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Vitamin D - The New Antibiotic Against Skin And Gut Infections

haidut

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A great new study demonstrating the crucial role of vitamin D in maintaining proper immune function. The study demonstrates that maintaining normal levels of vitamin D is strongly protective against gut infections by Salmonella-type bacteria. Interestingly, the authors claim that vitamin D is likely to provide protection against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) conditions such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), yet they call these conditions "non-pathogenic". Well, at this point it is well-established that CD has a very high-likelihood of being caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium paratuberculosis. In fact, studies have raised questions whether specific/exclusive diagnosis of either CD or tuberculosis are not in fact the same disease, thus calling for the treatment of CD as an infectious rather than as an "autoimmune" condition. If it does turn out that CD is in fact a pathogen-driven disease then this would likely turn into yet another incredibly embarrassing and litigious quagmire in the medical community since the current therapy for CD is mainly immunosuppression and this is the worst possible "therapy" for a patient who may in fact turn out to be suffering from a chronic bacterial infection. Oh, and it just so happens that high-dose vitamin D protocols for treating IBD and other "autoimmune" conditions already exists, which further corroborates both the findings of this study and the hypothesis that a pathogen (or its endotoxin) is involved in likely all "autoimmune" conditions.

Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis - Wikipedia
Distinguishing Tuberculosis and Crohn's Disease in Developing Countries: How Certain Can You Be of the Diagnosis?

Moving on, the study also demonstrated that once-daily, topical application of vitamin D3 (dissolved in an ethanol-based carrier) for two days in a row resulted in strikingly improved healing of skin wounds infected by staph-type bacteria. In fact, the skin infection could be treated entirely with vitamin D3, without using an antibiotic as add-on. The HED of vitamin D3 was 60 IU / kg of bodyweight daily. I suspect that adding vitamin E and A to the D3 would make even more effective as both vitamins have already established pro-immune and anti-bacterial effects. Assuming the usual 3:1 - 5:1 optimal ratio rule for A:D still applies, that means 180 - 300 IU vitamin A / kg of bodyweight would be needed. Vitamin E would likely work in any dose, but the studies utilizing for topical wound protection most often cite a daily dose of 100 IU - 200 IU.

Unfortunately, they did not test internal vitamin D3 administration as a treatment of Salmonella gut infection but that is proposed to be tried soon in a subsequent study. What this study did show, is that the higher the expression of the CAMP protein, the more resistant the organism is to a gut infection. Considering CAMP is dependent on vitamin D levels, I think the likelihood of vitamin D administration also treating gut infections is high.

A mouse model for vitamin D-induced human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene expression - ScienceDirect
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-12-vitamin-d-infection.html

"...Oregon State University researchers have led the development of a new model for studying vitamin D's role in infection prevention, and tests using the model suggest that vitamin D treatment can dramatically reduce the number of disease-causing bacteria in skin wounds."

"...The current study examines the bioactive form of vitamin D's role in promoting the body's production of the cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, typically abbreviated to CAMP. A peptide is a compound consisting of two or more amino acids linked in a chain, and CAMP is made by immune cells and cells that provide a barrier against infection, such as skin and gut cells."

"...To study how vitamin D and CAMP work together to help thwart infection, Gombart and his research team developed a line of mice that carry the CAMP gene but not Camp. They bred mice engineered to carry human CAMP to mice with their Camp gene knocked out, resulting in mice with an antimicrobial peptide gene regulated by the bioactive form of vitamin D. The scientists believe the novel model will be useful as research into vitamin D-induced expression of CAMP progresses, involving diseases caused by microorganisms and also conditions that are "non-pathogenic," such as inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, researchers showed that the mice with the human CAMP gene had increased resistance to gut infections, and that staph infections on their skin could be successfully treated with the bioactive form of the vitamin."
 

LLight

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I have to admit that I'm a bit confused by the vitamin D story:
  1. From one study, it's known that the active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH) vitamin D3, is already high in people with "autoimmune"/inflammatory diseases, so what's the point of supplementing the precursor of this hormone (maybe higher levels of the active form are needed) if it's already high. I wonder if doesn't simply indicate a vitamin D pathway dysregulation. By the way, the vitamin D used topically in the study is the active form 1,25(OH).
  2. I read somewhere that some people who supplements with vitamin D are resistant to that, i.e. their levels stay low. It seems like the level is regulated by the body.
  3. I'm not sure that to study without testing the effect of supplementing vitamin D is really helpful. Saying that a group of people is low in vitamin D and seem to have in common a disease does not directly imply that they should supplement. I agree when you say that we should wait to see the results of studies about supplementation.
 
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rob

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@LLight yeah, interesting the vitamin D and autoimmunity argument.

I have Crohn’s limited to my colon and years back D3 was one of the first things I tested. Even though my calprotectin was through the roof and it was Winter my 25(OH)D test - like many tests subsequently that I’d expected to come back abnormal -showed ‘normal’ levels (106nmol/L). I did try supplementation regardless but I never saw benefits to my disease.

Also, one of the last studies I read on the use of high-dose d3 treatment on CD sufferers showed no difference on level of relapse vis-a-vis the control group.
 

