Teflon Detox

Discussion in 'Toxins, Detoxification' started by johns74, Nov 5, 2014.

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  1. johns74

    johns74 Member

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    Websites claim that if we have our blood contaminated with teflon toxins, there's no way to detox. To get rid of them, the only thing one can do is avoid exposure for 20 years.

    Is this correct? Is there no way to detox from Teflon toxins?
     
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    johns74

    johns74 Member

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    johns74

    johns74 Member

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    What's the alternative? Is enamel-coated ceramic cookware safe?
     
  4. pboy

    pboy Member

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    well I know Teflon is toxic, but I doubt it would take 20 years to clear out...its probably just like any other toxin, where with powerful glutathione, glucuronic acid, and overall metabolism, youll clear it pretty fast, max few months to a few years with the more difficult things.

    Yea enamel is fine as long as it isn't chipped too bad and the iron exposed. Theres 2 types of stainless steel and one is fine, the other might leach some stuff...I forgot the exact names and what to look for, but I think its been discussed here. Copper would be better but its really expensive and I think hard to keep. Cast iron isn't ideal cause the iron that rubs off is offensive to the GI tract and whole metabolism if it gets in in larger amounts.

    Ceramic and glass mugs are great for things that don't require cooking...that you might just heat in a microwave, like liquids...or of course to drink coffee or tea, cocoa, milk, whatever in...fruit juice

    I think there are some specialty style cooking tools that are of pure heat resistant ceramic...which would probably be good also
     
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    johns74

    johns74 Member

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    I think there's a Peat quote where he says copper cookware instantly reacts with vegetables in a bad way, and also with fats.
     
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    johns74

    johns74 Member

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    My simple mind is thinking, if I were to be intoxicated with something, I'd rather be with a familiar toxin, like iron, which also happens to be essential so the body has a way to deal with it. So enamel-coated iron seems to win. Stainless steel I think has nickel or other things that are just purely toxic, they serve no healthy function.
     
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    johns74

    johns74 Member

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    It would be nice to have more info about that, if anyone knows.
     
  8. marcar72

    marcar72 Member

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    There's Corning Vision cookware. I got a 10' glass skillet w/lid and like a 4 quart glass pot w/lid. I don't think they leech much of anything at least I'm hoping not... :2cents
     
  9. loess

    loess Member

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    I wish I could get over the fear that I have of Corning Visionware exploding on me, because I've found a few sets for cheap and like to try it out. But I always pass them up. Same species of fear that makes me tense up when changing guitar strings or doing anything with a car battery/jumper cables!
     
  10. tara

    tara Member

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    I think you'd have to be pretty skilled to manage this - I'm enjoying the image. :D

    My guess is you are right, that something like iron, that we have systems to deal with even if we can get overloaded, is less of a problem than teflon, which we don't. Nickel and lead would both be a lot worse than iron. I have heard, but not confirmed, that the enamel is bound to the metal in pans with lead - that's why chips are a problem.

    I agree with you. I'm pretty sure glass is the thing that leaches least, if anything. Ceramics can depend on what's in the glaze - there have been cases of lead poisoning from lead glazed ceramics, but one would hope those are not sold as cooking pans.

    Me too. I happily use glass baking dishes in the oven, but I don't trust myself to use them safely on the stove top.

    The difference between different kinds of stainless steel is at least in part about how much nickel they contain. I think Peat said that the ones you can stick a fridge magnet to have less nickel, and are safer (forgotten the specification numbers). There is at least one other thread discussing this.
     
  11. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    18/10
     
  12. marcar72

    marcar72 Member

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    You know I've been thinking of this fear and I think I'm gonna get some safety glasses to wear while cooking on the stovetop with Corning Visionware. Maybe a lab coat too, just joking w/ the lab coat... hehehe! :lol:
     
  13. loess

    loess Member

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    Safety glasses are not a bad idea at all. Now as for me, I wouldn't set foot in a Visionware-equipped kitchen with anything less than a full medieval suit of body armor. I think there are probably more than a few of us around here who graduated to lab coat status and have transformed their kitchen into a science experiment playground! Put a nice embroidered patch on the breast pocket that says "Peatologist". :mrgreen:
     
  14. tara

    tara Member

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    johns74

    johns74 Member

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    In studies, they test the blood for PFOA. Is there a place one can get that test, or is it just available for research?

    If we can't test PFOA directly, apparently it's correlated with liver enzymes, so one could test for that.

    Source
     
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    johns74

    johns74 Member

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    johns74

    johns74 Member

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    Cholestyramine significantly increases the excretion of common PFCs, including PFOA (the teflon toxin).

    Link

    Don't know anything about it's safety. Maybe the raw carrot would do the same thing.

    Blood extraction could help too, since PFOA accumulates in the blood.
     
  18. tara

    tara Member

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    Then raw carrot and activated charcoal might help carry this away with less reabsorption.
     
  19. DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    I believe 18/10 has nickel, and 18/0 does not, so 18/0's safer.
     
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