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Unsaturated Fat Protects Against Saturated Fat Induced Lipotoxicity

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by AlphaCog, Apr 8, 2019.

  1. AlphaCog

    AlphaCog Member

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    Triglyceride accumulation protects against fatty acid-induced lipotoxicity

    Abstract

    Excess lipid accumulation in non-adipose tissues is associated with insulin resistance, pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis and heart failure. Here, we demonstrate in cultured cells that the relative toxicity of two common dietary long chain fatty acids is related to channeling of these lipids to distinct cellular metabolic fates. Oleic acid supplementation leads to triglyceride accumulation and is well tolerated, whereas excess palmitic acid is poorly incorporated into triglyceride and causes apoptosis. Unsaturated fatty acids rescue palmitate-induced apoptosis by channeling palmitate into triglyceride pools and away from pathways leading to apoptosis. Moreover, in the setting of impaired triglyceride synthesis, oleate induces lipotoxicity. Our findings support a model of cellular lipid metabolism in which unsaturated fatty acids serve a protective function against lipotoxicity though promotion of triglyceride accumulation.
     
  2. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    there are a lot of studies about how wonderful PUFA is. There was an era when it was a fad, to do studies showing how wonderful PUFA is and how bad satfat is.

    This was published in 2003, right in the PUFA fad sweet spot.

    It shows stuff such as that PUFA can inhibit apoptosis. Is that true? If it is, is it really a good or a bad thing?

    Apoptosis stops cancer if the cancer cells are apoptotic. Then it's a good thing.

    It does show that PUFA causes triglyceride accumulation. This protects against "lipotoxicity"

    I'm not smart enough to decode it all, nor do I have the time. But this is a typical study that they churned out during that time (and it's all in vitro I believe, which kinda weakens its applicability to in vitro.)
     
  3. Cirion

    Cirion Member

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    I think there is a movement here on these forums to demonize SFA and promote PUFA's. I'll just say it's in a certain prominent controversial thread and not name any names. This is highly unfortunate. What I really think is the problem is pretty much

    - Excess SFA (RP does not say get 30% of calories from coconut oil but some have done this, including myself even)
    - Excess fats period (SFA's are not better than carbs but are better than PUFAs)
    - Intaking raw oils (I am starting to think eating ANY oil raw is not that great, even coconut oil, but from whole foods can be okay)
    - Dairy fat (My opinion though, but based by experiences)

    In regards to the apoptosis question, apoptosis is generally good if it involves killing bad cells like cancer cells, but normally in a healthy body it is autophagy that regulates the turnover of cells as far as I am aware

    Apoptosis of healthy cells is something you do NOT want, but can happen in an inflamed body. For example it has been shown that exposure to high EMF's can cause apoptosis of otherwise healthy red blood cells
     
  4. Kartoffel

    Kartoffel Member

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    Please summarize for us in simple words what they did in that study. Thank you!
     
  5. Kartoffel

    Kartoffel Member

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    I rcently posted a study showing that BSA is contaminated with LPS and lipopeptides, and that this is responsible for the inflammatory response attributed to palmitate and other saturated fatty acids. In your study, they also used BSA to complex with palmitate. Whatever they did exactely in that study (i don't understand half of what they write), the BSA is very likely responsible for what happened.

    From your study: "Where indicated, cell culture media were supplemented with FA (complexed to BSA at a 6.6:1 molar ratio;")​
     
  6. schultz

    schultz Member

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    Suitable Fats, Unsuitable Fats: Issues in Nutrition
    "The effects of unsaturated fats on cells in vitro are often the opposite of their effects in living animals, but editors are allowing authors to claim that their in vitro results justify dietary or therapeutic use of the fats."
     
  7. RWilly

    RWilly Member

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    What if PUFA is harmful to pathogenic microbes too. That could in turn make it beneficial to us.
     
  8. TeaRex14

    TeaRex14 Member

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    Maybe I messed up by only reading the abstract, but it says oleic acid. "Oleic acid supplementation leads to triglyceride accumulation and is well tolerated, whereas excess palmitic acid is poorly incorporated into triglyceride and causes apoptosis" There's many things wrong with this, firstly oleic acid isn't a PUFA, and secondly using isolate plmaitic acid is a great way to tweak the methodology into their favored bias. Consuming real whole saturated fat means you get a generous supply of stearic acid with palmitic acid, and stearic acid can be desaturated into oleic acid. I think this whole study is flawed just by scraping the surface of it. But again, feel free to tell me if I missed something, I only read the abstract.
     
  9. Rafael Lao Wai

    Rafael Lao Wai Member

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    Nice quote!
     
  10. haidut

    haidut Member

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    If that is true it would also suggest that palmitic acid is a lot less fattening than MUFA and PUFA. In order to get stored in fat tissue the fatty acid must first be turned into a triglyceride. The resistance to esterification also means palmitic acid will stay in the blood much longer and this allows it to have multiple beneficial metabolic effects. For example, elevated PUFA in the blood trigger the stress response (ACTH/cortisol) and increases inflammatory biomarkers. Palmitic acid has the opposite effects, so staying in the blood longer in free form allows it to control/oppose the negative effects of PUFA. Finally, apoptosis is usually a good thing as weakened or (pre)cancerous cells are much vulnerable to apoptosis and we do want them to undergo apoptosis. If PUFA is preventing this from happening then this is yet another negative effect we need to be wary of and a reason to avoid PUFA.
     
  11. TeaRex14

    TeaRex14 Member

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    Yeah I didn't even think about that, thanks. I just know it's next to impossible to consume a diet with only palmitic acid. Most saturated fats like butter and coconut oil have several fatty acids in them.
     
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