LLight

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Also, one of the last studies I read on the use of high-dose d3 treatment on CD sufferers showed no difference on level of relapse vis-a-vis the control group.
So, who we should believe: the studies showing no benefit regarding vitamin D supplements or the Coimbra protocol people?
 

lampofred

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RP says a low ratio of calcium to phosphate intake, hyperventilation, bad gut bacteria, or insufficient protein intake, by causing high PTH, will increase conversion of vitamin D to the activated form.
 

rob

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So, who we should believe: the studies showing no benefit regarding vitamin D supplements or the Coimbra protocol people?

Honestly, I don’t know.

There are studies both sides of the argument can cite. I can’t discount that a subset of patients might have low d3 and that supplementation might benefit them - there’s certainly an appealing biochemical rationale, at least on one level. Though, obviously there are sufferers like me where this doesn’t apply, so we just have to be cautious in overly generalising our comments on this subject given existing evidence.

RP says a low ratio of calcium to phosphate intake, hyperventilation, bad gut bacteria, or insufficient protein intake, by causing high PTH, will increase conversion of vitamin D to the activated form.

Good points. That said, my PTH levels are always normal and my protein intake is good. Guess just blame it on the bacteria :)
 

LeeLemonoil

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some related newsih publications on Vit Ds beneficial effects on Acne, other inflammatory skin diseases and its effects on the cornea as well as alleric rhinitis - all of which are related atopic pathologie
I recently seeked these out, may as well post them here:

Propionibacterium acnes Induces an IL-17 Response in Acne Vulgaris that Is Regulated by Vitamin A and Vitamin D. - PubMed - NCBI

Vitamin D and the Pathophysiology of Inflammatory Skin Diseases. - PubMed - NCBI

https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/485132

Vitamin D and the Skin: An Update for Dermatologists. - PubMed - NCBI
Maintaining a vitamin D serum concentration within normal levels is warranted in atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, vitiligo, polymorphous light eruption, mycosis fungoides, alopecia areata, systemic lupus erythematosus, and melanoma patients.


Serum Level of IL 10 is Significantly Increased in Allergic Rhinitis Patients on Subcutaneous Immunotherapy and Vitamin D Supplementation. - PubMed - NCBI

Calcitriol inhibits ROS-NLRP3-IL-1β signaling axis via activation of Nrf2-antioxidant signaling in hyperosmotic stress stimulated human corneal epi... - PubMed - NCBI

Effects of 1,25 and 24,25 Vitamin D on Corneal Epithelial Proliferation, Migration and Vitamin D Metabolizing and Catabolizing Enzymes. - PubMed - NCBI

Calcitriol, the Active Metabolite of Vitamin D3, Inhibits Dry Eye Related Corneal Inflammation In Vivo and In Vitro. - PubMed - NCBI


Modulatory effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on eye disorders: A critical review. - PubMed - NCBI
 

LLight

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25-vitamin D reduces inflammation in uremic environment

"Giffoni et al. demonstrated that lymphocytes obtained from uremic patients supplemented with 25-vitamin D exhibited an increase of VDR and CYP27 expression, resulting in reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Contrary to expectations, we did not observe an increased intracellular expression of VDR and CYP27 when the monocytes were treated with 25-vitamin D. It supposed that the effect of 25-vitamin D might be dependent on the cell type and exposure time to regulate inflammatory mechanisms."
 

Peatogenic

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Interesting, I was just wondering today if it's best to approach "autoimmunity" from an antibiotic realm or from an immunity realm. Its nice seeing that someone could use Vitamin D as an antibiotic. Or that fighting off infection really is so dependant on the total energy picture.
 

GAF

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I am pretty sure that A &D Ointment was very popular in the 50's when I was a tiny baby. It's still in every pharmacy, etc.
 

kyle

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@haidut
Have you come across research showing how long it takes to correct D levels via supplementation or sun? Or how long it takes to deplete it?
 

Peatogenic

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here's another study confirming antifungal activity, but not sure the form:

Vitamin D3 a new drug against Candida albicans - ScienceDirect

This study seems to show antiviral activity in the 1,25 form:

Vitamin D inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages through the induction of autophagy. - PubMed - NCBI

"In conclusion, 25(OH)D(3) suppresses PTH synthesis by parathyroid cells, possibly by direct activation of the VDR.":
25-Hydroxyvitamin D(3) suppresses PTH synthesis and secretion by bovine parathyroid cells. - PubMed - NCBI

"Together, we surmise that the ability of 25D3 to stimulate VDR target genes may provide a novel perspective for its role in certain tissues."
25(OH)D3 stimulates the expression of vitamin D target genes in renal tubular cells when Cyp27b1 is abrogated. - PubMed - NCBI
 
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Angel45

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Nov 2, 2019
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Weird, I noticed that after supplementing w vit d for a while I am able to tolerate eggs again. For some reason eggs were giving me food poisoning symptoms, even though I was buying them for a clean local farm. Vit d must be killing off salmonella or something
 
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Unfortunately, they did not test internal vitamin D3 administration as a treatment of Salmonella gut infection but that is proposed to be tried soon in a subsequent study.
Hey @haidut do you maybe know if they did the study for oral/internal administration of VIT D?

Thank you.
 

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