So,what Is The Final Conlcusion On Cellulose Filler?

Discussion in 'Supplements' started by freal, Sep 3, 2013.

  1. freal

    freal Member

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    If it say only cellulose, not mycrocristalline or methyl or other type. I see toxinless.com does not qualify cellulose as bad??

    Is it bad, good or acceptable(neutral). What is Ray Peat take on it?
     
  2. 4peatssake

    4peatssake Member

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    I'm not exactly sure what his take is on it as an excipient but he does consider it a "safe" fiber.

     
  3. Dan Wich

    Dan Wich Member

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    As with 4peatssake, I'm not sure on his opinion on it as an excipient. So I've ignored it on Toxinless for the time being.
     
  4. OP
    freal

    freal Member

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    Ray Peat says plain celullose as a filler is O.k.. Also the starch fillers, like potato or rice flour are also o.k. since the ammount in capsule is very small.
     
  5. JanP

    JanP Member

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    "Its presence in food, like that of the polyester imitation fat, microcrystalline cellulose, and many other polymers used to stabilize emulsions or to increase smoothness, is often justified by the doctrine that these molecules are too large to be absorbed. There are two points that are deliberately ignored by the food-safety regulators, 1) these materials can interact dangerously with intestinal bacteria, and 2) they can be absorbed, in the process called "persorption."" - Ray Peat, PhD

    Pathologe 1993 Sep;14(5):247-252 [Persorption of microparticles]. Volkheimer G “Solid, hard microparticles, such as starch granules, pollen, cellulose particles, fibres and crystals, whose diameters are well into the micrometre range, are incorporated regularly and in considerable numbers from the digestive tract. Motor factors play an important part in the paracellular penetration of the epithelial cell layer. From the subepithelial region the microparticles are transported away via lymph and blood vessels. They can be detected in body fluids using simple methods: only a few minutes after oral administration they can be found in the peripheral blood-stream. We observed their passage into urine, bile, cerebrospinal fluid, the alveolar lumen, the peritoneal cavity, breast milk, and transplacentally into the fetal blood-stream. Since persorbed microparticles can embolise small vessels, this touches on microangiological problems, especially in the region of the CNS. The long-term deposit of embolising microparticles which consist of potential allergens or contaminants, or which are carriers of contaminants, is of immunological and environmental-technical importance. Numerous ready-made foodstuffs contain large quantities of microparticles capable of persorption.”
     
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