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TocoVit - Liquid Vitamin E From Wheat Germ Oil

Dan W

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Intriguing stuff, thanks as usual Haidut. I'll share this, I bet there's tons of people that would like to experiment with it.

Do you know the approximate ratio of the different tocopherols? Do you think it includes any significant amount of tocotrienols?
 

Kennya

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Does the Tocovit need to be mixed with anything like olive or coconut oil for smooth application? Or is straight application sufficient?
 

cpaqf1

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"the supplement should be kept in a dark location at room temperature to maintain its liquid form and proper vitamin E content"

If I buy multiple bottle, can I keep the spares in the fridge? the wording of "maintain proper vitamin E content" has me wondering.
 

Koveras

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Based on the chemical analysis the vendor supplied, some of the additional substances present in WGO and hence in TocoVit include plant sterols and terpenes such as squalene.

Can you post the analysis?
 

haidut

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Intriguing stuff, thanks as usual Haidut. I'll share this, I bet there's tons of people that would like to experiment with it.

Do you know the approximate ratio of the different tocopherols? Do you think it includes any significant amount of tocotrienols?

I don't think there are any significant amounts of tocotrienols. The breakdown is roughly 60% alpha tocopherol, 20% delta tocopherol, 10% gamma tocopherol and 10% beta tocopherol. I will post a more specific analysis in the original post when I get the formal paperwork from the vendor.
 

haidut

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Does the Tocovit need to be mixed with anything like olive or coconut oil for smooth application? Or is straight application sufficient?

It already has some MCT to make it more liquid. But it is still mostly the actual vitamin E product and I know Ray said for topical absorption a 50% / 50% mix is best. So, you may want to add about as much olive or coconut oil as the liquid in the bottle, which is 30ml.
 

haidut

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"the supplement should be kept in a dark location at room temperature to maintain its liquid form and proper vitamin E content"

If I buy multiple bottle, can I keep the spares in the fridge? the wording of "maintain proper vitamin E content" has me wondering.

Vitamin E, just like vitamin K and vitamin B2 is sensitive to bright sunlight. So, it's best kept in the dark. Yes, you can keep the bottles in the fridge but it may solidify. I have not tried it in the fridge so don't know for sure what will happen :):
 

haidut

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haidut

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Just a note, the link for Tocovit on the idealabsdc site goes to the Mitolipin page. o_O

Thanks for letting me know, I just fixed it!
 

lindsay

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This sounds amazing! Definitely going to buy this when I get paid next. That being said, I know you cannot sanction internal use, but do you think it would be a terrible thing to put the drops (even half a dose) in a gelatin capsule and gulp it down? Or do you think it would be more effective as a topical agent? I would be nervous it would all end up on my clothing, like Progest-E.
 

haidut

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This sounds amazing! Definitely going to buy this when I get paid next. That being said, I know you cannot sanction internal use, but do you think it would be a terrible thing to put the drops (even half a dose) in a gelatin capsule and gulp it down? Or do you think it would be more effective as a topical agent? I would be nervous it would all end up on my clothing, like Progest-E.

Oh, I think it would be very effective orally, in a capsule or just as the pure liquid. I just can't endorse such use :):
 

lindsay

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P.S. @haidut. Do you know a comparative analysis of a Vitamin E oil from Wheat Germ versus Palm Oil? I believe Palm Oil is rich in Tocotrienols. Perhaps it is worthwhile incorporating both kinds into the supplemental routine?
 

lindsay

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Oh, I think it would be very effective orally, in a capsule or just as the pure liquid. I just can't endorse such use :)

I guess I will have to be a guinea pig then :) I love Vitamin E.
 

heartnhands

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As many of the forum members know, the vitamin E supplements currently sold in most countries have nothing in common with the original vitamin E used in the first half of the 20th century. Back then, vitamin E was commonly extracted from wheat germ oil (WGO) and it contained a number of "impurities" that may have influenced the results seen in those earlier studies. In the last 50 years, virtually all commercially sold vitamin E has been extracted from soybeans as WGO has become very expensive. This soy-derived vitamin E is often sold as a single isomer (i.e. alpha tocopherol, or gamma tocopherol), or if it is the mixed tocopherols the product typically does not contain any of the originally found "impurities".
Ray has written about the shocking difference between the modern vitamin E found in stores and the one his advisor used in the early 20th century.

