• Rest in Paradise,
    Raymond Franklin Peat  October 12, 1936 - November 24 2022

    Remembering Ray Peat Call-In Show with Georgi Dinkov

    Ray Peat Email Advice Depository

  • tca300: I understand this is off topic from what you typically teach, but I was wondering if you have run across any information or learned on your own, things that help people grieve over lost loved ones, and or fear of losing others to death? Thank you!

    Ray Peat: It activates the “helplessness” reactions in the body, stress weakening your own life, and I think it can help to get out of that if you think of your life as a continuation of theirs—the same life, though with fewer bodies.

    Rest in Paradise, Raymond Peat  October 12, 1936 - November 24 2022

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The return of morphogenesis in medicine

haidut

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Ray has written quite a bit about biological fields (as opposed to mechanical / genetic dogmas) and their relevance to human health and disease. I have been noticing quite a few new studies popping up in the last few years, but these two caught the attention of the general public and are now being hotly debated on sites like Reddit and several blogs related to Chris Kessler.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3413735/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25528755

The first one is a very good review of the history of morphogenetic fields and it reads pretty much like Peat wrote it himself.
 
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And everyone gets surprised when a 3D matrix can produce miniature organs :ss
 

haidut

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tara

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Such_Saturation said:
post 97883 Yeah, things are moving quickly it looks like. I think you also posted http://www.nature.com/news/the-boom-in- ... re-1.18064
This is cool.
A liver bud is still a far cry from an entire liver — a hefty, multi-lobed organ composed of tens of billions of hepatocytes. But Takebe hopes that if he can infuse many thousands of buds into a failing organ, he might be able to rescue enough of its function to make a transplant unnecessary. The process seems to work in mice. When Takebe and his group transplanted a dozen of the buds into mouse abdomens, they saw dramatic effects. Within two days, the buds had connected up with the mouse's blood supply, and the cells went on to develop into mature liver cells that were able to make liver-specific proteins and to metabolize drugs. To mimic liver failure, the team wiped out the animals' natural liver function with a toxic drug. After a month, most of the control mice had died, but most of those that received liver bud transplants had survived.
Wow!
 
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