Sudden Psychosis

Discussion in 'Mental Issues' started by Mad, May 16, 2017.

  1. Mad

    Mad Member

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    I'm hoping to get insights here/see if anything stands out to anyone that could be helpful.
    My older sister is 28. She has always had special needs - she has a condition called Sotos Syndrome. Here is a basic description:
    Sotos syndrome is a disorder characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, overgrowth in childhood, and learning disabilities or delayed development of mental and movement abilities. Characteristic facial features include a long, narrow face; a high forehead; flushed (reddened) cheeks; and a small, pointed chin. In addition, the outside corners of the eyes may point downward (down-slanting palpebral fissures). This facial appearance is most notable in early childhood. Affected infants and children tend to grow quickly; they are significantly taller than their siblings and peers and have an unusually large head. However, adult height is usually in the normal range.
    People with Sotos syndrome often have intellectual disability, and most also have behavioral problems. Frequent behavioral issues include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), phobias, obsessions and compulsions, tantrums, and impulsive behaviors. Problems with speech and language are also common. Affected individuals often have a stutter, a monotone voice, and problems with sound production. Additionally, weak muscle tone (hypotonia) may delay other aspects of early development, particularly motor skills such as sitting and crawling.
    Other signs and symptoms of Sotos syndrome can include an abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis), seizures, heart or kidney defects, hearing loss, and problems with vision. Some infants with this disorder experience y
    ellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice) and poor feeding.


    She has always been special, but otherwise very smart, has a great memory, very social, loves people, takes some social cues, etc.
    A year and a half ago, it was like a flip was switched and she has not been the same since. She developed severe psychosis, was talking to voices, making strange jerking motions with her head, saying she saw people and things that we didn't see. You couldn't even get her to look at you; she couldn't hear us when we spoke. She was in another world. You had to yell her name to get her attention. For the first several days/weeks, she was barely sleeping. She was up at all hours of the night, going outside randomly, walking around. She was very aggressive and spoke of evil things and hurting people. My parents feared for her safety, as well as for their own. They had to admit her to the mental health ward at the hospital. Needless to say, that time was VERY taxing on my parents. They didn't feel the desire to go on in life anymore.

    My sister has shown improvements since then. Some days now, she even seems to be back to normal. Other days, it's nearly as bad as in the beginning. They have done every testing you can think of. No doctors seem to be able to have any idea of what has happened to her so my parents have been left to do the best research that they can.
    They have altered her diet extremely as per her allergy testing results. She is now dairy free, gluten free.
    She is currently taking Levoxyl (T4 only) and a low dose anti-depressant.

    I saw this article of Ray's and it sparked an idea in me: Gelatin, stress, longevity

    In the context of the excitatory actions of estrogen, and the inhibitory action of glycine, it would be reasonable to think of glycine as one of the antiestrogenic substances. Another type of amino acid, taurine, is structurally similar to glycine (and to beta amino propanoic acid, and to GABA), and it can be thought of as antiestrogenic in this context. The specific kinds of excitation produced by estrogen that relate to reproduction occur against a background of very generalized cellular excitation, that includes increased sensitivity of sensory nerves, increased activity of motor nerves, changes in the EEG, and, if the estrogen effect is very high, epilepsy, tetany, or psychosis.

    Not only did the psychosis stand out, but she has also suffered from epilepsy since her teens.
    So I asked my Mom if my sister had had her sex hormones tested. She sent me the results of a test she had gotten in January 2017:
    Estrogen = 54.0 (reference range given: 27.0-62.0)
    Progesterone = 22.0 (reference range given: 6.0-20.0)
    Testosterone = 11.1 (reference range given: 4.0-14.0)

    I was hoping to see a clear pattern of estrogen dominance, but that just doesn't seem to be the case to me. I was hoping that if I did see estrogen dominance, we could try a high dose of Progest-E for her.

    Does anyone still think this is a good plan to give a try? Any other thoughts?

