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Somebody Here Ever Got Rid Of Histamine Intolerance?

Motif

Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Messages
2,757
if so - how?

I couldn't find a cure story unfortunately.

I get eczema in the face and dermatitis / hair loss from it.

There's a lot of stuff that helps, like

-Deep breathing often over the day

-neck and scalp massages with a massage machine, vibrating one no idea what's the name for it

-endurance sports help for short time

-uvb lamp for the scalp helps


All that things help for my scalp itching


Any idea whatelse I could do?



Everything that helps blood flow (or lymph flow?) helps with my symptoms.
My back and neck tensions maybe play a role too?
 
Last edited:

fradon

Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2017
Messages
605
eat mahatma brand jasmine rice...this bran tends to cook the best of all the brands i've tried. rice can help seal the gut

no wheat
no corn flour
no oats all these increase zoulin which increases leaky gut

avoid protein as protein increases stomach acid and that increaess histamin

low salt

low fat

try fasting as it can help the intestine repairs itself which also increase DAO which breaks down histamine.

of course when histamine goes back to normal resume your diet.
 

LUH 3417

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Oct 22, 2016
Messages
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I’ve experienced benefits with
-eliminating all wheat and most starches (rice and potatoes occasionally feel fine for now)
-high dose quality vitamin c
-fasting, lower protein, only eating when I’m absolutely hungry
 

Motif

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Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Messages
2,757
But no one really got rid of it. Wtf is this ***t?
 

Motif

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Nov 24, 2017
Messages
2,757
But no one really got rid of it. Wtf is this ***t?
 

Wolf

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Mar 17, 2018
Messages
302
Location
USA
I got rid of my rats with cyproheptadine, high dose l theanine, glycine, and niacinamide. It takes a while for everything to become normalized(mast cells?) but it's made a drastic difference for my rat. I'm currently trying to knock out some mental blocks involving dopamine and serotonin. Here's to being sleepy as all hell again and eating everything in sight.
 

Motif

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Nov 24, 2017
Messages
2,757
Rats = Histamine Intolerance?

How much crypto do you take and does it make you sleepy?
 

Motif

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I got rid of my rats with cyproheptadine, high dose l theanine, glycine, and niacinamide. It takes a while for everything to become normalized(mast cells?) but it's made a drastic difference for my rat. I'm currently trying to knock out some mental blocks involving dopamine and serotonin. Here's to being sleepy as all hell again and eating everything in sight.


And you have to take a lot of stuff to treat the symptoms. I really wonder how to get rid of it
 

Wolf

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Mar 17, 2018
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302
Location
USA
And you have to take a lot of stuff to treat the symptoms. I really wonder how to get rid of it
See study on riboflavin and how rats needed a bunch after damage.
I believe it was a quarter of the standard dose(1mg). Sleepiness goes away in a day or two. I'd rather be sleepy, low cortisol/low histamine/low serotonin and have time to recover than not.
 

zewe

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Jul 8, 2018
Messages
265
May depend on whether you have histamine intolerance from your genetics [about 1% of population, ie me] or if you have acquired it through use of medication. Maybe eating way too may high histamine foods.

I've read that HIT is on the rise. My thoughts on this are because so many are medicated with histamine releasing or histamine raising medications.
 

zewe

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Jul 8, 2018
Messages
265
If you don’t break down histamine properly, you could develop what is called histamine intolerance.

Once formed, histamine is either stored or broken down by an enzyme. Histamine in the central nervous system is broken down primarily by histamine N-methyltransferase (HMT), while histamine in the digestive tract is broken down primarily by diamine oxidase (DAO). Though both enzymes play an important role in histamine break down, the American Society for Clinical Nutrition found that DAO is the main enzyme responsible for breaking down ingested histamine. So if you’re deficient in DAO, you likely have symptoms of histamine intolerance.

If you're an under-methlylator, the HMT enzyme would be predominate. However, many foods and meds block/destroy DAO production. So, you could lack both enzymes.

I'm planning on creating a thread for more on HIT/Mast Cell Activation. I must say now that alot of foods members use and promote would be wrong for people with these illnesses.

