Pregnenolone For Blood Sugar Control

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Apr 2, 2016.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    It was recently discovered that the so-called TRM3 "receptors" in the pancreatic beta cells can be activated by pregnenolone sulfate (PS) at relatively low concentrations and result in insulin release. This makes pregnenolone a potential tool for keeping blood sugar levels normal and can also explain why some people experience nervoussness, cold extremeties, jitters, and headache from taking pregnenolone - i.e. it lowers your blood sugar.
    Given the similar properties of taurine and glycine, I think a combination of pregnenolone and one of these (or both) aino acids can be a very effective way to maintain proper glucose homeostasis.
    Btw, DHEA and DHEA-W had the same effect but were much less potent than PS.

    TRPM3 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    "...The product of this gene belongs to the family of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. TRP channels are cation-selective channels important for cellular calcium signaling and homeostasis. The protein encoded by this gene mediates calcium entry, and this entry is potentiated by calcium store depletion. Alternatively spliced transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been -identified.[2] TRPM3 was shown to be activated by the neurosteroid pregnenolone sulphate in pancreatic beta cell. The activation causes calcium influx and subsequent insulin release, therefore it is suggested that TRPM3 modulates glucose homeostasis."

    http://www.nature.com/ncb/journal/v10/n12/full/ncb1801.html
    "...We show here that TRPM3, a divalent-permeable cation channel, is rapidly and reversibly activated by extracellular pregnenolone sulphate, a neuroactive steroid. We show that pregnenolone sulphate activates endogenous TRPM3 channels in insulin-producing β cells. Application of pregnenolone sulphate led to a rapid calcium influx and enhanced insulin secretion from pancreatic islets. Our results establish that TRPM3 is an essential component of an ionotropic steroid receptor enabling unanticipated crosstalk between steroidal and insulin-signalling endocrine systems."

    "...We tested several other steroids, including substances with important genomic functions, and found that besides PS, only the closely related substances pregnenolone, DHEA and DHEA sulphate activated TRPM3 (Fig. 1c, e). We also searched for substances that may inhibit TRPM3 channels by testing substances that inhibit voltage-gated Ca2+ channels."
     
  2. skycop00

    skycop00 Member

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    Very cool study. Are those same receptors the ones that are damaged in Type 1 diabetics. Also, the clinic I work with sees a large reduction in insulin required for our clients that are on TRT. They all have malfunctioning hpta, and the testosterone and estrogen control makes a huge difference they report
     
  3. skycop00

    skycop00 Member

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    Additionally, I lost a very good friend 3 years ago at the young age if 37 to a diabetic coma at home. I had been begging him to get some bloodwork. When we got to his home his quest labs were on the table. His testosterone was 10! That's TEN on the quest lab....unreal..
     
  4. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Yes, I think so. The Nature study talks about that. Not sure if a type I diabetic will get a response from pregnenolone but it is worth a try with doctor's permission.
     
  5. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Unreal. Sorry about your loss.
    Btw, TRT is much safer with DHT instead of T. DHT is not only less dangerous due to lack of conversion into estrogen but is also brings down glucose numbers much faster than T. The beneficial effects of exercise are largely due to the stress causing elevations of DHEA (as a anti-dote to cortisol) and that DHEA metabolizes into DHT in peripheral tissues. It's the DHT that has all the benefits in males and T is just a prodrug for DHT as far as I am concerned. Speaking of which, DHEA in small doses is probably safer than T since it favors conversion into DHT through an alternative pathway that does not involve T. See below.
    DHEA provides same benefits effects as exercise by increasing DHT

    So, maybe worth bringing it up in the clinic to see what they think of switching to DHT.
     
  6. skycop00

    skycop00 Member

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    That's a great idea. I am attempting to quit TRT IN 2 weeks. Should I fail I will need to go back on testosterone, arimidex and hcg or need another option. I just don't know at 52 years old and 10 years on trt that my system will perform at a level I will be happy with!
     
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