Tryptophan/Serotonin

Discussion in 'Meet & Greet' started by thejazzws, Jun 20, 2013.

  1. thejazzws

    thejazzws New Member

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    I'll try to be brief. I've been looking for knowledgeable Contrarian/Iconoclast for a while. Dr. Peat's that guy. I've been reading him for over a year now.

    My first question is, has anybody happened upon an article/email called,"The horrific truth about Monsanto"? In it Jeff Smith - of "Genetic Roulette" fame - is interviewing MIT research scientist, Dr. Stephanie Seneff. At one point during her discussion, she talks about the importance of Tryptophan in the elimination of toxins in the gut from the snow-balling of the Monsanto Roundup toxin, Glycosate...And later going on to talk about how Serotonin is an appetite suppressant, that low levels of Serotonin leads to violent behaviour, etc.

    Now, from what I've read of Dr. Peat - granted most critics of Peat partially take him out of context - the contrarian that he is - but, he does say negative things about Tryptophan and Serotonin, i.e., that they're estrogenic/carcinogenic. Can anybody help me to reconcile this contradiction?
     
  2. 4peatssake

    4peatssake Member

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    Why not ask Ray Peat?

    And :welcome2 to the forum thejazzws!
     
  3. Mittir

    Mittir Member

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    He has written several articles explaining his view on serotonin and tryptophan.
    He makes a good argument for his claim. If you read his articles on estrogen you
    will get a very good idea how wrong medical community was in promoting estrogen.

    One possible explanation for the need of tryptophan to eliminate toxin is that
    serotonin' is a defensive chemical which causes diarrhea when toxic substances are
    ingested. Serotonin is derived from tryptophan.
     
  4. Jenn

    Jenn Member

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    Yes serotonin is an appetite suppressant, it puts you into hibernation. ;)
     
  5. OP
    thejazzws

    thejazzws New Member

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    Good point Jenn ;-)

    As to Mittir's point, I guess I needed to be more specific. According to Dr. Seneff Glycosate, though it doesn't disrupt specific metabolic pathways in people, it does effect a specific pathway in the bacterium that inhabit our bodies; outnumbering our own cells 10:1, that we ingest. So long story short, Tryptophan produce a chemical that helps eliminate toxins in the body from the ingestion of Glycosate, which in turn allows for macrophages to gobble up the residues. However, in this bout of irony, Glycosate slows the movement of Tryptophan into the gut, which in turn are necessary for the macrophages to do their thing. And you're probably right, that the mechanism causes diarrhea. Still, Tryptophan appears necessary for the detoxification of Glycosate.
    Lion Warrior Princess Moderator: I suppose I could ask Dr. Peat. Thanks.
     
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