For now, here's a general list of meds to avoid. Somewhere I have a more comprehensive list.
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen, aspirin)
  • Antidepressants (Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Zoloft)
  • Immune modulators (Humira, Enbrel, Plaquenil)
  • Antiarrhythmics (propanolol, metaprolol, Cardizem, Norvasc)
  • Antihistamines (Allegra, Zyrtec, Benadryl)
  • Histamine (H2) blockers (Tagamet, Pepcid, Zantac)
Although histamine blockers, a class of acid-reducing drugs, seem like they would help prevent histamine intolerance, these medications can actually deplete DAO levels in your body.
 
L

lollipop

Guest
If you don’t break down histamine properly, you could develop what is called histamine intolerance.

Once formed, histamine is either stored or broken down by an enzyme. Histamine in the central nervous system is broken down primarily by histamine N-methyltransferase (HMT), while histamine in the digestive tract is broken down primarily by diamine oxidase (DAO). Though both enzymes play an important role in histamine break down, the American Society for Clinical Nutrition found that DAO is the main enzyme responsible for breaking down ingested histamine. So if you’re deficient in DAO, you likely have symptoms of histamine intolerance.

If you're an under-methlylator, the HMT enzyme would be predominate. However, many foods and meds block/destroy DAO production. So, you could lack both enzymes.

I'm planning on creating a thread for more on HIT/Mast Cell Activation. I must say now that alot of foods members use and promote would be wrong for people with these illnesses.

For now, here's a general list of meds to avoid. Somewhere I have a more comprehensive list.
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen, aspirin)
  • Antidepressants (Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Zoloft)
  • Immune modulators (Humira, Enbrel, Plaquenil)
  • Antiarrhythmics (propanolol, metaprolol, Cardizem, Norvasc)
  • Antihistamines (Allegra, Zyrtec, Benadryl)
  • Histamine (H2) blockers (Tagamet, Pepcid, Zantac)
Although histamine blockers, a class of acid-reducing drugs, seem like they would help prevent histamine intolerance, these medications can actually deplete DAO levels in your body.
Interesting @zewe thank you for your response. I noticed Aspirin on the list. That could be important to note as many use Aspirin on this forum.
 

xetawaves

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Joined
Jun 2, 2017
Messages
589
If you don’t break down histamine properly, you could develop what is called histamine intolerance.

Once formed, histamine is either stored or broken down by an enzyme. Histamine in the central nervous system is broken down primarily by histamine N-methyltransferase (HMT), while histamine in the digestive tract is broken down primarily by diamine oxidase (DAO). Though both enzymes play an important role in histamine break down, the American Society for Clinical Nutrition found that DAO is the main enzyme responsible for breaking down ingested histamine. So if you’re deficient in DAO, you likely have symptoms of histamine intolerance.

If you're an under-methlylator, the HMT enzyme would be predominate. However, many foods and meds block/destroy DAO production. So, you could lack both enzymes.

I'm planning on creating a thread for more on HIT/Mast Cell Activation. I must say now that alot of foods members use and promote would be wrong for people with these illnesses.

For now, here's a general list of meds to avoid. Somewhere I have a more comprehensive list.
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen, aspirin)
  • Antidepressants (Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Zoloft)
  • Immune modulators (Humira, Enbrel, Plaquenil)
  • Antiarrhythmics (propanolol, metaprolol, Cardizem, Norvasc)
  • Antihistamines (Allegra, Zyrtec, Benadryl)
  • Histamine (H2) blockers (Tagamet, Pepcid, Zantac)
Although histamine blockers, a class of acid-reducing drugs, seem like they would help prevent histamine intolerance, these medications can actually deplete DAO levels in your body.

Would Quercetin be ok to take?

I do think there is a strong connection between Histamine and hair loss, which explains why most people experience scalp itch.

The use of antihistamines both topically and orally have been known to help with hair loss. I feel like Quercetin does help reduce shedding for me.
 
Last edited:

zewe

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Jul 8, 2018
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265
Yes, quercitin is one supplement that is commonly used for HIT.
 

xetawaves

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Jun 2, 2017
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Good to know it’s ok to take cause I’ve taken a lot of it over the past year lol guess I should chill out with the aspirin though
 

Motif

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Nov 24, 2017
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I keep histamine as low as possible and still got issues
 

zewe

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Jul 8, 2018
Messages
265
Off the top of my head, opiates would raise histamine levels, too.
 

zewe

Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2018
Messages
265
I keep histamine as low as possible and still got issues
Honestly, Motif, a gazillion things can trigger me. Like humidity, heat, cold, emotions like anger, over exertion [and I don't need much],
resulting fatigue can trigger me, noise, light......To name a few, besides food and meds.
 

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