    One side note: the estrogen seemed to also be a likely culprit because since she has been doing better the past few months with her new diet, she is still constantly cycling between her "good days" and "bad days". I asked my Mom how long she thinks these cycles go - she said about two weeks good and about two weeks bad. That sounds like a female hormonal cycle to me!! She said now that she thinks about it, my sister's worst days are the couple of weeks after her period (when estrogen spikes) and then she has a couple of good weeks (when estrogen lowers).

    Every suggestion is appreciated.
     
  2. Optimus

    Optimus Member

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    From what I have learnt here explore following areas
    - dairy free is likely a bad idea, u shud try slowly increasing it up to 1.5-2 litres; gluten free is good
    - T4 only is a bad idea, peat recommends combining it with T3
    - Get the tests done for both the good and bad parts of the cycle for thyroid, estrogen, test, prolactin, calcium, vit D etc to start with; other tests can be added later
    - Intoduce all the components of a peaty diet one by one such as sugar, min 100g protein, fruits, OJ, milk, raw carrot salad, coconut oil, pufa reduction, liver, shellfish, gelatin, mushrooms, cooked veg, coffee, salt to taste, aspirin, niacinamide, ca/P ratio more than 1, stimulating/ creative things, red light, bag breathing etc
     
  3. Dhair

    Dhair Member

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    I would focus on the basics of thyroid function first. Schizophrenia/psychosis has been linked to slow metabolism in the brain.
    Was she taking any medications when she first started having these problems?
    "Therapies that have been successful in treating “schizophrenia” include penicillin, sleep therapy, hyperbaric oxygen, carbon dioxide therapy, thyroid, acetazolamide, lithium and vitamins." - Ray Peat
     
  4. Janelle525

    Janelle525 Member

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  5. OP
    Mad

    Mad Member

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    I think it would be hard to convince my parents to let her try dairy again. She had a pretty bad allergy to casein. I've heard mixed feelings about milk allergies around here...any thoughts? But I agree, I wish she could go back to eating dairy products again.

    Yes, schizophrenia was her original diagnosis and she was put on anti-psychotics, as well. Later, they basically retracted that diagnosis and my parents decided to take her off the anti-psychotics after doing some research and feeling like the medical professionals just wanted to medicate and move on from her case.
    Interesting, we'll have to look into CO2 therapy. I am actually proactively working on CO2 for myself and it has resolved some huge issues for me.
    I don't have too much knowledge about hyperbaric oxygen, acetazolamide, and lithium.

    Actually, that was one of the first things they tried for her. Friends and family did research for us and we did put her on a high dose of niacinamide and vitamin C both. After not seeing many results, my Mom lowered the dose of niacinamide and stopped the vitamin C.
    Since things are looking a little better nowadays, they could give it another try, though.
     
  6. OP
    Mad

    Mad Member

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    Oh and I forgot to answer this.
    Yes she was on birth control, seizure medicine, and the Levoxyl. She is no longer taking the birth control or seizure medicine.
     
  7. dookie

    dookie Member

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    @Mad

    The hormone blood tests are more or less useless. Try to go by symptoms, such as water retention, restlessness, sleep disturbances, etc. - all of these should be low when estrogen is low.

    Try to experiment with different foods, and see how they affect her. What is safe for one person, may be "estrogenic" for another person. Well-cooked starches and meats are safe, and should be started with, then go from there and experiment with dairy and other potentially bowel irritating foods like fruits.

    Coffee is a safe anti-estrogen.

    You can try progesterone, but be aware that it can, in some people, increase estrogenic symptoms, so start with the minimal dose, and stop if there are bad effects. I would try other things first. Sometimes just decreasing estrogen (through diet) is enough to allow progesterone to produce its normal effects.
     
