Schooling System Is Designed To Destroy Children

Discussion in 'Society' started by Hugh Johnson, Jun 8, 2017.

  1. Hugh Johnson

    Hugh Johnson Member

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    I’ve taught public school for 26 years but I just can’t do it anymore. For years I asked the local school board and superintendent to let me teach a curriculum that doesn’t hurt kids, but they had other fish to fry. So I’m going to quit, I think.

    I’ve come slowly to understand what it is I really teach: A curriculum of confusion, class position, arbitrary justice, vulgarity, rudeness, disrespect for privacy, indifference to quality, and utter dependency. I teach how to fit into a world I don’t want to live in.

    I just can’t do it anymore. I can’t train children to wait to be told what to do; I can’t train people to drop what they are doing when a bell sounds; I can’t persuade children to feel some justice in their class placement when there isn’t any, and I can’t persuade children to believe teachers have valuable secrets they can acquire by becoming our disciples. That isn’t true.

    Government schooling is the most radical adventure in history. It kills the family by monopolizing the best times of childhood and by teaching disrespect for home and parents.

    An exaggeration? Hardly. Parents aren’t meant to participate in our form of schooling, rhetoric to the contrary. My orders as schoolteacher are to make children fit an animal training system, not to help each find his or her personal path.

    The whole blueprint of school procedure is Egyptian, not Greek or Roman. It grows from the faith that human value is a scarce thing, represented symbolically by the narrow peak of a pyramid.

    That idea passed into American history through the Puritans. It found its “scientific” presentation in the bell curve, along which talent supposedly apportions itself by some Iron Law of biology.

    It’s a religious idea and school is its church. New York City hires me to be a priest. I offer rituals to keep heresy at bay. I provide documentation to justify the heavenly pyramid.

    Socrates foresaw that if teaching became a formal profession something like this would happen. Professional interest is best served by making what is easy to do seem hard; by subordinating laity to priesthood. School has become too vital a jobs project, contract-giver and protector of the social order to allow itself to be “re-formed.” It has political allies to guard its marches.

    That’s why reforms come and go-without changing much. Even reformers can’t imagine school much different.



    David learns to read at age four; Rachel, at age nine: In normal development, when both are 13, you can’t tell which one learned first — the five-year spread means nothing at all. But in school I will label Rachel “learning disabled” and slow David down a bit, too.

    For a paycheck, I adjust David to depend on me to tell him when to go and stop. He won’t outgrow that dependency. I identify Rachel as discount merchandise, “special education.” After a few months she’ll be locked into her place forever.

    In 26 years of teaching rich kids and poor, I almost never met a “learning disabled” child; hardly ever met a “gifted and talented” one, either. Like all school categories, these are sacred myths, created by the human imagination. They derive from questionable values we never examine because they preserve the temple of schooling.

    That’s the secret behind short-answer tests, bells, uniform time blocks, age grading, standardization, and all the rest of the school religion punishing our nation.

    There isn’t a right way to become educated; there are as many ways as fingerprints. We don’t need state-certified teachers to make education happen–that probably guarantees it won’t.

    How much more evidence is necessary? Good schools don’t need more money or a longer year; they need real free-market choices, variety that speaks to every need and runs risks. We don’t need a national curriculum, or national testing either. Both initiatives arise from ignorance of how people learn, or deliberate indifference to it.

    I can’t teach this way any longer. If you hear of a job where I don’t have to hurt kids to make a living, let me know. Come fall I’ll be looking for work, I think.

    John Taylor Gatto wrote this article for The Wall Street Journal, July 25th, 1991. Gatto was a New York State Teacher of the Year. An advocate for school reform, Gatto’s books includeDumbing Us Down: The Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling, the Underground History of American Education and Weapons of Mass Instruction.
     
  2. Marg

    Marg Member

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    Another excellent source - whistleblower Charlotte Iserbyt:

    www.deliberatedumbingdown.com

    Charlotte Iserbyt is a freelace writer. She served as a Senior Policy Advisor in the Office of Educational Research and Improvement for the US Dept. Of Education during the Regan Administration. Her webste provides lots of documentation.

    -------------------------------------------------------------

    Wikipedia:

    She is known for writing the book The Deliberate Dumbing Down of America. The book reveals that changes gradually brought into the American public education system work to eliminate the influences of a child's parents (religion, morals, national patriotism), and mold the child into a member of the proletariat in preparation for a socialist-collectivist world of the future. She says that these changes originated from plans formulated primarily by the Andrew CarnegieFoundation for the Advancement of Education and Rockefeller General Education Board, and details the psychological methods used to implement and effect the changes.
     
  3. Rafe

    Rafe Member

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    @Hugh Johnson

    Exactly.

    You might like this. Illich does a great job of demonstrating the externalities that make public education in the liberal democratic state unsustainable & irrational. It was first published in 1970, so he's forming his thoughts about this around the same time that RP is doing his graduate work. He makes the nonsense clear. I'm interpreting your indignation at seeing what role you've had, and the imperative to quit it as a breath of fresh air. Not a cliche, but really. I suspect there is very good life after breaking through some of the compromises we make with society just to live.

