• @Blossom Is A Blessing To This Community, Let Us Be A Blessing To Her
    Click Here For More Information
  • Due to excessive bot signups along with nefarious actors we are limiting forum registration. Keep checking back for the register link to appear. Please do not send emails or have someone post to the forum asking for a signup link. Until the current climate changes we do not see a change of this policy. To join the forum you must have a compelling reason. Letting us know what skills/knowledge you will bring to the community along with the intent of your stay here will help in getting you approved.

Took too much Thyroid - now what?

sprinter

Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2013
Messages
232
I'm pretty certain I took too much Cynoplus. I was dosing 1/4th a tab for months and then upped it to 1/2 a tab for a couple months. My pulse had gone back down to 70s, so I upped it to 3/4 about 12 days ago (I know cynoplus takes about two weeks to notice effects, so maybe it's now kicking in). For the past couple days I have had diarrhea, feeling hot, and pulse is close to 100. Yesterday I was feeling feverish and now I'm feeling sick. My throat is very sore. Maybe with the change in weather (getting warmer) I shouldn't have upped my dosage.

Anyway, what is the best plan if one takes too much Cynoplus? Should I stop taking it completely for a few days? Drop it down to 1/4th a tab? Something else?

Any help appreciated.

Thanks.
 

charlie

The Law & Order Admin
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
12,370
Location
USA
When I over medicate thyroid, it takes 2-3 days to feel better. I do not stop medicating, I just find the right dose.
 

sprinter

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Nov 19, 2013
Messages
232
Thanks Charlie. Do you know if 3/4 a tab of Cynoplus sound like a lot for this time of year? Do you know what an average dose would be?
 

charlie

The Law & Order Admin
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
12,370
Location
USA
It's different for everybody. With summer kicking in less thyroid should be needed due to more light available.
 

aguilaroja

Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2013
Messages
844
sprinter said:
...I have had diarrhea, feeling hot, and pulse is close to 100. Yesterday I was feeling feverish and now I'm feeling sick. My throat is very sore....

Peat-ing and a supportive metabolism may be generally helpful, but it is still possible to have an illness, like for instance an infection. It is not necessarily easy to tell the difference between slightly high thyroid function and a mild/moderate infection. You can read about hyperthyroid symptoms on the web. But sore throat, diarrhea, and fever are not very classic indicators for high thyroid function.

In the absence of certainty, it may be wiser to reduce the amount of thyroid in the short term, down to 1/2 or 1/4 tab total at most per day in the short term. If you are really unable to function, or things persist for more than a couple of days, it is wise to seek prompt medical attention.

It is also possible that a bit more thyroid support is helpful during an acute illness. However, when not knowing the diagnosis and the long term responsive to supplementary thyroid, the guess here is that it is better to decrease supplementation and track the response as a first step.

Recommendations would be different if thyroid function rapidly becomes very high and it is clearly indicated to temporarily slow recently boosted thyroid function.

My experience is also similar to Charlie's, that in the sunnier times of year thyroid function tends to be higher and thyroid support works more quickly.
 
J

j.

Guest
aguilaroja said:
My experience is also similar to Charlie's, that in the sunnier times of year thyroid function tends to be higher and thyroid support works more quickly.

I thought that in summer, it wasn't that thyroid function was better, but that it wasn't necessary, as good thyroid function and a greater amount of energy expenditure are required to keep the body warm during winter.
 

aguilaroja

Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2013
Messages
844
j. said:
...I thought that in summer, it wasn't that thyroid function was better, but that it wasn't necessary, as good thyroid function and a greater amount of energy expenditure are required to keep the body warm during winter.

It is certainly the case the keeping core (or extremity) temperature up is difficult in the low thyroid state, and the difficulty is less in the warm months. In some cases, heat intolerance is also a symptom of hypothyroidism.

Darkness itself is a major biological stressor. Dr. Peat's insight stands in contrast to "popularizations" that discuss "stress" as being mainly emotional, and winter as a time of "seasonal affective disorder". The stress hormones increase steadily at times of prolonged darkness.