Is it OK to only have vitamin E succinate
"...My thesis adviser, Arnold Soderwall, did some studies showing that vitamin E extended fertility considerably. I found some of his old Sigma (chemical company) vitamin E still in the freezer, and I was working on the idea that oxidative catalysts in the liver were directly related to estrogen's effects. I would extract lipids from the liver, and use paper chromatography to separate them, and for reference points I used the vitamin E and different quinones (coenzyme Q10, Q6, and benzoquinone). I happened to mix the vitamin E with one of the quinones, and noticed that it turned almost black; all of the quinones had the same effect. Putting the mixture on the paper, the moving solvent separated the original components. Delocalized electrons absorb low energy light, causing a dark color (as in black semiconductors), and Szent-Gyorgyi had expressed wonder about what could cause the dark color of the healthy liver, a color that can't be extracted as a pigment. This experiment convinced me that vitamin E could be one of the participants in delocalizing electrons for activating proteins in the way S-G suggested. However, the technology for manufacturing vitamin E has changed greatly over the years, and I have never found anything sold as vitamin E that produces the same dark colors as that old stuff from the freezer. I don't know whether the powerfully therapeutic (anti-estrogenic, clot-clearing, anti-inflammatory, quinone-reactive) old vitamin E contained "impurities" that were effective, or whether it's that the newer materials contain impurities that reduce their effects. It was labeled d-alphatocopherol, but it was semi-solid, like crystallized honey."

I have long been fascinated with vitamin E and its anti-estrogenic effects and have been on a quest to find a product that comes as close as possible to the one Ray described. After more than a year of fruitless search, I finally found a vendor in Europe that was willing to extract vitamin E from wheat germ oil and to sell it in its unadulterated form. This is what our newest supplement TocoVit contains - the mixed tocopherols extracted from WGO, together with various "impurities" Ray mentions above. Based on the chemical analysis the vendor supplied, some of the additional substances present in WGO and hence in TocoVit include plant sterols and terpenes such as squalene. These undoubtedly have hormonal effects as shown by various studies using them separately. I don't know if TocoVit will be able to match the original product Ray's advisor bought from Sigma, but it is as close to the original as I could find. Interestingly enough, when left undisturbed for several days the product does begin to crystalize much like old honey as Ray also mentions above and it has a much darker color than the other high-purity mixed tocopherols I have bought and used over the years from chemical vendors like Sigma.
To the people who decide to try TocoVit it will be immediately obvious that it is unlike any other vitamin E supplement on the market. In addition, to its dark color (as Ray mentions above) TocoVit also has a very distinctive taste and smells of WGO (naturally). The taste is best described as a combination of the bitterness of fresh olive oil and the buttery taste of tahini. To the people with allergies - while the TocoVit contains some triglycerides of saturated fatty acids, it has no significant amount of free oils and should not contain any allergenic protein or flavone residues. However, please consult with your doctor before using.


*******************************************************************************
TocoVit is a liquid, mixed tocopherol supplement extracted from wheat germ oil (WGO). As such, in addition to its high proportion of alpha-tocopherol it also contains a number of other ingredients extracted from the WGO that may have hormonal and metabolic effects on their own. These additional ingredients include plant sterols, triglycerides of saturated fatty acids, terpenes such as squalene, and even trace amounts of terpenoids such as lanosterol. TocoVit may crystalize then cooled and is also sensitive to bright sunlight. Thus, the supplement should be kept in a dark location at room temperature to maintain its liquid form and proper vitamin E content. This product, while consisting entirely of food-grade ingredients, is sanctioned for external use only.

Servings per container: about 30
Serving size: 20 drops
Each serving contains the following ingredients:

Vitamin E (from wheat germ oil): 400 IU

Other ingredients: sterols, triglycerides, terpenes (e.g. squalene), terpenoids (e.g. lanosterol)
*******************************************************************************
Sounds really great. I'm a massage therapist and my clients trust me to make suggestions about various alternatives...I've been meaning to ask you how I might offer some of your suppliments. This looks like a great addition to ease up extra seretonin.
Fingers crossed.

Good luck!
 

haidut

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Sounds really great. I'm a massage therapist and my clients trust me to make suggestions about various alternatives...I've been meaning to ask you how I might offer some of your suppliments. This looks like a great addition to ease up extra seretonin.
Fingers crossed.

Good luck!

Well, there are no retsrictions on reselling and since there is no logo on the bottles the clients won't even know these are supplements from another vendor. As far as I know some people already do that - i.e. they have fitness or nutritional consulting practice and re-sell our supplements. It does not really matter to me as long as people are getting good results :):
 

DesertRat

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Since it derives from wheat germ oil, is there any chance it could be problematic for gluten sensitive or celiac individuals?
 

cpaqf1

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Vitamin E, just like vitamin K and vitamin B2 is sensitive to bright sunlight. So, it's best kept in the dark. Yes, you can keep the bottles in the fridge but it may solidify. I have not tried it in the fridge so don't know for sure what will happen :)

I see, and it wouldn't go back to normal at room temp, right?
 

haidut

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Since it derives from wheat germ oil, is there any chance it could be problematic for gluten sensitive or celiac individuals?

I guess it is possible, but the vendor told me that all potential allergens have been removed. I would start low and increase if there are no signs of allergy.
 

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