Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPI) Increase All-cause Mortality And Heart Failure

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Feb 22, 2017.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    I posted a few studies before on the terrible side effects of PPI drugs. These drugs are perhaps the most prescribed class of drugs in the Western world for conditions like GERD, ulcers, or even to prepare for routine surgery. Recently, these drugs were approved even for use in newborns.
    Contrary to what your doctor may tell you, these drugs are far from benign and have potent systemic toxicities which so far include kidney failure, dementia, osteoporosis, depression, anxiety, and inhibited steroidogenesis. Now we can add fatal side effects to that list. The study below found that PPI use increased risk of all-cause mortality and heart failure. Given that they are commonly prescribed to people with heart conditions, the findings of this study are both quite ironic and sad at the same time. One of the primary mechanisms for these increased risks is the negative inotropic effects that PPI drugs were found to have. I bet at least part of that mechanism is due to the potent inhibition of progesterone synthesis by PPI, as progesterone is know to have positive chronotropic and inotropic effects. The loss of magnesium and calcium caused by PPI drugs probably also plays a role.

    Proton Pump Inhibitors Linked to Risk for Heart Failure, Death in CAD

    "...PPI use increased the risk for all-cause heart failure or death (HR, 5.713; P =.007), but not for acute ischemic events. "The present work shows that PPI use is an independent predictor of [heart failure] or death. Although there are no previous studies reporting this association, it is known that pantoprazole may exert negative inotropic effects on isolated myocardium from humans and rabbits," the researchers wrote. However, data regarding the effect of PPIs on myocardial function are limited and conflicting."
     
  2. Bokasso

    Bokasso Member

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    Hi Haidut,
    that's very interesting news, thanks! Does this mean, that Progesterone would help against the side effects of the PPI? And are there any better treatments for chronic inflammation of the stomach ('gastritis') instead of simply blocking the production of stomach acid? Something like Naringenin, Aspirin or Vitamin E? What would be an appropriate dose?
     
  3. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Progesterone should help. I think taurine would also be great given its role in preventing and even potentially treating heart failure. Finally, glycine should also be very helpful as it was shown to protect the stomach from inflammation and irritation due to things like alcohol and also block some of PPI's negative systemic effects.
     
  4. aguilaroja

    aguilaroja Member

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    First, even semi-thoughtful physicians who use these PPI’s do not always look for the minimum effective dose. Even people who remain concerned about following “doctor’s orders” can do well on a smaller amount of the PPI, if their doctor will work with them and either reduce the frequency or amount of the dose. I know several people relieved of some PPI side effects simply by working with their doctors to lower the dose.

    Second, PPI’s replaced the H2-blockers as treatment for gastric/peptic ulcer/heartburn/reflux.@haidut has discussed the special properties of one particular H2-blockers, famotidine. Famotidine is over-the-counter in many places. Famotidine can also be used to help people taper down from or replace large PPI amounts. Famotidine has some interesting metabolism-supporting properties:

    https://raypeatforum.com/community/...perties-of-the-h2-antagonist-famotidine.6845/

    Third, glycine, as mentioned by haidut, can be very soothing. Gelatin (with high glycine content) can also be soothing, providing it is easily digestible for the specific individual.

    Fourth, the usual Dr. Peat endotoxin-reducing fiber sources–grated raw carrot, cooked bamboo shoots, and cooked mushroom–support better bowel transit and reduce the “back pressure” that can aggravate stomach inflammation.
     
  5. Uncaged

    Uncaged Member

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    @haidut I just had a full workup, upper GI endoscopy and colonoscopy. They noted severe inflammation of the esophagus, and took a biopsy to ensure nothing cancerous. I am being put on pantoprazole 40mg, 1x daily for 1 month. Being privy to the issues of PPI's, this concerns me. Your thoughts?
     
  6. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I think something like famotidine would be much safer and the doctors should not object to it.
     
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