    Following. I'd like to hear about your progress with your decisions on this. [Waldorf Schools might be an alternative.]

    https://www.amazon.com/Deschooling-Society-Open-Forum-S/dp/0714508799
     
  4. Liubo

    Liubo Member

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    This is a great post.
    I was homeschooled and, among a number of non-school books in our home, there were a few that stand out. "David learns to read at age four; Rachel, at age nine: In normal development, when both are 13, you can’t tell which one learned first — the five-year spread means nothing at all. But in school I will label Rachel “learning disabled” and slow David down a bit, too." This quote, it was in a book we had.
    We had The socialization Trap, which I learn to be more true over the years.
     
  5. lampofred

    lampofred Member

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    You quitting is just going to make it worse. Let them have at least one good teacher?
     
  6. DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    Any investment of energy in these institutions keeps them functioning, where they reiterate destructive ideologies that trap more youths in feelings of helplessness and desperation because they lack skills in the real world, yet they must undergo years of training and indoctrination during the crucial stages of learning and development. Mandatory training without skills; it's really a fantastic deal.

    Retreat to Rapture. Take your skills and humanity with you.
     
  7. Queequeg

    Queequeg Member

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    +1 She takes John Taylor Gatto to the next level
     
  8. OP
    Hugh Johnson

    Hugh Johnson Member

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    Mate, that is an article I copied. Look at the bottom. I'm not even american.
     
  9. BigYellowLemon

    BigYellowLemon Member

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    Agree completely.
     
  10. Dessert_All_Day

    Dessert_All_Day Member

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    The public school system is designed to be a net benefit for society, not for every single individual equally. And no one is forcing parents to send their children to public schools.
     
  11. bloom

    bloom Member

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  12. Xisca

    Xisca Member

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    If you can edit, make it clear from the start, unless you want to check who reads you all to the end! ;)

    I think it enhances that not only institutions are the culprit!
    Up to what point it is designed to destroy children? I think it is co-designed with all of us, or most.

    I had the same talk about doctors, yesterday with a friend, and doctors just cannot do their job in the public medicine here, both from the little time they are given to see each person, but also because of the expectation from the persons to get a quick fix WITHOUT doing any effort from their side.

    But for sure, many parents who both work cannot but let their children go to scholl, public school if they cannot afford other. Forced without being forced, uncouscious for some of them, and feeling powerless for others... So the problem is becoming as complicated as coming out of the circle of having to eat AND starve bad bugs!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  13. DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    Enforcing Truancy Laws - FindLaw

    "Many states also hold parents accountable for their children's truancy, and Arizona was the first state to implement such laws. The rationale behind this movement was to coerce parents into taking an active role in their children's education and for all parties to take truancy laws and school attendance seriously. In Virginia, parents can be fined and jailed for failure to adequately supervise school-aged children, which includes making sure they are attending school. In Pennsylvania, parents can also be fined and jailed if they have not taken reasonable steps to ensure their child is attending school. In Texas and many other states, similar laws have recently been passed."
     
  14. Rafe

    Rafe Member

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    Apologies. Misunderstood who was saying what. Maybe some quotation marks?
    Still agree.
     
  15. Dessert_All_Day

    Dessert_All_Day Member

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    Homeschooling is a thing. And no one is forced to live in the states (or countries) which enforce such policies.
     
  16. Queequeg

    Queequeg Member

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    I think you should ask yourself what type of "society" they are trying to "benefit." Different societies need different types of educational systems. If you read the foundational works of modern education, which Charlotte Iserbyt provides an excellent summary, you will see that they are very open in their desired end goal of worldwide scientific socialism; where all decisions are made by experts and not by citizens. A thinking questioning citizen may be desirable for a republic but it is very dangerous to a scientific dictatorship.
     
  17. Tenacity

    Tenacity Member

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    Plato wrote in Republic that education should be designed in such a way that it keeps society and politics stable, unified and unchanging. I think that elucidates what @Queequeg means by "different societies need different types of educational system". The educational system we have today is likely a reflection of what kind of government our superiors would like to lead.
     
  18. Queequeg

    Queequeg Member

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    Ironically, Plato's ideal government of the philosopher king and a dumbed down citizenry is exactly what we are headed towards.
     
  19. Tenacity

    Tenacity Member

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    Perhaps we can find parallels between Plato's proposed education system and our own, in that case.
     
  20. Queequeg

    Queequeg Member

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    Its been a while since I read the Republic but I remember being shocked by the parallels.
    some that come to mind
    A dumbed working class that is taught whatever is needed to keep them in line i.e. the Noble Lie
    A military class that is raised apart from the workers to maintain order
    A ruling elite of philosopher kings who think it is their right to make all decisions for society
    As far as education, the state completely takes over the raising of all of the youth. Actually there are no families and nobody actually knows who their parents are. This was also the case in Brave New World where everyone was born in a lab. I doubt the growing increase in infertility is an accident.
     
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