Stored PUFA related to serum cholesterol.

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by north, Mar 23, 2014.

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  1. north

    north Member

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    Different types of fat accumulate a bit differently. PUFA seems to be stored more in thigh and butt, while SFA are stored more at abdomen. Peat talks about how cortisol is linked to abdominal fat also, and also mentioned how he lost inches around his waist when starting coconut oil, without losing weight.

    Its also very interesting to see how it relates to cholesterol!
    Abdominal stored PUFA is linked to lower cholesterol, so while trying to increase cholesterol, PUFA around abs might go down. Also, if one has low cholesterol, that person might be likely to have PUFA abdominal fat tissue. I wonder if visceral abdominal fat has higher ratio of PUFA than subcutaneous as well.


    Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Nov;56(11):1081-6.
    Abdominal vs buttock adipose fat: relationships with children’s serum lipid levels.
    Mamalakis G, Kafatos A, Manios Y, Kalogeropoulos N, Andrikopoulos N.
    OBJECTIVE:
    To explore the extent to which the reported unfavorable fatty acid content of abdominal depots in adults is also true for children. In addition, the present study aims to assess the relative importance of abdominal vs buttock adipose tissue fat in the prediction of serum lipid levels in children.
    DESIGN:
    A cross-sectional study of children from the island of Crete.
    SETTING:
    The study was conducted between October 1999 and January 2000 in the Municipality of St Nikolas, Crete.
    SUBJECTS:
    A total of 475 children (aged 11-18) participated in the study. Data were obtained on children’s anthropometry, serum lipids, physical activity and abdominal and buttock adipose tissue fatty acids. In total 138 children (aged 11-16) had complete data in all of the variables studied.
    RESULTS:
    Abdominal depots have elevated proportions of saturated fatty acids (P<0.001) and trans fatty acids (P<0.001), and reduced proportions of monounsaturated (P<0.001) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (P<0.001) in comparison to buttock depots. Buttock adipose tissue monounsaturated fat correlated negatively to serum LDL-C (P<0.05). Abdominal adipose tissue polyunsaturated fat had negative correlations with serum total cholesterol (P<0.05) and LDL-C (P<0.05).Regression analyses indicated that children’s serum total cholesterol (P<0.05) and LDL-C (P<0.05) were inversely related to abdominal adipose tissue polyunsaturated fat. Body mass index was positively related to serum triglycerides (P<0.01) and LDL-C (P<0.01), and negatively to serum HDL-C (P<0.05). Age was negatively related to serum HDL-C (P<0.05).
    CONCLUSIONS: (which seems rather funny in regards to Peats knowledge :cool: )
    It appears that, similar to adults, children’s fatty acid composition of abdominal adipose tissue is less favorable than that of the buttock. Abdominal depots have elevated proportions of saturated fatty acids and reduced proportions of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat in comparison to buttock depots. Moreover, children’s abdominal depots appear to have higher trans fatty acid contents than buttock depots. Children’s adipose polyunsaturated fat, a biomarker of long-term polyunsaturated fatty acid intake, is inversely related to serum total cholesterol and LDL-C. It appears that abdominal adipose tissue fatty acids are more strongly related to serum lipids than buttock adipose tissue fatty acids. This may be attributed to the reported higher lipolysis rates in abdominal as opposed to buttock depots.
    SPONSORSHIP:
    Funding was provided by the Municipality of St Nikolas, Crete, Greece.
     
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