatty acids and particularly palmitoleic acid in all studied tissues: liver, aorta, plasma." C18:3 n-6 and C20:4 n-6 were increased by diabetes.

In menopausal women, polyunsaturated fatty acids and even monounsaturated fats are associated with bone loss, fruit and vegetable consumption protects against bone loss (Macdonald, et al., 2004).
 

Asimov

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I agree with 99% good. If you look at rat studies comparing SFA vs MUFA they health indicators and life expectancy are nearly identical. The same can be said of specific SFA heavy fats vs MUFA heavy fats (IE: butter v olive oil).

They're pretty close.
 

gretchen

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Asimov said:
I agree with 99% good. If you look at rat studies comparing SFA vs MUFA they health indicators and life expectancy are nearly identical. The same can be said of specific SFA heavy fats vs MUFA heavy fats (IE: butter v olive oil).

They're pretty close.

I thought olive oil needs to be limited to a teaspoon a day or less due to being 10% PUFA. I used a lot of olive oil in the 2000s with steadily worsening results; it's very long chain is according to WAP leaders Fallon and Enig is mostly stored as body fat.
 

Asimov

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gretchen said:
Asimov said:
I agree with 99% good. If you look at rat studies comparing SFA vs MUFA they health indicators and life expectancy are nearly identical. The same can be said of specific SFA heavy fats vs MUFA heavy fats (IE: butter v olive oil).

They're pretty close.

I thought olive oil needs to be limited to a teaspoon a day or less due to being 10% PUFA. I used a lot of olive oil in the 2000s with steadily worsening results; it's very long chain is according to WAP leaders Fallon and Enig is mostly stored as body fat.
Most fish oils contain long chain fatty acids too, but that doesn't stop WAP from recommending them. Besides, the mitochondria can metabolize any length of fatty acid up to and including long chain fatty acids without problem. Even for super long chains of fats, peroximes will break down the lipid, allowing them to be metabolized normally. I see WAP's argument as a little off target in accordance with the reality of fatty acid metabolism.

I know Peat advises against consumption of olive oil, and it's probably a prudent idea, but in reality olive oil isn't just oleic acid. It's essentially a whole food, just being what fat can be squeezed naturally out of an olive. It contains massive amounts of vitamin E to protect against it's own oxidation, and vitamin K to promote metabolic upregulation.

As I said, in reality most well conducted studies that compare olive oil to butter (that I've seen) came out pretty much dead even in health indicators. I know they're drastically different fats, and butter is on paper miles better, in vivo it doesn't appear to be a huge difference.

In my n=1 I've seen great results from olive oil consumption, drastically different results that I've seen from say canola or corn oil consumption. IMHO, having a little olive oil on your salad (yes, even more than a teaspoon) is probably OK. For the record however, olive oil is the LEAST saturated fat I knowingly consume on a regular basis.
 

BingDing

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What about MUFAs?

[moderator edit: topics merged]

So we know Polyunsaturated Fats can get oxidized, i.e. turn rancid. But what about Monounsaturated Fats? Are they better than PUFAs? Worse than SFAs?

I can cite two contradictory sources, and I'm not smart enough to master the material myself.

Any thoughts? Explanations? Rock solid, no BS, this is how it is stuff?
 

Mittir

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Re: What about MUFAs?

It all depends on number of double bonds, more double bonds mean more rancidity.
SFA has no double bond
MUFA has one double bond
PUFA has multiple double bonds.
Fish oil has most double bonds. DHA 6 EPA 5
Arachidonic acid 4
Vegetable oil : alpha Linolenic 3 and Linoleic 2
 

FredSonoma

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What are MUFA not unhealthy?

[moderator edit: topics merged]

Title says all... just confused why MUFA isn't as bad as PUFA.

Edit: Should be "WHY are MUFA not unhealthy?" sorry lol
 

Mittir

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Re: What are MUFA not unhealthy?

MUFA has one double bond and PUFA has multiple double bonds. Vegetable Omega 6 linoleic has 2
and fish oil has 5-6. The extent of damage depends on number of double bonds.
Omega 3 and 6 are involved in prostaglandin production, inflammatory and anti-inflammatory.
Linoleic acid can be converted to Arachidonic acid inside the body, can make inflammatory
prostaglandins. MUFA is little safer in that sense. Our body also makes MUFA from saturated fat.
This would imply it fits the internal system. PUFA tends to interrupt some internal systems by
being in places it should not be.
 
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Re: What are MUFA not unhealthy?

The only natural sources of MUFA are olive, avocado, and macadamia nut. There are much smaller amounts in other nuts/seeds and a little in some animal fat. The only other large source are free oils. Olive, avocado, and nuts are not something that you should be gorging on in the first place, so MUFA should not be of concern.
 
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