Using Peat For An Essay

Discussion in 'Health' started by CentralCoastIan, Dec 5, 2013.

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  1. CentralCoastIan

    CentralCoastIan Member

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    Hello everybody, I've been reading both Peat's, Danny Roddy's, and Matt Stone's works for about 9 months now. Although I've covered a lot of information, I would like some articles to help prove the thesis in my essay that sugar helps stimulate a healthy metabolism and stimulates life, through downregulation of adrenaline/stress hormones, increase in mitochondrial activity, supports t4 to t3 conversion, liver detoxification, etc. If anybody could bring some more points to light about sugar supporting a healthy metabolism, that would be great, and also, if anybody has some quotes or information (not just from Peat, but other reputable sources), that would also be greatly appreciated. By the way, I'm not using this as a cop out to not do research XD I just don't want to miss anything important, as there is an ENORMOUS amount of information on this subject.

    Thanks,

    CentralCoastIan
     
  2. OP
    CentralCoastIan

    CentralCoastIan Member

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    By the way, sorry if I put this in the wrong spot :D
     
  3. Valtsu

    Valtsu Member

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    Since seeing this comment, I've been thinking that one possible mechanisms of fructose's harms could be related to causing copper deficiency:

    [offtopic]What puzzles me about Lustig is that he never mentions copper deficiency. Fructose is known to down-regulate the gut copper transporter Ctr1, and the copper people say this is why fructose is bad for you. It's really only bad if you already have copper deficiency. Of course, the copper people also say most of us do have copper deficiency, although the Powers That Be are convinced we don't. The PTB were utterly destroyed by the recent finding that non-alcholic fatty liver disease is linked to copper deficiency, but as yet they don't seem to have noticed.[/offtopic]

    See these studies, for example:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20407430

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17131334

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3157387 "Approximately 20 years ago a diet high in lard and sucrose was described that produced extensive cardiovascular damage in adult mice. Atrial thrombosis, myocardial necrosis and sudden death were frequent. These experiments were repeated as closely as possible; the adverse effects were prevented by a drinking solution containing 10 micrograms copper/ml."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12437150 (liver is high in copper)



    And some other harms might be related to postprandial endotoxemia in high-fructose diets, but I think that sucrose/glucose both decrease this effect and dietary antioxidants (maybe even vitamin C) can prevent the effect. Choline deficiency might also be harmful, because it prevents the removal of fat from liver (see Chris Masterjohn's articles).

    White sugar also doesn't contain nutrients, even when compared to white flour...



    EDIT: According to this paper, ""In humans fructose consumed as 20% of energy has no effect on copper balance and minimal effects on the criteria of copper status."
     
  4. Mittir

    Mittir Member

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    RP has mentioned in "Iron's Danger' about copper

    Excess iron is a major cause of liver disease and there are several articles showing
    improvement in liver disease by blood donation or low iron diet. I believe those studies
    are in old posts on iron and phlebotomy. They should have measured iron and copper
    both in rats and human. It is likely that excess iron intake contributed to low copper in liver
    diseased patients.
     
  5. Mittir

    Mittir Member

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    @CentralCoastIan

    RP has several articles with "sugar" in the title. His articles are full of citations.
    Danny Roddy usually put good amount of source in his writing.
    Since you are looking for a easy way, i can think of "Perfect Health Diet"
    by Paul Jaminet who wrote a good article on sugar and Ray Peat.
    His post has a good collection of studies that shows sugar increasing liver glycogen.
    http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2012/01/is ... eat-sugar/
    Though he does not totally admit that RP is right about recommending
    higher sugar intake but studies he discussed supports RP's recommendation.
    Our forum member cliff has a good article on benefit of sugar
    http://co2factor.blogspot.com/2012/04/f ... escue.html
    You can always google with keywords and find more studies.
     
  6. jaa

    jaa Member

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    A recent study has found that excess calories and not fructose is linked to NAFLD in humans.

    http://www.foodnavigator.com/Science-Nu ... Human-data
     
  7. fyo

    fyo Member

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    My understanding of this topic is that 'fructose' diets, HFCS diets, sucrose diets, sucrose + nutritious food diets, and fruit diets all have different effects. For example, in this study http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18395289 , fructose fed rads develop endotoxemia, and endotoxin causes a great range of disease, but sucrose fed rats do not develop this endotoxemia, and antibiotics can prevent the disease fructose-fed rats experience.
    And in this old study http://jn.nutrition.org/content/3/1/61.full.pdf+html , rats fed 45% sucrose develop normally, whereas modern rats often seem to get sick on that amount. I think the difference is in what they feed the rats. An increased metabolism needs more nutrition, like you said copper could be a missing factor, and the modern rat diet is probably very lacking and harmful. Maybe even a lack of nutrition causes the problems absorbing fructose, who knows.
     
  8. Mittir

    Mittir Member

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    Here is an earlier post on a study RP mentioned showing caloric content of HFCS drinks.
    viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2501&start=10#p34451
    This study is quite useful in differentiating sugar from HFCS.
    In many studies "Scientists" do not differentiate between sugar and HFCS.
    These studies should be rejected because HFCS has 4-5 more calories than pure sugar.
     
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