Pranarupa

Isadora

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Excellent collection of articles at Pranarupa's blog:

Kosmos and Chaos, Liquid Crystalline Coherence, Carcinogenesis and Its Reversal

Pranayama, Carbon Dioxide, Mitochondria, Coherent Energy Flow, Regeneration and Individuation

Rainbow worms, Electrobiology, Carbon Dioxide and the Streaming Auto Evolving Life Process

Intestinal Cleansing, Endotoxin and Metabolic Energy

Character Armour, Heart Disease, Flexibility and Fluid Energy Fields

Serotonin, Inflammation, Depression, Mitochondria, Energy and Mad Love

Now that's someone whose books I'd be happy to buy -- and read, too! :) Beautiful explorations inspired by Ray Peat's thinking, but not only... And all references are in place, a rare occurrence in today's blogging!

I'd give him a special place among the authors listed here...
 
J

j.

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Isadora said:
And all references are in place, a rare occurrence in today's blogging!

What you need to understand is, people don't like being called Peatards.
 

Isadora

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What people need to understand is, they should grow up already! :)

A Proud Peatard
 

tara

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Parsifal said:
Ta.

This struck me:
Pranarupa said:
The extensive mitochondrial networks result from an increase in mitochondrial fusion, simpler mitochondrial structures from fission processes. A balance between fusion and fission is essential to cell function, imbalances in either direction can cause problems. Generally fission (fragmentation) of mitochondria results in a decrease in oxidative metabolism, increased fission is associated with cell division, dedifferentiation, apoptosis, lowered cytochrome oxidase (a fundamental respiratory enzyme), increased glycolysis, and a range of diseases including diabetes, Huntington’s, and cancer. Fission is increased by high glucose levels, perhaps as it allows for increased glycolysis and pyruvate uptake if sustained it seems likely to encourage the fermentation of pyruvate into lactate. Glucose deprivation enhances mitochondrial fusion.

Increased Mitochondrial fusion is associated with increased oxidative respiration, increased cytochrome oxidase, increased cell differentiation and specialisation. Denervation and disuse of tissues increases fission, use increases mitochondrial fusion
Seems to point to one way that chronic hyperglycemia can contribute to trouble, if I'm reading it right? And that the system benefits form at least occasional lower blood sugars?

Also, I think he is saying here that endurance exercise has effects that can benefit the mitochondria?
Pranarupa said:
PGC-1A increases mitochondrial mass and oxygen consumption, lowered mitochondrial function is involved in multiple diseases some of these may involve impaired PGC-1A including Huntington’s, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

PGC-1A can be increased by muscular activity especially endurance activity. PGC-1A both causes the conversion of type 2 fast white glycolytic fibres to type 1 slow red oxidative fibres, and is expressed at higher levels by type1 red oxidative fibres with increased mitochondrial density, extensive capillary supply and increased nerve supply (Lin et al. 2002). Type 1 fibres are those fibres that are involved in maintaining body posture as their constant activity requires intense respiratory support, type 2 fibres are capable of exerting more explosive force but they lack the fine motor control of type 1. An increased ratio of type 1 to type 2 fibres is present in humans compared to our primate relatives.

Can anyone comment on how these factors relate to Peat's writing?
 
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pranarupa

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In reference to endurance activity I'm thinking more of postural practice (yoga, qigong etc) other activities like standing and painting a canvas would also promote type 1 fibres. I think anything that intensely involves the cortex of the brain will promote type 1 muscle fibres and increase pgc1a, including various artistic activities as well as even just vigorous visualisation.

As for high glucose levels causing mitochondrial fission, this might be a problem in some one who has a low energy level with low mitochondrial mass andfunction. Someone with a higher energy level should be ok as muscle fibres dense in mitochondria will clear fatty acids from the blood and the brain and nervous system should be making use of available glucose.
 

tara

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pranarupa said:
post 102526 In reference to endurance activity I'm thinking more of postural practice (yoga, qigong etc) other activities like standing and painting a canvas would also promote type 1 fibres. I think anything that intensely involves the cortex of the brain will promote type 1 muscle fibres and increase pgc1a, including various artistic activities as well as even just vigorous visualisation.

OK, ta.

pranarupa said:
post 102526 As for high glucose levels causing mitochondrial fission, this might be a problem in some one who has a low energy level with low mitochondrial mass andfunction. Someone with a higher energy level should be ok as muscle fibres dense in mitochondria will clear fatty acids from the blood and the brain and nervous system should be making use of available glucose.

