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Total And Full-Fat, But Not Low-Fat, Dairy Product Intakes Are Inversely Associated With Metabolic S

Wagner83

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Joined
Oct 15, 2016
Messages
3,287
Total and Full-Fat, but Not Low-Fat, Dairy Product Intakes are Inversely Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adults
"
Abstract

Background: Growing evidence suggests that dairy products may have beneficial cardiometabolic effects. The current guidelines, however, limit the intake of full-fat dairy products.

Objective: We investigated the association of dairy consumption, types of dairy products, and dairy fat content with metabolic syndrome (MetSyn).

Methods: We analyzed baseline data of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil), a multicenter cohort study of 15,105 adults aged 35–74 y. We excluded participants with known diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, or other chronic diseases, and those who had extreme values of energy intake, leaving 9835 for analysis. Dairy consumption was assessed by a food-frequency questionnaire. We computed servings per day for total and subgroups of dairy intake. We computed a metabolic risk score (MetScore) as the mean z score of waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, HDL cholesterol (negative z score), fasting triglycerides, and fasting glucose. We performed multivariable linear regression to test the association of servings per day of dairy products with MetScore.

Results: In analyses that adjusted for demographics, menopausal status, family history of diabetes, dietary intake, nondietary lifestyle factors, and body mass index, we observed a graded inverse association for MetScore with total dairy (−0.044 ± 0.01, P = 0.009 for each additional dairy servings per day) and full-fat dairy (−0.126 ± 0.03, P < 0.001) but not with low-fat dairy intake. Associations were no longer present after additional adjustments for dairy-derived saturated fatty acids.

Conclusions: Total and especially full-fat dairy food intakes are inversely and independently associated with metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and older adults, associations that seem to be mediated by dairy saturated fatty acids. Dietary recommendations to avoid full-fat dairy intake are not supported by our findings."

This study has some limitations. We measured dairy intake and nutrients based on what participants reported in the FFQ, a typical choice in large epidemiologic studies, but this method is subject to random and systematic errors. We used cross-sectional data to identify the association of dairy consumption with the MetSyn, and because of the observational nature of our study, it is possible that our findings resulted from residual confounding despite the fact that we extensively adjusted for other dietary variables and risk factors. Strengths of this study include the direct measurements of the cardiometabolic risk factors and exclusion of subjects with known CVD, diabetes, stroke, or other chronic diseases.

The findings of this study, in which we adjusted for demographics, menopausal status, family history of diabetes, dietary intake, nondietary lifestyle factors, and BMI, suggest that greater dairy intake, especially of full-fat dairy products, may decrease the risk of MetSyn in middle-aged and older adults. Typical dietary guidelines, including the 2015 US guidelines now under review and the new Brazilian dietary guidelines published in 2014, recommend consuming low-fat instead of full-fat dairy products because of the concern that dairy fat could increase the risk for obesity and dyslipidemia (7, 12, 42). However, our findings and the literature on the association of dairy products with obesity, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes do not support dietary guidelines that recommend only a low-fat dairy intake.


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Food sources of fat may clarify the inconsistent role of dietary fat intake for incidence of type 2 diabetes. - PubMed - NCBI

"
CONCLUSIONS:
Decreased T2D risk at high intake of high- but not of low-fat dairy products suggests that dairy fat partly could have contributed to previously observed protective associations between dairy intake and T2D. Meat intake was associated with increased risk independently of the fat content."
 

raypeatclips

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Jul 8, 2016
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First thoughts are that the full fat dairy which is predominantly saturated fat improves the overall sat fat/pufa ratio of somebodys diet.

If this is true then same effects can be achieved by avoiding pufa and eating saturated fat.
 
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"A total of 26,930 individuals (61% women), aged 45-74 y, from the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort were included in the study. Dietary data were collected by using a modified diet-history method. During 14 y of follow-up, 2860 incident T2D cases were identified."

Not controlled. Not objective.

