pufa in bone broth? (non grass fed)

Discussion in 'Broth, Stocks' started by jaakkima, Oct 31, 2013.

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  1. jaakkima

    jaakkima Member

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    Hi there. I have found, after eliminating a number of supplements, coffee, fruits etc, a diet that seems to be working for my gut issues. I was having problems with great lakes gelatin tio, so I started making bone broth and eating it with every snack/meal. This id the first thing that seems to be working. I cannot afford to buy so much good grass fed bones though (esp when I can get these for free), so I really don't know how much fat I'm consuming and how much of it is pufa. Any advice? I don't think I have any other consistent pufa intake now but I'm eating plenty of broth.
     
  2. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Cool the broth in the fridge then skim all the fat off the top when it hardens.
     
  3. OP
    jaakkima

    jaakkima Member

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    I think the fat might be mixed in because I put so many bones in to get enough gelatin.

    I just saw that lead contamination thread. That is frustrating.
     
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    jaakkima

    jaakkima Member

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    I've gotten a headache today, which is very unusual for me, especially with onset in the day. The only new thing is the bone broth. Any ideas if something in it might cause a headache?
     
  5. Bruv

    Bruv Member

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    How does using lots of bones mix the fat in?
     
  6. harnessedinslums

    harnessedinslums Member

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    Pretty much all the fat should float to the surface. If it's from ruminants, the fat will form a hard cover that's very easy to remove. The broth often looks a bit cloudy, so there might be some emulsified fat in it, but not much, and it could just as easily be from protein or minerals. Are you sensitive to MSG? Bone broth is often rich in free glutamates that can bother some people, so sometimes it's better to simmer the meat and bones for just a few hours instead of a day or more... that's a long shot, but I'm just throwing that out there. Also, simmering it too long or too hot can prevent it from gelling properly.
     
  7. OP
    jaakkima

    jaakkima Member

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    The pot was very filled with bones so it seemed like the fat was mixed in more because I didn't get the fat cover on the surface, which I normally have seen.

    In other news, I've returned to trying Great Lakes, and I think my body is okay with it. I wonder if I was reacting to something else. It hasn't always been easy to tell what is problematic, but I am doing pretty okay on Great Lakes the past couple days.
     
  8. Bruv

    Bruv Member

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    There probably wasn't as much fat on the bones as the previous times you have made it or you cooked it for a shorter time. Stock or bone broth or whatever you want to call it is mostly water and fat tends to float on water so I really wouldn't worry much about fat being in the broth. Strain it while it's still hot and then leave to cool before putting in the fridge.
    We make stock several times per week and they vary in colour, the amount of fat on top and the flavour. Homemade is great and you are getting the bones for free so keep on doing it.
     
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