Someone who is using lots of sugar effectively will probably not have chronically high sugar levels, right? It's the one who is not using lots sugar well that is more likely to have chronic excessive high sugar levels?
This seems to be an area of significant uncertainty in how to approach it - lots of people, esp. ex low carbers or low calorie dieters seem to have some trouble adapting to higher sugar intake. But teh alternative, of continuing to restrict carbs, can just perpetuate the problems. I seems unclear whether a rapid switch to high carbs is a good way to promote recovery of sugar handling, or whether a slower transition is likely to be more successful. I wonder which method is most likeley to support the mitochondrai best. (Maybe the answer will vary from person to person.) This part of your article seemed related.

BTW, I've really appreciated reading the posts on your blog. Thanks.
 
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zooma

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pranarupa said:
As for high glucose levels causing mitochondrial fission, this might be a problem in some one who has a low energy level with low mitochondrial mass andfunction. Someone with a higher energy level should be ok as muscle fibres dense in mitochondria will clear fatty acids from the blood and the brain and nervous system should be making use of available glucose.

Is the increased mitochondrial density one of the advantages of favouring fat over sugar, or is it not as simple as that?
 

pranarupa

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I don't think micro-managing macronutrients is the most effective approach. I think engaging in activities which encourage the organism to reorganise at a higher energy level will give greater results than rearranging ratios of carbohydrate and fat.
Ideally the activities should be in some sense stimulating and also challenging. Function generates structure, activity stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis.

Though there are some substances that do seem especially beneficial, sodium butyrate appears to increase pgc1a and increase type 1 muscle fibres.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25559882
 
L

lollipop

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I don't think micro-managing macronutrients is the most effective approach. I think engaging in activities which encourage the organism to reorganise at a higher energy level will give greater results than rearranging ratios of carbohydrate and fat.
Ideally the activities should be in some sense stimulating and also challenging. Function generates structure, activity stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis.

Though there are some substances that do seem especially beneficial, sodium butyrate appears to increase pgc1a and increase type 1 muscle fibres.

Sodium butyrate epigenetically modulates high-fat diet-induced skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptation, obesity and insulin resistance through nuc... - PubMed - NCBI
This why yoga or the like helps so much. TOTALLY reorganizes the system at a higher energy level @pranarupa - my 30+ years of practice can attest to that :):
 
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Aren't yoga benefits a form of hormesis? The poses are pretty stressful to hold at first...
 
L

lollipop

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Aren't yoga benefits a form of hormesis? The poses are pretty stressful to hold at first...
Maybe for a brief time at the beginning @Such_Saturation - just after marrying started training my husband to his tiny bit of painful chagrin - lol - but quickly moved him past that point (within a week of daily, gradual).

Actually this concept always amazed me in yoga: the razor edge you walk on in yoga - too much and fall off, too little and nothing moves...there is a delicate balance...that reorganization into higher expression...
 

Makrosky

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I don't think micro-managing macronutrients is the most effective approach. I think engaging in activities which encourage the organism to reorganise at a higher energy level will give greater results than rearranging ratios of carbohydrate and fat.
Ideally the activities should be in some sense stimulating and also challenging. Function generates structure, activity stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis.

Though there are some substances that do seem especially beneficial, sodium butyrate appears to increase pgc1a and increase type 1 muscle fibres.

Sodium butyrate epigenetically modulates high-fat diet-induced skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptation, obesity and insulin resistance through nuc... - PubMed - NCBI
Yes I think we continually overestimate micromanagement and underestimate external world activities. I liked the way you puted it "Function generates structure".
 

jaa

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Aren't yoga benefits a form of hormesis? The poses are pretty stressful to hold at first...

So is reading if you've gone your whole life without it.

The reason I do yoga and similar exercises is to improve my posture and restore my natural range of motion and strength that has been decimated by modern life (i.e. sitting at a desk throughout school and work career). Yoga is like any strength training, but it targets postural muscles more than typical exercising. I've found the stronger those muscles get, the more naturally everything else just rests on my frame, and the more at ease I feel.

I'm with @lisaferraro, it's a bit of a delicate balance between too much stress and too little with regards to the poses. Too much and you risk over stretching, particularly when your strength is near failure. Too little, and you're wasting your time. I tend to err on the side of too much, a common problem in today's society.
 

Waynish

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What happened to this guy? Anyone know why he deleted his blog instead of at least leaving it online?
 

ken

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Here is the last iteration of his website.
 

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Kyle M

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He said that he got insecure about it or something and didn't want it up anymore.
 
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