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Vitamin E Is An Estrogen Receptor Antagonist

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Nov 12, 2015.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    There have been a few studies in the last 5 years discussing the use of mixed tocopherol supplement to greatly reduce breast cancer growth. The studies showed that the human equivalent of about 2,500mg high-gamma tocopherol mixture inhibited breast cancer tumor growth by about 80%. All of these studies linked to an older study and said that vitamin E is known to interact with the estrogen receptor. So, I got that study and it looks like alpha tocopherol is an estrogen receptor antagonist much like the drug fulvestrant (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulvestrant). The study actually compared the effectiveness of vitamin E (alpha tocopherol) to tamoxifen and found that 100μM of vitamin E to be as effective as 10μM tamoxifen, with that concentration of tamoxifen considered pharmacological levels. So, in addition to being aromatase inhibitor as discussed in a previous post (https://www.raypeatforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3106) vitamin E (alpha tocopherol) is also an estrogen receptor antagonist. Perhaps more importantly, once the alpha tocopherol had interacted with the estrogen receptor and blocked it, even additions of even very high doses of exogenous estrogen could NOT restore breast cancer cell growth.
    Finally, doses needed to achieve that concentration were not that high. The study says that oral doses of 100 IU - 200 IU alpha tocopherol achieve concentration of 30μM, so worst case scenario you are looking at about 600 IU daily alpha-tocopherol to replicate the findings of this study.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16091003

    "...The results of this study suggest that one of the pathways in which vitamin E inhibits breast cancer cell growth is by altering the response of cells to estrogen. This deduction is based on the following observations: 1) vitamin E inhibits ER-positive cells to a greater extent than ER-negative cells, 2) vitamin E decreases the response of ER-positive cells to different concentrations of estrogen, 3) vitamin E does not induce cell growth inhibition when estrogen is absent in the medium, 4) vitamin E decreases cell growth inhibition induced by Tam, and 5) vitamin E decreases the response to immunostaining of the ER."

    "...To determine whether the inhibitory effect of vitamin E was due to the direct interaction of vitamin E with estrogen, we used high concentrations of estrogen (25–100μM) to overcome the effect of vitamin E on the growth of MCF-7 cells. As shown in Fig. 5, addition of estrogen up to 100 nM did not restore the growth inhibition induced by 100μM vitamin E (Fig. 5)."

    "...In conclusion, our study is one of the first to report the effect of vitamin E on estrogen response of breast cancer cells. It provides evidence that vitamin E (α-tocopherol) may be a new nonsteroidal environmental anti-estrogen, and a dietary supplementation of vitamin E may be a preventive measure for breast cancer. Further studies are needed to investigate the precise mechanism of growth inhibition induced by α-tocopherol in ER-positive breast cancer cells."

    "...The plasma vitamin E level in healthy people is about 30μM; such a level can be reached by most persons with an intake of about 100–200 IU per day (14). In human studies with double-blind protocols and in large population studies, oral vitamin E supplementation resulted in few side effects even at doses as high as 3,200 mg/day (3,200 IU/day) (15)."
     
  2. jb116

    jb116 Member

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    PubMed is getting confusing. On one hand they have these types of publications and on the other they are stating pufas reduce heeart disease :roll:
     
  3. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    That same study says that eating PUFA without sufficient concurrent intake of vitamin E causes breast cancer. So, there is some consistency...inside the actual studies, away from the abstract and away from prying eyes that can cause funding withdrawal by reporting it to the FDA:):

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6817942

    "...Results of this experiment indicated that vitamin E excess failed to overcome the augmented tumor yield in selenium-deficient rats, nor did it provide any protection in rats that received an adequate supply of selenium. In summary, vitamin E deficiency may increase the risk of neoplastic development, especially when coupled with a high polyunsaturated fat intake; however, a high vitamin E supplementation does not seem to have any prophylactic effect on tumorigenesis by itself."
     
  4. jb116

    jb116 Member

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    I'm trying to find that exact post, it's like it disappeared on me. They do have plenty of consistent findings but also contradictory ones. I just dont want to find myself cherry picking to align with certain notions going in. I do remember it stating analysis of cohort studies. I suppose all sources in that case have to be accounted for before settling on that particular conclusion.
     
  5. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I am with you on that one. If someone actually spent the time to do a meta-analysis on all studies exploring connection b/n PUFA and cancer, the scales will not be tilted so heavily on FDA's side. Most of the studies I have seen are at least cautious about PUFA intake, which is markedly different from what official guidlines are, and those official guidelines are supposedly based on the studies from PubMed.
     
  6. Giraffe

    Giraffe Member

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    Do you mean this post 109096 post?
     
  7. jb116

    jb116 Member

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    yea I believe that is the one. And a good point was brought up in questioning what the saturated source was and the overall life styles of those consuming the given sfa.
     
  8. superhuman

    superhuman Member

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  9. dookie

    dookie Member

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    Is anyone aware of a supplement with only Gamma Tocopherol? The ones I found, even when marketed as "Gamma E", seem to have some alpha tocopherol added too.
     
  10. Wilfrid

    Wilfrid Member

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  11. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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  12. jb116

    jb116 Member

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    It's the only one I use now
     
  13. Mateo Wiechers

    Mateo Wiechers Member

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    Hi, if you where to take a high dose of Vitamin E, say 1500 mg, for Estrogen Reduction, would it be better to split te dose across the Day?
     
  14. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I don't think that such a high dose is needed. Several recent studies found that a dose of around 500mg daily optimally suppresses estrogen and at that dose it can be taken in a single sitting with a large meal to reduce risk of GI irritation.
     
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