Ray Peat agreeing about the fattening effect of whole milk and high fat cheeses

"You can get fat on butter" - Ray Peat

"If you eat lots of butter or cream, it can make you fat" - Ray Peat

"I’ve mentioned at times I’ve averaged over the years probably a gallon of milk a day but that’s always been 1% milk because even at 2 quarts of milk, a person doesn’t want to have whole milk at 3 or 4% fat." -RP

"For people who aren't very active, low fat milk and cheese are better, because the extra fat calories aren't needed." -RP

"The fats in meat and cheese can be minimized by choosing low fat types, and skimmed or 1% milk can be used." -RP

"For people who don't do hard physical labor, low-fat milk is appropriate." -RP

"My recommendation is to eat to increase the metabolic rate (usually temperature and heart rate), rather than any particular foods. Usually the increased metabolic rate, with adequate protein, causes some muscle increase, and when that happens the basic calorie requirement will increase. The increase of muscle mass should continue for several weeks, and during that time the weight might increase a little, but usually the loss of water and fat will compensate for the greater muscle mass. I have heard from several people that they think I recommend drinking whole milk, which I don’t, because the amount of fat in whole milk is very likely to be fattening when a person is using it to get the needed protein and calcium. When a person wants to lose excess fat, limiting the diet to low fat milk, eggs, orange juice, and a daily carrot or two, will provide the essential nutrients without excess calories.”-RP

"Just about everything that goes wrong involves FFA increase. If they are totally saturated fatty acids, such as from coconut oil and butter, those are less harmful, but they still tend to shift the mitochondrial cellular metabolism away from using glucose and fructose and turning on various stress related things; By lowering the carbon dioxide production I think is the main mechanism."-RP
 

raypeatclips

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Joined
Jul 8, 2016
Messages
2,555
@Westside PUFAs I doubt anyone in the study was using the milk to fulfill protein needs, drinking quarts and quarts a day.

Likely the milk they drank, which is high in saturated fat, altered the sat fat/pufa ratio of their diet.

Many of his quotes talk about eating "lots" of saturated fat, which nobody in this thread has suggested yet.
 
Joined
Nov 26, 2013
Messages
7,367
"A total of 26,930 individuals (61% women), aged 45-74 y, from the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort were included in the study. Dietary data were collected by using a modified diet-history method. During 14 y of follow-up, 2860 incident T2D cases were identified."

Not controlled. Not objective.

Ray Peat agreeing about the fattening effect of whole milk and high fat cheeses

"You can get fat on butter" - Ray Peat

"If you eat lots of butter or cream, it can make you fat" - Ray Peat

"I’ve mentioned at times I’ve averaged over the years probably a gallon of milk a day but that’s always been 1% milk because even at 2 quarts of milk, a person doesn’t want to have whole milk at 3 or 4% fat." -RP

"For people who aren't very active, low fat milk and cheese are better, because the extra fat calories aren't needed." -RP

"The fats in meat and cheese can be minimized by choosing low fat types, and skimmed or 1% milk can be used." -RP

"For people who don't do hard physical labor, low-fat milk is appropriate." -RP

"My recommendation is to eat to increase the metabolic rate (usually temperature and heart rate), rather than any particular foods. Usually the increased metabolic rate, with adequate protein, causes some muscle increase, and when that happens the basic calorie requirement will increase. The increase of muscle mass should continue for several weeks, and during that time the weight might increase a little, but usually the loss of water and fat will compensate for the greater muscle mass. I have heard from several people that they think I recommend drinking whole milk, which I don’t, because the amount of fat in whole milk is very likely to be fattening when a person is using it to get the needed protein and calcium. When a person wants to lose excess fat, limiting the diet to low fat milk, eggs, orange juice, and a daily carrot or two, will provide the essential nutrients without excess calories.”-RP

"Just about everything that goes wrong involves FFA increase. If they are totally saturated fatty acids, such as from coconut oil and butter, those are less harmful, but they still tend to shift the mitochondrial cellular metabolism away from using glucose and fructose and turning on various stress related things; By lowering the carbon dioxide production I think is the main mechanism."-RP
:roll:
 

nikolabeacon

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Jun 18, 2015
Messages
326
Dairy Fat Successfully Replaced My Thyroid Medication

"
. I suspect it has more to do with the saturated fat's stabilizing effect on cells when exposed to high calcium, which causes cell excitation. Without saturated fat, calcium excitation causes mitochondrial damage and inflammation. With saturated fat calcium performs it's normal, healthy functions.

