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Titanium Dioxide Is Toxic And Pro-diabetic

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Apr 1, 2015.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    It looks like Ray is right again, and has a very good reason to be avoiding supplements and/or foods with titanium dioxide (TO) in them. I think he even said that the main mechanism of action is the nano-sized particles in the TO used in supplements get through the blood vessels and cause chronic immune reactions and inflammation, which as we know are implicated in diabetes. The study below confirms most of Ray's statements, including the un-safety of even regular (not nano-sized) TO.
    I wonder if there is a similar study showing bad effects of silicon dioxide.

    http://suppversity.blogspot.com/2015/04 ... s-are.html
    "...This does not change the fact that cell studies revealed that cells treated with TiO2 nanoparticles showed a series of morphological changes, including decreased cell size, membrane blebbing, peripheral chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation (Gurevitch. 2012; Hussain. 2010), as well as inflammatory problems specifically of the digestive tract (Schneider. 2007), but it still highlights that the nano-version of the common food ingredient E171 (TiO2) which is particularly high in foods like candies, sweets, and chewing gums (see Figure 2), may be something to keep in mind, when we investigate the effects of these foods and personal care products, toothpastes and select sunscreens which contain 1% to 10% titanium by weight on our health."

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... 0/abstract
    "...There have been few reports about the possible toxic effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on the endocrine system. We explored the endocrine effects of oral administration to mice of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles (0, 64 and 320 mg kg–1 body weight per day to control, low‐dose and high‐dose groups, respectively, 7 days per week for 14 weeks). TiO2 nanoparticles were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS), and their physiological distribution was investigated by inductively coupled plasma. Biochemical analyzes included plasma glucose, insulin, heart blood triglycerides (TG), free fatty acid (FFA), low‐density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL‐C), high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL‐C), total cholesterol (TC), tumor necrosis factor‐alpha (TNF‐α), interleukin (IL)‐6 and reactive oxygen species (ROS)‐related markers (total SOD, GSH and MDA). Phosphorylation of IRS1, Akt, JNK1, and p38 MAPK were analyzed by western blotting. Increased titanium levels were found in the liver, spleen, small intestine, kidney and pancreas. Biochemical analyzes showed that plasma glucose significantly increased whereas there was no difference in plasma insulin secretion. Increased ROS levels were found in serum and the liver, as evidenced by reduced total SOD activity and GSH level and increased MDA content. Western blotting showed that oral administration of TiO2 nanoparticles induced insulin resistance (IR) in mouse liver, shown by increased phosphorylation of IRS1 (Ser307) and reduced phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473). The pathway by which TiO2 nanoparticles increase ROS‐induced IR were included in the inflammatory response and phosphokinase, as shown by increased serum levels of TNF‐α and IL‐6 and increased phosphorylation of JNK1 and p38 MAPK in liver. These results show that oral administration of TiO2 nanoparticles increases ROS, resulting in IR and increasing plasma glucose in mice."
     
  2. uuy8778yyi

    uuy8778yyi Member

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    which supplements contain this ?
     
  3. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Tons of them, especially the tablet forms. Just look at the label. Pretty much any tablet supplement from stores like CVS or RiteAid will list TO on the label.
     
  4. Jellyfish

    Jellyfish Member

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    Not only supplements, but many cosmetics contain titanium dioxide.
     
  5. Peata

    Peata Member

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    It's even in Ranch salad dressing.
     
  6. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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  7. you

    you Member

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    It's also in sunscreen!
     
  8. tara

    tara Member

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    If it's in large enough particles, maybe it's doing some good in sunscreen by reflecting the UV, and not so much risk? In tablets it doesn't do anything good for a person (just a tabletting aid).
    I've been using non-nano-sized zinc oxide in sunscreen on this assumption.

    Unfortunately, where I am they seem to get away with selling supplements and medicines with just 'tabletting aids' on the packet.
     
  9. BingDing

    BingDing Member

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    FWIW, Cliff posted this in the RP Quotes thread:

    Q: Do you think zinc oxide is the least harmful commercially available sunscreen?
    A: Yes

    Of course, he didn't know about haidut's sunscreen at the time.
     
  10. you

    you Member

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    I'm confused. This thread is about titanium dioxide, not zinc oxide.
     
  11. tara

    tara Member

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    Yes, it is about titanium dioxide.
    I was just drawing a parallel between the two, and wondering how far the similarities went. I think Peat's objections to titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide in suppplements etc are at least partly, if not wholly, about the physical particles passing through the gut wall and into general circulation, where they can cause issues, including blocking capillaries, setting of stress reactions, etc. So I was speculating that if the particles of titanium dioxide are big enough not to pass through the skin, they would not pose a threat in sunscreen, and might do some good. That seems to be Peat's view on [edit:] zinc oxide, and I was thinking the same might apply to titanium dioxide.
     
  12. Dan Wich

    Dan Wich Member

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    I've been speculating along the exact same lines.

    Here's some analysis of the absorption of "nano" sized zinc oxide (page 40 onwards): http://ec.europa.eu/health/scientific_c ... _o_103.pdf

    As far as I can tell, a big reason manufacturers use smaller zinc oxide or titanium dioxide particles in topical products is to prevent them from leaving an opaque white layer. So I think it's actually a good sign when a product gets negative reviews for going on "too white".

    I'd personally choose zinc oxide or titanium dioxide in a conventional sunscreen over any other active ingredient. Ingestion is another matter entirely :lol:
     

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  13. tara

    tara Member

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    Yes. My kids and i look like ghosts if apply my home made (not nano-sized) stuff generously. And even with it light enough to not scare the supersticious, I'm still convinced it worked, because i got a couple of bad burns on limited areas where I figure I must have missed a bit, while the rest of me was fine.
     
  14. jyb

    jyb Member

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    Some classic pharma drugs also have this. So, if you take pills from your doctor's prescription, you might be getting some TiO2 for free!
     
  15. Soren

    Soren Member

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    What about if it's in activated charcoal tablets. Any chance the charcoal will just absorb it and stop it getting into the body?
     
  16. bzmazu

    bzmazu Member

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    Good question.....
     
  17. shepherdgirl

    shepherdgirl Member

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    I am experimenting with adding natural pigments to some commercial zinc oxide sunblock so it blends with my skin instead of being bright white. i plan to make homemade non nano zinc oxide sunblock too, and tint it similarly. does anyone have any good recipes??
    when i have used the chemical sunblocks in the past (i.e. oxybenzone, etc. etc.) it always felt like my skin was damaged after their use, although there was no sunburn.
     
  18. TubZy

    TubZy Member

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    check your toothpaste as well...
     
  19. cyclops

    cyclops Member

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    Anything one can do or take to offset the damage of having consumed this (titanium dioxide) for a while?
     
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