"The common causes of hypothyroidism are..."

Discussion in 'Ray Peat Quotes' started by narouz, Feb 4, 2013.

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  1. narouz

    narouz Member

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    -Ray Peat, From PMS to Menopause: Female Hormones in Context

    (I particularly like that "breathless exercise instead of a stimulating life."
    Peat to all us exercisers: "Get a life!" :lol: )
     
  2. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Fine, it's time to get stimulated. Wait what? :holysheep
     
  3. biggirlkisss

    biggirlkisss Member

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    Down with raw vegan eating.
     
  4. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    My doctor is a vegan. Imagine that.
     
  5. gretchen

    gretchen Member

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    I think I've been hypothyroid since I was a teen.
     
  6. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    I think I was hypothyroid since conception. :(
     
  7. OP
    narouz

    narouz Member

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    I'm trying.... :roll:
    Gotta be a bit of gap there, huh? :)
     
  8. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Oh, and he is a long distance runner. He looks very frail.
     
  9. OP
    narouz

    narouz Member

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    It's the Peat diet/exercise program from hell. :?
     
  10. gretchen

    gretchen Member

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    Yeah, actually..... :? I was cold a lot as a kid and hardly ate anything. Overeating was never my problem, not even as a teen really. My mom was not a big eater either; neither parent is.
     
  11. jyb

    jyb Member

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    I think I was too. As far as I can remember, as a kid I always had issues with being cold, acne, lethargic, brain fog, light sleep then insomnia... It seems like this forum has a few other hypothyroid members who are young and therefore might have been hypo quite early on too.

    My worry is that maybe we're in a different situation than those getting hypo later in life and are able to go back to normal with a Peat diet or thyroid supps. I don't know if the latter is a possibility for me.

    My opinion on Peating so far - at 26 yrs old and after less than a year of Peat - is that it really feels like the right thing to do and my condition has greatly improved. However I still have some issues, and I will probably always have some unless I find a way to fix my temps which I just cannot manage to increase and reach healthy levels despite a strict diet and supplements (thyroid, pregnelonone, progesterone etc). My hope is that there are some Peat ideas that I haven't explored yet, or that I will heal by continuing Peating over time.
     
  12. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Once I get enough thyroid in me, temps and heart rate come up nicely. Hang in there jyb. You will get it figured out.
     
  13. SheilaHelm1

    SheilaHelm1 Member

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    I'm 43 and been hypo since age 5, it has definitely affected bone health.. and bone shape I think. Broda Barnes mentions that bones can grow oddly in hypo patients leading to problems later in life. Boy was he right!!! Dear Dispersible Aspirin - I love you.xx
     
  14. OP
    narouz

    narouz Member

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    jyb-
    You may've stated it somewhere already,
    but...what kind and dosage of thyroid are you taking?
    Have you been diagnosed?
    Brief thyroid supplement history?
     
  15. jyb

    jyb Member

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    Per day 1 cynomel and 1-2 cynoplus. I cut each pill into 8 approx. Tried NDT Thiroyd instead of cynomel but I didn't notice a difference.

    Before supps, TSH were 5-6 based on 2 measurements, and had <0.01 TSH on supps based on 1 measurement.

    My temps are not always correlated to my energy. I've had time when I felt good, yet temps were around 97.7 and vice-versa. But clearly I'm hypo based on temps and symptoms like energy, in the afternoon I don't go below 97.7 but its common for me to have a maximum temps of 98.1. My pulses however seem ok (usually 80+, sometimes 90+).
     
  16. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Jyb, have you tried aspirin? For me, aspirin, salt and thyroid seem to be the combination that creates the most heat.
     
  17. OP
    narouz

    narouz Member

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    jyb-
    I had this kind of a situation with my combo (either Cynoplus or NDT) thyroid supplementation:
    when I increased dosage enough to get my temps/pulses up to where they Peatishly should be,
    my tests would come back high RT3 and miniscule TSH.

    The extremely low TSH could be regarded as good by Peat,
    except for the fact that he doesn't think the test is very reliable at assessing thyroid function.
    My doctor interpreted the teensy TSH as indicating "over-corrected" thyroid function--
    that is, I was taking too much thyroid supp.

    He also saw the high RT3 as backing that up:
    too much RT3 resulting from too much thyroid medication.

    Now Peat wouldn't interpret those tests that way, I don't think.
    First, as I've said, he doesn't trust TSH testing as an accurate indicator of thyroid function,
    though he does tend to think the lower the better.
    And I think he feels the same way about RT3--that is: just not reliable in assessing thyroid function.

    Peat does say that for some people T4 can not only be ineffective, but counter-effective.
    It can be anti-metabolic.
    Seems that that is about as far as Peat goes down the road of Thyroid Resistance
    in the sense of it being caused by excess T4 (from too much T4-containing supplements).

    But that would seem at least to open the door for treatments like the RT3 Yahoo groups,
    which seem to come from Kurt Holtorf, John Lowe, and perhaps Paul Robinson.
    That is, so the theory goes: in some people, T4 clogs up the receptors,
    blocking T3 conversion/absorption at various sites in the body.
    The protocol is to take only T3, which in many people--after about 3 months--"clears" those receptors,
    and then T3 can be used normally by the body.

    There are a lot of possible explanative theories for why people taking thyroid supplements
    still aren't able to raise their metabolism beyond a certain point.
    The excess-T4-clogging-receptors is just one,
    which is not really Peatian, but can be seen as in some ways consonant with Peatian views.
    Other Peatian explanations are various deficiencies, like vitamin A, or magnesium, or red light, etc.
    Or toxicity from PUFA.

    Going back to my decision to try the T3-Only protocol:
    it could be that before doing that
    I just needed to disregard my doctor's interpretation--
    that I was taking too much supplement--
    and just go higher in my doses of Cynoplus or NDT.
    This is possible.
    I would note that, I did try that for a couple of months,
    going from 150mg of Armour to 210 mg.
    I felt about the same.
    But my temps/pulses did respond, as I recall: my temps and pulses did go up.
    I just didn't feel much, if any, better.
    Not an adequate experiment.

    So...to come back to your inability, jyb, to adequately raise you metabolism (temps anyhow):
    what happens when you increase your thyroid supplement dosage?
     
  18. j.

    j. Guest

    One explanation he gave was that some people's liver don't convert T4 to T3 well, and the T4 one takes also shuts down thyroid gland activity and therefore T3 production, so one ends up with even less T3.
     
  19. OP
    narouz

    narouz Member

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    Yes.
    So he seems to see a different mechanism of "thyroid resistance" than the Yahoo RT3'ers, Holtorf, Lowe, etc.
    Most of those guys seem to think the mechanism is the T3 "receptors" getting clogged with excess T4.
    I put receptors in quotes because Peat seems to,
    by which I think he is reminding that he doesn't buy into that way of seeing that cellular mechanism.
    I think he sees it as part and parcel of the "lock and key" notion of hormones and receptors, which he disagrees with.

    Still...I figure Holtorf et al may have the wrong overall vision and wrong mechanism,
    but yet may still have come up with a legitimate treatment.
    That is: it works, but not exactly for the reasons they propose.
     
  20. Nick810

    Nick810 Member

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    Did years of beans.... undercooked brocolli etc and chronic cardio....

    If only I knew then what I knew now :(
     
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