"

"
There's an article on fats in Ray's archive in which he talks about saturated fats stopping the stress response and unstaturated fats compounding the stress response, and part of the stress response is the increase of intracellular calcium, and that's generally the part which is disruptive to cell function. Since sat. Fat interrupts the stress response it helps keep calcium outside of cells where it belongs.

"

I agree that not everyone will be fine eating fat dairy but for me

I for example have problems eating skim milk amd low fat generally it seems my teeths are less painfull with extra fat

I think for people with weaker stomach acid excess fat will going to make it worse. And especially if one eat that extra fat with harder allergenic to digest starch sources.

Butter FTW :D

 

nikolabeacon

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Just a funny moment how french inspired chefs use terms "little" or "touch of cream" in cooking when it comees to butter...they knew the secret.
 

chrismeyers

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Jul 23, 2015
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There's a missing part here. If you are doing full fat milk you ABSOLUTELY need 100% grassfed milk. The fat and PUFA composition of grain and soy fed mainstream cattle is completely different. The good part is that fully grassfed milk is found basically everywhere now thanks to Organic Valley Grassmilk which I usually find easily at like 100 local grocery stores. I still prefer lower fat milk because I drink so much of it, but if going full fat thats the way to go
 

James IV

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Its likely people that drink skim milk believe cholesterol and saturated fat are unhealthy. So egg yolks, butter, cheese, meats and stews, and other nutritionally dense and long term satiating foods probably dont make up much of their diet.
In my practice, people that think satfat/cholesterol is bad, generally have the worst diets, low structural tissue density, and eat too many calories and too much carbohydrate for their lifestyle.
Endurance athletes tend to be the exception. But I don't think their lifestyle is healthy either.
 

DaveFoster

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Its likely people that drink skim milk believe cholesterol and saturated fat are unhealthy. So egg yolks, butter, cheese, meats and stews, and other nutritionally dense and long term satiating foods probably dont make up much of their diet.
In my practice, people that think satfat/cholesterol is bad, generally have the worst diets, low structural tissue density, and eat too many calories and too much carbohydrate for their lifestyle.
Endurance athletes tend to be the exception. But I don't think their lifestyle is healthy either.
This. Such a study shows very little about anything.
 

sladerunner69

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Full fat dairy made me gain a lot of fat. Im about 25 lbs heavier then i'd like to be and Im having trouble losing it. The only thing that seems to work is drinking skim milk and not eating much cheese or butter.
 

James IV

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Nov 8, 2013
Messages
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Full fat dairy made me gain a lot of fat. Im about 25 lbs heavier then i'd like to be and Im having trouble losing it. The only thing that seems to work is drinking skim milk and not eating much cheese or butter.

Eating more energy than your body can use makes you store fat.
 

sladerunner69

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Eating more energy than your body can use makes you store fat.

Yeah that's the standard advice. Fat calories are much more likely to be stored as fat than carbs though. Look at the study haidut jusst posted this morning about rats fed the human equivalent of 8k calories in coca cola and didnt gain any fat.
 

Wagner83

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How much sugar did you eat as well? How comes you're still not losing fat? Also eating full fat dairy does not mean eating loads of it, from what the researchers say full fat dairy may have advantages low fat dairy has not.
 

nikolabeacon

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Jun 18, 2015
Messages
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There's a missing part here. If you are doing full fat milk you ABSOLUTELY need 100% grassfed milk. The fat and PUFA composition of grain and soy fed mainstream cattle is completely different. The good part is that fully grassfed milk is found basically everywhere now thanks to Organic Valley Grassmilk which I usually find easily at like 100 local grocery stores. I still prefer lower fat milk because I drink so much of it, but if going full fat thats the way to go

Yes it would be better to be grassfed and it also should contain some extra vit K. I personally was drinking over 4-5 liters of skimm milk when i started to have subbtle pain in my teeths sometimes and minor interruptions with sleep. And I blamed Ca in milk and sugar.

Now with 2-3 l of 3 % milk i do not have any pain in teeths and sleep is without interruptions.