  8. Constatine

    Constatine Member

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    This seems like a brain energy problem. Can you ask her if her head is hurting or if she is especially sensitive to pain? I would recommend tianeptine (as it is remarkably effective at stimulating brain mitochondria and opposing serotonin) as well as a moderate dose of aspirin daily. Her estrogen is still much to high compared to her progesterone levels. Also note that blood levels of estrogen may be about 30 times less than tissue concentrations.
     
  9. Regina

    Regina Member

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    Ah great advice again. I was unaware of those tianeptine properties.
     
  10. Constatine

    Constatine Member

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  11. bloom

    bloom Member

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    Who the hell do you think you are giving advice on treatment, on a condition you know nothing about, from a brief description of a girl with EXTREMELY complex medical problems? This is dangerous stuff. What are your credentials? What is your education? The best thing to do for this woman is to direct her to someone who knows what they're doing, to provide her with some type of information to help. Not give out two-bit treatment advice from an ignorant 'keyboard Dr'. A 'brain energy problem'? You're a moron.
     
  12. bloom

    bloom Member

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    You should look at the Walsh research institute which specialises in treating mental health conditions with 'Advanced Nutrient Therapy'. I have been treated by a Dr trained by the Walsh institute for my bipolar and it has helped immensely.
    I have no affiliation with this organisation.
    Walsh Research Institute
     
  13. bloom

    bloom Member

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    You should also check out menashmedical they are an off-shoot of walsh institute they have Dr's trained all around the world, namely America and Australia. Again specialising in 'Nutrient Therapy' for mental health conditions.
    An Integrative Biomedical Clinic
     
  14. Constatine

    Constatine Member

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    I'm sorry if I offended you or came off as some sort of keyboard Dr who thinks he knows everything. I am a software engineer, not a doctor and I don't claim to be. The op came here for insight, thus it is appropriate I provide my advise. "Brain energy problem" refers to damaged or greatly inhibited brain mitochondria which is a key trait in such mentioned mental conditions. My advise is extremely safe as I would never recommend anything dangerous for those who do not know the risks.
     
  15. Dhair

    Dhair Member

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    Constatine's thinking on this subject is well in line with what Ray Peat has suggested for similar problems. I am not sure what he has suggested that caused you to fly off the handle, but I think it's beyond unnecessary to resort to name calling.
     
  16. bloom

    bloom Member

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    Exactly you're a software engineer, and TIANEPTINE IS A POWERFUL PSYCHOACTIVE DRUG, IT'S A TRICYCLIC ANTIDEPRESSANT. God know's what would happen if you gave that to a women with her condition experiencing psychosis.

    Your advice is not
    it's potentially very dangerous, you're not in a position to recommend such drugs, and you don't know the potential dangers of such recommendations.
     
  17. Constatine

    Constatine Member

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    That is what it is but it is also a harmless drug. There is a single case report that warrants caution (liver damage) but the man was likely taking 100x or 1000x the intentional dose (tianeptine is commonly abused as people take up to 10g at a time where the correct dose is 12.5mg). All other medical literature regarding tianeptine shows that it is remarkably safe. I am also not prescribing a medication. If one is to ask advise on this forum and then choose a particular action I expect them to do their own research and ask an authority they trust (be it a doctor) if such actions warrant caution. You have the right to question me as well as the repercussions of my actions but I wholesomely believe I am helping others thus no further engagement is justified. This forum is about the OP and should not be hijacked with an argument.
     
  18. bloom

    bloom Member

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    This person is experiencing some type of PSYCHOSIS, and you're recommending a powerful PSYCHOACTIVE MEDICATION, I don't think you realise what that means, and how dangerous that is. My fear is that someone is gonna take you up on that advice
     
  19. Constatine

    Constatine Member

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    In this context psychoactive means it effects the mood.
     
  20. bloom

    bloom Member

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    You're recommending giving someone an TCA antidepressant. An old school antidepressant which is used to treat MAJOR DEPRESSION to someone you know basically nothing about whos experiencing psychosis. Does that make sense to you?
     
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