Ray Peat On Carbon Dioxide

Discussion in 'Ray Peat Quotes' started by md_a, Apr 17, 2020.

  1. md_a

    md_a Member

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    Carbon dioxide protects nerves and muscles against excessive excitation. It inhibits lactic acid formation, and lipid peroxidation (measured in the blood) can be completely suppressed by a pC02 of about 90 mm, which isn't high enough to produce acidosis.
    Hospital respirators are normally set to hyperventilate patients, and the use of supplemental oxygen tends to make hyperventilation worse, making breathing and circulation more difficult.
    Carbogen, 95% oxygen with 5% carbon dioxide, is available, but is seldom used. Hyperbaric oxygen is both safer and more effective when carbon dioxide is added, but the amount of carbon dioxide needed varies with the pressure. More people would recover from brain and spinal cord injuries if physicians understood nerve and respiratory physiology.
    One of the most commonly recognized features of estrogen excess is leakiness of the capillaries. Simple hyperventilation is enough to cause capillaries to leak, and this involves many related events, including decreased carbon dioxide, and increased release of serotonin.
    Edema, fibrosis, and inflammation (resulting from capillary leakage) contribute to a change in cellular energy production, and along with the actions of serotonin and other regulatory substances released during the alkalosis of stress, cells are stimulated to multiply.
    The excitation of cells produced by a deficiency of carbon dioxide increases their need for energy. If their energy production is suppressed (as by estrogen, serotonin, and edema), they will either adapt or die.- Ray Peat

    Although Yandell Henderson had already, in 1928, explained the need for carbon dioxide to be used with oxygen for resuscitating infants or adults, medical researchers and hospital workers could never accept the idea, probably because of a fundamental misunderstanding of the Henderson- Hasselbalch equation. Animal experiments show that supplemental oxygen, without carbon dioxide, causes vasoconstriction, reducing the tissues' supply of glucose as well as oxygen. In combination with too much light, especially blue light, it damages the retina. At hyperbaric pressure, oxygen causes seizures, as well as damage to the lungs and other tissues. - Ray Peat

    Carbon dioxide protects nerves and muscles against excessive excitation. It inhibits lactic acid formation, and lipid peroxidation (measured in the blood) can be completely suppressed by a pC02 of about 90 mm, which isn't high enough to produce acidosis.
    Hospital respirators are normally set to hyperventilate patients, and the use of supplemental oxygen tends to make hyperventilation worse, making breathing and circulation more difficult.
    Carbogen, 95% oxygen with 5% carbon dioxide, is available, but is seldom used. Hyperbaric oxygen is both safer and more effective when carbon dioxide is added, but the amount of carbon dioxide needed varies with the pressure. More people would recover from brain and spinal cord injuries if physicians understood nerve and respiratory physiology.
    One of the most commonly recognized features of estrogen excess is leakiness of the capillaries. Simple hyperventilation is enough to cause capillaries to leak, and this involves many related events, including decreased carbon dioxide, and increased release of serotonin.
    Edema, fibrosis, and inflammation (resulting from capillary leakage) contribute to a change in cellular energy production, and along with the actions of serotonin and other regulatory substances released during the alkalosis of stress, cells are stimulated to multiply.
    The excitation of cells produced by a deficiency of carbon dioxide increases their need for energy. If their energy production is suppressed (as by estrogen, serotonin, and edema), they will either adapt or die.- Ray Peat

    The blood platelets that become incontinent and leak serotonin in the absence of carbon dioxide are undergoing the same structural stresses experienced by endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, mast cells and all other cells when carbon dioxide is depleted. Although it has been about 70 years since Yandell Henderson made it clear that supplemental oxygen should be combined with carbon dioxide, mechanical ventilation in hospitals is still causing lung injury resulting from hyperventilation, i.e., the absence of carbon dioxide.- Ray Peat
     
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