• @Blossom Is A Blessing To This Community, Let Us Be A Blessing To Her
    Click Here For More Information
  • Due to excessive bot signups along with nefarious actors we are limiting forum registration. Keep checking back for the register link to appear. Please do not send emails or have someone post to the forum asking for a signup link. Until the current climate changes we do not see a change of this policy. To join the forum you must have a compelling reason. Letting us know what skills/knowledge you will bring to the community along with the intent of your stay here will help in getting you approved.

Ray Peat on oatmeal and oat bran

Logan-

Member
Thread starter
Joined
May 26, 2018
Messages
981
He is now lowering his Protein to about 50 grams daily, and eating oatmeal for breakfast. Oat bran has been his intestinal cleaner for a while now.

 

Logan-

Member
Thread starter
Joined
May 26, 2018
Messages
981
He also used to not like mushrooms but when the research showed it was possible to remove toxins with long cooking, he changed his thinking. Oat bran + cascara + carrot salad + mushroom cream soup is guaranteed to clean bowels thoroughly.


 

Logan-

Member
Thread starter
Joined
May 26, 2018
Messages
981
Ray continues to enlighten us with new information. Lately oatmeal and oat bran, now scalp massage.
 

Dolomite

Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2017
Messages
628
 

Logan-

Member
Thread starter
Joined
May 26, 2018
Messages
981
 

Logan-

Member
Thread starter
Joined
May 26, 2018
Messages
981

Gluten Cross-Reactivity Chart​


This is one of the figures from the paper. I’ve added a green line to show you the level of the negative control, meaning below which there is no gluten-cross reactivity. And, I’ve highlighted all the positives in yellow, meaning those foods are potentially cross-reactive with gluten antibodies.CBE5BCED-8196-4E3D-BEFF-CC5B67EB6D07.jpeg


 
Last edited:

Logan-

Member
Thread starter
Joined
May 26, 2018
Messages
981

What are Prolamins?​

Prolamins are a toxic lectin that are abundant in grains, legumes, and pseudo-grains (more specifically, in the seed of the plant, which includes wheat, oats, barley, quinoa, rice, peanuts, and soy).

Examples of prolamins are gliadin in wheat (gliadin is the protein fraction of gluten), hordein in barley, secalin in rye, zein in corn, kafirin in sorghum, orzenin in rice, and avenin in oats.

Studies show that prolamins in quinoa, corn, and oats can cause damage to the gut and stimulate the immune system in celiac sufferers in a manner completely analogous to gliadin. Clearly, this means that those with celiac disease should never consume these other grains or pseudo-grains. But also, because of the understanding that gluten increases intestinal permeability, which is strongly linked with all chronic illness, anyone struggling with a diagnosis should probably avoid the consumption of grains, pseudo-grains, and legumes.

 

Jessie

Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2020
Messages
713
Wheat bran is better is you're looking for something that won't ferment in your gut. The INsoluble fiber is what cleans bacteria out of your intestines and moves it down the line for excretion.

In an old newsletter Ray cited that wheat bran was the only bran that didn't increase intestinal cancer risk.

It's interesting to see he's changed his mind on oat bran. I guess it must be a convenience thing for him, easy to get where he lives.
 

Jessie

Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2020
Messages
713
I personally try to keep soluble fiber to a minimum. I don't see much use in something that's going to slow transit time.
 

mrchibbs

Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2017
Messages
3,106
Location
Atlantis
Ray has talked about oat bran for years, going back to his 70s books.

I think he's returned to it mostly for enjoyment and taste.

I've never been a huge fan of oatmeal, but I must say I absolutely love oat bran these past couple of months. A little butter, sugar (or maple syrup), pinch of salt, cinammon, and 1/4 cup of oat bran with milk is delicious.
 

sugarbabe

Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2012
Messages
4,832
Location
USA
I personally try to keep soluble fiber to a minimum. I don't see much use in something that's going to slow transit time.
It's only soluble fiber that binds bile. So if you have very little of it 95% of your bile just recirculates. That's why Ray always recommended the carrot. Though cooked carrots bind bile better. Steamed veggies in general are good as well.
 

supercoolguy

Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2015
Messages
304
Ray has talked about oat bran for years, going back to his 70s books.

I think he's returned to it mostly for enjoyment and taste.

I've never been a huge fan of oatmeal, but I must say I absolutely love oat bran these past couple of months. A little butter, sugar (or maple syrup), pinch of salt, cinammon, and 1/4 cup of oat bran with milk is delicious.
For some reason, Oat Bran (cooked) was like plaster in my gut. Well Cooked/Hydrated, Honey, LF Milk. Didn't seem to matter.
Looked around for days every week, then realized! The horse barn was ME, right in my own sinus. Goodbye Oat Bran.
 

mrchibbs

Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2017
Messages
3,106
Location
Atlantis
For some reason, Oat Bran (cooked) was like plaster in my gut. Well Cooked/Hydrated, Honey, LF Milk. Didn't seem to matter.
Looked around for days every week, then realized! The horse barn was ME, right in my own sinus. Goodbye Oat Bran.

Yeah, one thing I've discovered over the years applying some of Ray's ideas is the remarkable individual differences in physiology.

From a purely genetic perspective you wouldn't think humans could be so different, but we are, foods affect people differently. Part of that has to do with the microbiome, which varies significantly from one person to the other.

I do very well on oat bran, much better than oat meal and I've found it a very pleasant breakfast. It's ok if you don't, it's about finding what works for you.
 
Joined
Jul 11, 2020
Messages
148
Isn't Oat Bran super high in phosphorus? Wouldn't that considerably throw off the calcium/phosphorus ratio?
 

daphne134

Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2014
Messages
96
Isn't Oat Bran super high in phosphorus? Wouldn't that considerably throw off the calcium/phosphorus ratio?
Huh, it cooks up so nicely with half water, half milk. I wonder if that's because of the phosphorus and calcium binding.

It seems to be helping my digestive capacity.
 
Joined
Jul 11, 2020
Messages
148
Huh, it cooks up so nicely with half water, half milk. I wonder if that's because of the phosphorus and calcium binding.

It seems to be helping my digestive capacity.
Seems more likely that is to do with resistant starch and their role in creating SCFA's than anything to do with mineral content or ratios

Either way, i thought of all things bran would be considered "anti-peat" by most here and especially wouldn't be favoured by Peat himself based on his own research and what he's been talking about for years..i know he doesn't advocate for any specific foods or a diet of any description, but i do find his inclusion of oat bran to his own diet to be a bit ironic lol
 

daphne134

Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2014
Messages
96
.i know he doesn't advocate for any specific foods or a diet of any description, but i do find his inclusion of oat bran to his own diet to be a bit ironic lol
Maybe this old saying applies ... Oat bran is the exception that proves the rule?

(or maybe I'm just finding reasons to like it 'cause I do, lol)
 

Similar threads

Top