During summer in the northern latitudes, there is more daylight, and less darkness. Less darkness, there would be short periods of cortisol/estrogen/prolactin/etc stress responses. Dr. Peat has noted that ambient infrared/red light may be part of the metabolic boost. Very high latitudes, such as Alaska, Scandinavia,or northern Canada in July, can be restorative, even though they have modestly warm temperature compared to, say, deserts at lower latitudes. This seems to be an effect more of light than warmth.
--
http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/aging-eyes.shtml
"The pituitary hormones, especially prolactin and TSH, are pro-inflammatory, and darkness increases TSH along with prolactin, so to compensate for a light deficiency, the pituitary should be well-suppressed by adequate thyroid."

http://raypeat.com/articles/aging/aging ... rone.shtml
"In old age, the catabolic hormones such as cortisol are relatively dominant [Deuschle, et al., 1998], and even in youth, cortisol rises during darkness, reaching its peak around dawn. Even in young women, bone loss occurs almost entirely during the night, when cortisol is high. The hormones that are commonly said to prevent bone loss, estrogen and growth hormone, are high at night, rising along with cortisol."

http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/aging-eyes.shtml
"...darkness is a stress because it impairs mitochondrial energy production."

http://raypeat.com/articles/aging/trypt ... ging.shtml
"Stress, exercise, and darkness, increase the release of free fatty acids, and so promote the liberation of tryptophan and formation of serotonin."

http://raypeat.com/articles/aging/aging ... rone.shtml
"Since rats, that are active at night, experience the same blood thickening, it's actually the darkness, rather than sleep, that creates this “inflammatory” state."

http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/th ... ties.shtml
"I suspect that nocturnal sleep has the special function of minimizing the stress of darkness itself, and that it has subsidiary functions, including its now well confirmed role in the consolidation and organization of memory."
 

sprinter

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Nov 19, 2013
Messages
232
Thanks Aguilaroja. I dropped it down to 1/4 and am feeling a bit better today. You may be right, maybe I just got sick. It's hard to believe because since I haven't gotten sick once since I started eating a Peat diet 6 months ago (i used to get sick allot). From what I found online though, feeling feverish/hot and diarrhea are symptoms of hyperthyroid? But my pulse was not ridiculously high - still less then 100 and I did not actually have a fever.
 

aguilaroja

Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2013
Messages
844
sprinter said:
Thanks Aguilaroja. I dropped it down to 1/4 and am feeling a bit better today. You may be right, maybe I just got sick. It's hard to believe because since I haven't gotten sick once since I started eating a Peat diet 6 months ago (i used to get sick allot). From what I found online though, feeling feverish/hot and diarrhea are symptoms of hyperthyroid? But my pulse was not ridiculously high - still less then 100 and I did not actually have a fever.

It certainly could be that thyroid support was just a little bit "too effective". Though restorative metabolism improves immune function, AFAIK it is no guarantee of absolute freedom from all infection. It is a common report that when thyroid function is boosted, people with formerly frequent colds and flu go through several seasons without cold/flu symptoms.

I am no expert in hyperthyroidism. There are reports of increased bowel frequency in hyperthyroid cases, but AFAIK there are other features that are much more prominent. When I have seen apparently high thyroid function in friends after Peat-y measures, there has not been mention of diarrhea.

I should have distinguished better between feeling feverish, and measured high body temperature. but that is also tricky. For those in a chronically low thyroid function state, someone with a low baseline body temperature may have a "fever equivalent" when the temperature is, say, 100 degrees F/37.7 C. That is, a "slight temperature" by usual standards may be a whopping temperature if the usual baseline for the person is 2 degrees lower than normal. (This happened to me for occasionally for years [pre-Peat], and no one would take me seriously with a "mild" fever even though I was severely ill.)

I was just saying that some of the features of infections and of accelerated thyroid function may be tricky to distinguish. The remedies differ depending on the condition. It's good to hear things are better.
 

Similar threads

Top