Stress-induced glycolysis is mediated by adrenalin

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Mar 21, 2014.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    A nice study that ties together the hypoglycemic state of shock with increased levels of lactate and pyruvate - all caused by adrenalin. Anti-adrenalin agents (beta "receptor" blockers) successfully ameliorated the condition. I wonder if clonidine would do the same given another study I found, that I will post later on, stating that clonidine protected against shock/endotoxin in liver/gut/brain.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18323749
     
  2. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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    That kind of explains in a nutshell why stress is so damaging. Since following this approach I can definitely pinpoint when stress is the root cause of a problem. Prior to regaining my health this wasn't the case. I always enjoy your informative posts haidut!
     
  3. jyb

    jyb Member

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    On that note, why aren't beta-blocker rarely mentioned on this forum? Wikipedia states that they are sometimes used over the counter by athletics/musicians to suppress anxiety. Maybe they carry too much side effect for a regular use?
     
  4. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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    I believe they have been associated with the onset of CHF. Maybe that is why?
     
  5. aguilaroja

    aguilaroja Member

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    The following reflects my views, which are neither an accurate or full understanding of Dr.Peat's.

    First, adrenalin and biological stress responses are adaptive. One way to view them as short term compromises, as a bridge to, hopefully, long term restoration.

    Second, life needs stimulation, and excitation. However, over-stimulation and exhaustive excitation become dangerous. In an ideal world, I suppose there would be mild, measured, varied stimulation to engage the creative faculties.

    Third, blunting some downstream effects of adrenalin is different from relieving the need for adrenalin in the first place. Restorative measures (thyroid, sugar, CO2, many others) may provide some of the mobilization & circulation functions of adrenalin without shifting into a dominant catabolic mode.

    If "energy and structure are interdependent, at every level", extreme states would evoke or accompany metabolism in hazardous decline. It is interesting how the "stress" signaling is so entwined with the end products of disturbed energy, specifically in this reference.

    In a similar way to thyroid being representative of but not the whole of restorative metabolism, adrenalin (and in their different ways, cortisol, estrogen, histamine, etc.) represents emergency metabolism.

    "Selectively" blocking high adrenalin effects, whether high blood pressure or lactate accumulation, has uses. Orthodox health care relies of some of these bits. But Beta-blockers, other "anti-adrenergic agents" and "conversely" "sympathomimetics" (say, α2 adrenergic agonists like clonidine) have a limited context. They can easily result in symptoms found in states of decline: fatigue, low blood pressure, depression, sleep disturbance, others....Many persons have bothersome symptoms using these medicines, considered to be "successful" for their prescribed indication.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beta_bloc ... se_effects
     
  6. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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    I personally felt terrible on a beta blocker that was prescribed as a 'safe' treatment for anxiety years ago. Later I read about the possible cardiac issue and felt fortunate that I didn't take it long term. :cry:
     
  7. aquaman

    aquaman Member

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    A friend mentioned to me today that he used a Beta Blockers a few years ago to deal with panic attacks, which came on in general as well as during eg public speaking. he said they were remarkably effective about dealing with the adrenaline.

    I have bad sleep and have done for 15 years, many 2-4am wake ups and nightmares.

    I wonder if short term use of Beta Blockers would be helpful without being harmful??
     
  8. tara

    tara Member

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    I don't know whether they would be helpful in your context or not, but I'll report my experience with beta blockers.
    Many years ago I was prescribed was nadolol and later propranolol for migraine prophylaxis; neither was very effective for that. The side effect I remember and hated at the time was that I couldn't exercise. I used to walk on hills, and if I was working hard enough to get my heart rate up towards 135 bpm, I'd start to feel faint. Even less able to keep up with my friends than usual.
     
  9. aquaman

    aquaman Member

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    Yes actually been reading that Beta Blockers are likely to cause insomnia, not help it!

    Seen this from Haidut which may be more relevant:

     
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