SSRI Drugs Damage Bone By Increasing Adrenaline

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Sep 9, 2016.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    Over the last few years there have been a number of studies linking SSRI use with increased risk of fracture. Subsequent studies found this link to be definitively causal - i.e. SSRI drugs cause those fractures. However, the mechanism of action was officially ascribed to the medical establishment''s favorite category - "unknown". Now this study sheds more light on the mechanism and finds (unsurprisingly) that serotonin crease due to SSRI activates the sympathetic system and it is the increased adrenaline as a result that triggers bone loss. Administering an anti-adrenaline drug (a beta blocker) greatly diminished the bone loss. Aside from the fact that a much safer drug like clonidine could have been used, the study also failed to make the connection between serotonin and cortisol. Cortisol is a much bigger factor in bone and tissue loss then adrenaline and serotonin is perhaps the biggest promoter of cortisol synthesis through the upregulation of ACTH. Adrenaline also promotes cortisol synthesis as part of the sympathetic response. It just so happens that the drug clonidine lowers both adrenaline and cortisol, and as such should be a much better option than the dreaded beta blockers that can leave males impotent and women demented.
    Finally, let's not forget Ray's writings about anti-serotonin drugs being very anabolic to the bone. So, instead of taking an SSRI and then trying to reverse its stimulated bone loss, it's much better to take an anti-serotonin drug as that will not only treat the depression but will also give you bones of steel as well :):

    Long-Term Bone Loss Linked to Antidepressants May Be Ameliorated By Beta Blockers - MedicalResearch.com

    "...When the fluoxetine (SSRI) treatment is extended, however, this beneficial effect is overwhelmed by an action on brain serotonin signaling. Fluoxetine exerts its mood controlling action by enhancing serotonin availability. Unfortunately, this increase ends up neutralizing the serotonin receptor most specifically regulating bone biology. This translates into an increase in sympathetic tone, which in turn impairs bone formation and enhances bone resorption. The net result is bone loss, which is consistent with the increased number of fractures observed in the large clinical studies that analyzed long-term users of SSRIs. Blocking the negative effect of this increase in sympathetic tone on bone cells with a low dose of a commonly used beta-blocker (propranolol) can protect bone mass in mice after a long-term treatment with fluoxetine. This, however, does not appear to alter its effect on behavior."
     
  2. mujuro

    mujuro Member

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    I wonder if the same is true for escitalopram. I have tried many times to come off it, and it is such a Herculean challenge.

    I am also on quetiapine and lithium, so perhaps they mitigate this adrenaline effect. Quetiapine is very good for lowering cortisol, for example.
     
  3. bionicheart

    bionicheart Member

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    @haidut I know this is an old post, but what do you mean by "leaving women demented" from taking beta-blockers? I was prescribed carvedilol for anxiety/prevent tachycardia... doc won't prescribe propranolol because he feels carvedilol is superior, do you think it's safe long term or should I try mirtazapine (I just got a rx for the latter too.) I'm only 27, if that helps. Thanks in advance!
     
  4. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Beta blockers have a known risk of dementia, especially in older patients.
    http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/doi/pdf/10.1176/appi.neuropsych.11100240

    Don't know much about carvedilol but it seems to be another beta blocker. If the doctor is OK with clonidine there is probably no need to go with a beta blocker.
     
  5. Dhair

    Dhair Member

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    Do you think cyproheptadine can lower adrenaline significantly if taken for a few weeks straight? So it would basically do the opposite of what the SSRI does?
     
  6. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Yes, it can lower both cortisol and adrenaline, especially in the higher doses that some people have reported using (4mg - 8mg daily).
     
  7. pimpnamedraypeat

    pimpnamedraypeat Member

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    I didn't really believe in this stuff until I noticed increased bone mass and weighing more and being more "filled in" just by following peat dietary advice and taking some haidut supplements. I used to be such a chicken leg I couldn't go out in shorts. Now I look like I've had a meal in the last couple of days. Vitamin K helped the most, I believe.
     
  8. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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  9. pimpnamedraypeat

    pimpnamedraypeat Member

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  10. Luann

    Luann Member

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    @haidut
    I'm researching beta-blockers for my dad, who has been told that he needs them.
    I saw you mention something called beta receptor blockers in a post. Do you know whether these would be safer for him to take?
    L
     
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