RP Email Advice Comment: Viruses

Discussion in 'Email Advice' started by EndAllDisease, Feb 19, 2016.

  1. Mary Lyn

    Mary Lyn Member

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    Thanks but it does not answer my question. If the exosomes are being mistaken for so called viruses, why would they enter cells as presumably viruses can be seen doing?
     
  2. SOMO

    SOMO Member

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    Why do exosomes enter other cells cells? Probably because they are cells, albeit partial cells, and are made of similar materials.
    Have you ever seen 2 or more drops of oil in a cup of water coalesce and become 1 big drop? Or how about soap suds combining with other soap suds to make a larger bubble?
    Electrochemical reasons, polarity and water-solubility also play a part.


    Some viruses may be exosomes and some viruses may just be viruses, but the real issue is that some viruses have never been isolated properly only through indirect markers. And in a few cases, when supposed virions/viral particles were photographed, they were likely exosomes.

    [​IMG]
    There is overlap between the sizes of the exosomes, viruses and microvesicles and because of this, it is possible someone may mistake one for the other two. I think in some instances, exosomes may be mistaken for viruses.

     
  3. Mary Lyn

    Mary Lyn Member

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    SOMO that was very helpful indeed.

    "some viruses have never been isolated properly only through indirect markers."

    So it is not so black and white.
     
  4. RealNeat

    RealNeat Member

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    Hmm well how do we suppose these monkies were infected with this non virus? Macaque monkeys can't become reinfected with COVID-19, small study suggests. | Live Science
     
  5. SOMO

    SOMO Member

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    It's an interesting article, but I see some issues right off the bat soup.

    First, let me say that I do believe it is possible there is some strain of highly contagious pathogen that is affecting many people and if left untreated, in people with poor health, can become fatal.

    I'm not sure what they infected the throats of these monkeys with, but it definitely wasn't pure Covid19 virus. It was likely RNA-presumed-to-come-from-Covid19 but could have come from another source - another coronavirus, bacteria or fungi.


    1. As far as I know (I could be wrong), no scientist has properly isolated Covid19 yet according to Koch's Postulates.
    All attempts to isolate Covid19 use indirect markers, and the test that purports to show Covid19 uses indirect markers. You can show someone has Syphilis because you can isolate the bacteria in a petri dish, but this hasn't been done for Covid 19.

    One of the first groups to study corona in India (India is less prone to media mass hysteria than America or Europe) said this:
    2. The PCR/Viral Load test uses an indirect marker - RNA that-is-presumed-to-come-from-a-virus.
    You CAN show that a monkey was infected with some type of RNA, but you can not say that RNA is definitely from Covid19 because nobody has isolated Covid19 and sequenced it's entire genome.

    3. I'm going to give the benefit of the doubt to the scientists and say hypothetically that the RNA they use IS 100% definitely from Covid19. It still doesn't prove infection. Kary Mullis who invented the PCR/VL test, says you can not use the test for Quantification or to diagnose a virus.
    The PCR test as it is used nowadays, does not measure virus as YES/NO, it measures HIGH/LOW, even though the inventor of the test says it is not a quantative tool.
    The point at which someone is diagnosed Positive is an arbitrary number that the lab decides. Someone can have Covid19 RNA in their blood and be considered Negative, if the number of RNA is below the cutoff.
    Did you know that the PCR test, as it's used to diagnose viruses has a numerical "Cutoff" after which you become "Positive".
    Someone that has 5000 RNAs, for example, is considered "Negative", but someone that has 5001 RNAs is considered "Indeterminate" and someone that has 6000 RNAs is considered "Positive."


    4. The other test used for diagnosis, the Antibody test, is a joke because antibodies cross-react with many antigens. Antibodies are said to be "promiscuous."
    Because antibody tests are unreliable, you can not diagnose someone (or a monkey) with Covid19 based off the antibody test.
    ---


    Sorry for the extremely long post, but I wanted to point out all the glaring issues with the testing, diagnosis and quantification of Covid19, because they are countless.
     
  6. sugarbabe

    sugarbabe Member

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    Very nice post!! I bookmarked it for future reference when debating viral testing.
     
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