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Severe Copper Deficiency By Daily Oyster Consumption (PubMed Case-Study)

I'm.No.One

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My body just straight up rejects oysters as of the last year.

If I eat them, in any form, I get a kidney infection. It's the oddest thing. Happens with clams too. So no bivalves for me.

Eating as many as that lady did would probably kill me?
 

Cloudhands

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right but fats oxidize when cooked at high temperatures as well, for example this is why ray advises against cooking with olive oil.
 
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My body just straight up rejects oysters as of the last year.

If I eat them, in any form, I get a kidney infection. It's the oddest thing. Happens with clams too. So no bivalves for me.

Eating as many as that lady did would probably kill me?
I just don't even trust oysters nowadays, with all the weird bacterias and toxic algaes. Heat doesn't even kill some of them. That is weird though that they would give you kidney problems. I am gonna have look into that one.
 

aniciete

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I just don't even trust oysters nowadays, with all the weird bacterias and toxic algaes. Heat doesn't even kill some of them. That is weird though that they would give you kidney problems. I am gonna have look into that one.
I no longer consume any kind of seafood. Back when I lived on the coast, the old-school local fishermen all said seafood was no longer safe for consumption and I trust their judgement.
I still stand by this. I never feel good after seafood and the thought of eating it is now repelling.
 
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ME:
"Good evening Dr. Peat!

Besides the obvious word fresh, can you please clarify how cooking fresh liver quickly is different from drying the liver out, which you have said becomes toxic? Is it from the air or heat?"

RAY PEAT:
"Quickly cooked (at high temperature) salmon has only a small fraction of the free radicals in poached salmon. The combination of time and oxygen is more important than temperature. Dehydration creates much more oxidation than quick cooking."
 

Cloudhands

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ME:
"Good evening Dr. Peat!

Besides the obvious word fresh, can you please clarify how cooking fresh liver quickly is different from drying the liver out, which you have said becomes toxic? Is it from the air or heat?"

RAY PEAT:
"Quickly cooked (at high temperature) salmon has only a small fraction of the free radicals in poached salmon. The combination of time and oxygen is more important than temperature. Dehydration creates much more oxidation than quick cooking."
makes sense. i seriously need to get better at flash cooking my liver. ill make a pate next time.
 
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makes sense. i seriously need to get better at flash cooking my liver. ill make a pate next time.
I buy braunschweiger and fry it up and make tacos or tostadas with it. I mix it half and half for the family for ground beef tacos, meatballs, meatloaf or stroganoff and they love it. They didn't know I was sneaking it in for a long time. The braunschweiger I buy (linked below) is a 40% liver to 60% beef blend. Before that I would soak my liver in milk and cut it up tiny pieces, fry it and season with taco seasoning for tacos, and it was pretty good too.

 

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youngsinatra

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I personally don‘t think red meat is problematic. Grass-fed beef is probably the least problematic food in our current polluted and deranged food system.

If one consumes coffee, fiber, lactoferrin and gets regular blood donations, then this all should take care with any excess of iron in my opinion.

A friend of mine lowered his ferritin from the 500s down to 70 in 6 months, with 3 blood donations, lactoferrin, soluble fiber and still eating at least a pound of ground beef a day.
 
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Grapelander

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This kind of thing takes a long time to develop. 45 oysters a day for 15 years. People with OCD usually have screwed up mineral profiles.
The actual relevance to today is that we have people taking zinc ionophores (quercetin/ECGC/HCQ) to prevent/reduce viral infections.
This could run the copper out faster. Chlorophyllin (Sodium Copper) sold in store has copper that is absorbed by the body.

Zinc ionophore activity of quercetin and epigallocatechin-gallate: from Hepa 1-6 cells to a liposome model

Chlorophyllin: a potent antimutagen against environmental and dietary complex mixtures

Chlorophyllin supplementation modulates hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in liver of streptozotocin-administered mice

Medical Uses of Copper in Antiquity

Metal Power - The Soul Life of Planets

 

aniciete

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I personally don‘t think red meat is problematic. Grass-fed beef is probably the least problematic food in our current polluted and deranged food system.

If one consumes coffee, fiber, lactoferrin and gets regular blood donations, then this all should take care with any excess of iron in my opinion.

A friend of mine lowered his ferritin from the 500s down to 70 in 6 months, with 3 blood donations, lactoferrin, soluble fiber and still eating at least a pound of ground beef a day.
What do you think is the proper zinc to copper ratio when consuming lots of beef? I suspect my histamine problems have been the result of a lack of copper.
 

I'm.No.One

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I just don't even trust oysters nowadays, with all the weird bacterias and toxic algaes. Heat doesn't even kill some of them. That is weird though that they would give you kidney problems. I am gonna have look into that one.
Yeah it's the craziest thing. I thought it might be an indicator of kidney function issues, ran a panel & they're doing awesome. So I'm just gana listen to my body, clams did the same thing though so it might be an odd allergy that results in a kidney infection?
 
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Yeah it's the craziest thing. I thought it might be an indicator of kidney function issues, ran a panel & they're doing awesome. So I'm just gana listen to my body, clams did the same thing though so it might be an odd allergy that results in a kidney infection?
I have no idea.
 

xeliex

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ME:
"Good evening Dr. Peat!

Besides the obvious word fresh, can you please clarify how cooking fresh liver quickly is different from drying the liver out, which you have said becomes toxic? Is it from the air or heat?"

RAY PEAT:
"Quickly cooked (at high temperature) salmon has only a small fraction of the free radicals in poached salmon. The combination of time and oxygen is more important than temperature. Dehydration creates much more oxidation than quick cooking."
Excellent. Thanks for doing this.

Time and oxygen combo seems more detrimental than high heat.

Good quality liver pills say the they are freeze dried.

I looked up what freeze drying is:

"Freeze drying, also known as lyophilisation or cryodesiccation, is a low temperature dehydration process that involves freezing the product, lowering pressure, then removing the ice by sublimation. This is in contrast to dehydration by most conventional methods that evaporate water using heat."

I wonder if Ray was aware that that. It'll be great if you can clarify with him.
 

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