The Consensus On St. John's Wort Tea?

Discussion in 'Ask For Help or Advice' started by Astolfo, Oct 16, 2020 at 2:12 PM.

Tags:
  1. Astolfo

    Astolfo Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2018
    Messages:
    553
    Gender:
    Male
    How does it affect neurotransmitters and receptors counts/sensitivity/densities in the brain? What therapeutic uses does it have? What could be the reason that it works for me? (cognitive enchanment and improvement in the hedonic tone after fluoxetine induced pssd)

    Also wider field of view and more dopaminergic feeling. Could it be dopamine/noradrenaline disinhibition?

    In vitro receptor screening of pure constituents of St. John's wort reveals novel interactions with a number of GPCRs - PubMed

    Norepinephrine–dopamine disinhibitor - Wikipedia
     
  2. dukesbobby777

    dukesbobby777 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2020
    Messages:
    23
    Gender:
    Male
    The herb contains many constituents, most notably hyperforin and hypericum. Wikipedia doesn’t say anything about the pharmacology of hypericum, but the hyperforin Wikipedia page says that it enhances NE, dopamine, 5HT, GABA and glutamate through inhibiting reuptake of these neurotransmitters.

    Apparently it also upregulates 5HT2A and has an interaction at the 5HT1A receptor as well (which I cannot recall).


    It’s good fun to use, as it can make you feel really good but, if you are bipolar/schizo, it’s not a good idea to use it. My mood would swing from euphoric to angry within minutes whilst trying out many brands, and so it wasn’t very good for me. But i imagine for certain mood disorders, it can work wonders for others.

    I’ve never tried it in tea form. Just supplements.
     
  3. Frankdee20

    Frankdee20 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2017
    Messages:
    2,903
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Intensive Case Manager
    Location:
    Sun Coast, USA
    That 5ht2a ***t gives me anxiety and contributes to neuroticisms
     
Loading...