And for me eating some meat is valuable as Peat said because it enhances Ca absorption so some extra Phosphorus problem is diminished especially if there is fructose in the diet. So u need little less milk.

Natedawggh's quotes from that thread explains very well my situation and Ca excitation problem without some SFA.

I was generally eating fat dairy traditionaly before eating Peaty and I was always very lean and never had issues with weight gain or fat around abdomen with it and I noticed that there are other examples where people actually got leaner with increase in muscle mass eating fat dairy.

Eating tons of butter with starch will probably make you fat since starch requires very strong acid and with easily digestible foods , butter or other fats neutralizing acid effects are not so much of a problem.
 

chispas

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Dec 4, 2014
Messages
354
"A total of 26,930 individuals (61% women), aged 45-74 y, from the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort were included in the study. Dietary data were collected by using a modified diet-history method. During 14 y of follow-up, 2860 incident T2D cases were identified."

Not controlled. Not objective.

Ray Peat agreeing about the fattening effect of whole milk and high fat cheeses

"You can get fat on butter" - Ray Peat

"If you eat lots of butter or cream, it can make you fat" - Ray Peat

"I’ve mentioned at times I’ve averaged over the years probably a gallon of milk a day but that’s always been 1% milk because even at 2 quarts of milk, a person doesn’t want to have whole milk at 3 or 4% fat." -RP

"For people who aren't very active, low fat milk and cheese are better, because the extra fat calories aren't needed." -RP

"The fats in meat and cheese can be minimized by choosing low fat types, and skimmed or 1% milk can be used." -RP

"For people who don't do hard physical labor, low-fat milk is appropriate." -RP

"My recommendation is to eat to increase the metabolic rate (usually temperature and heart rate), rather than any particular foods. Usually the increased metabolic rate, with adequate protein, causes some muscle increase, and when that happens the basic calorie requirement will increase. The increase of muscle mass should continue for several weeks, and during that time the weight might increase a little, but usually the loss of water and fat will compensate for the greater muscle mass. I have heard from several people that they think I recommend drinking whole milk, which I don’t, because the amount of fat in whole milk is very likely to be fattening when a person is using it to get the needed protein and calcium. When a person wants to lose excess fat, limiting the diet to low fat milk, eggs, orange juice, and a daily carrot or two, will provide the essential nutrients without excess calories.”-RP

"Just about everything that goes wrong involves FFA increase. If they are totally saturated fatty acids, such as from coconut oil and butter, those are less harmful, but they still tend to shift the mitochondrial cellular metabolism away from using glucose and fructose and turning on various stress related things; By lowering the carbon dioxide production I think is the main mechanism."-RP

What makes a person so repetitive? And yet, so inconclusive?
 

chispas

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Messages
354
Yeah that's the standard advice. Fat calories are much more likely to be stored as fat than carbs though. Look at the study haidut jusst posted this morning about rats fed the human equivalent of 8k calories in coca cola and didnt gain any fat.

So then it would follow that calories from feeding empty carbs exclusively provides the rats with limited ability to hold on to their adipose tissues: because their bodies are cannibalizing their own tissues for nutrient. You know how that story ends? You could do the same thing, and lose a lot of weight, by drinking tonnes of booze everyday. A similarly short lifespan would probably befall you.

The issue I think is that protein, fat and carbs all have important nutrients that are located inside consumable materials which also possess metabolically problematic characteristics. Some are intrinsically problematic in isolation (high PUFA sausage meat, potato chips, junk food, etc), while some that are harmless become problematic in combination.

Personally, I suspect particular macronutrients just don't really go together well. Has anyone researched the relevance of the hour of the day to the type of food to eat? It's important. You don't want to eat steak at midnight, you want sweet snacks. You don't drink Coke for breakfast either. Why not? I think the body is fundamentally confused by the way we feed it because we ignore its signals. The signals are slowly fading out. Soon we'll just eat what the CIA wants.

I know people hate on Atkins, but he was smart to consider that people should try to just feed their body differently, by manipulating different macronutrients. Peat doesn't say that at all. His model supports the same Standard American Diet macro breakdown. You might disagree with Atkins biological understandings, but his method isn't stupid.
 
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