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Persimmon (Kaki)

Mittir

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Feb 20, 2013
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2,034
I have never heard him say anything about persimmon.
Most fruits are better than grains and cooking certain fruits ( apple, banana etc )
make them less allergenic.General rule is to avoid unripe fruits that
are high in starch( apple,watermelon),
fruits high in allergenic compounds ( banana, kiwi, unripe papaya etc),
fruits high in serotonin ( banana, pineapple etc)
and fruits with small seeds that can not be avoided ( strawberry).
Fruits high in pectin can cause problem for people with bad balance of bacteria.
If persimmons does not cause any problem then there is no reason to stop.
Here is a list of fruits suggested by RP
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=588&hilit=safe+fruit
 

Shesjay

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Aug 24, 2013
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I was wondering this just yesterday after reading that the trees are easy to grow! They're quite nutrient dense, being very rich in vitamin A (not referring to beta carotene, though of course it has some of that too) and also good for manganese, vitamin B6, vitamin c, potassium and balanced calcium to phosphorus. So it sounds good. I just wonder if the high fibre content (14%) is okay. It's probably fine so long as you eat it soft and not crunchy.
 

paper_clips43

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Nov 13, 2013
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Location
Sedona Arizona
OK great to know! Thanks. I had one yesterday, for my first time every actually, and it was quite delicious and no bad side effects that I noticed so far. Thanks for the list Mittir! I noticed coconuts were not on the list. I do not see any problem with them though especially since they are full of saturated fat and potassium. They are high in fiber though...
 

loess

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Sep 22, 2013
Messages
322
I've read that persimmons have a fair amount of pectin in them, but they've been A-OK for me. Yep, very key to eat them when they are ripe. Also, peeling away the skin is probably a good idea.
 

Mittir

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Feb 20, 2013
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Persimmon has large amount of fiber and most of it is insoluble fiber, there is good amount of pectin too. Eating saturated fat with fiber ( soluble or insoluble) makes it safer and helps with killing bad bacteria. I never had problem with ripe persimmons.
This fruit is high in tannin, and there two varieties- astringent and non-astringent.
Wikipedia has some interesting info on tannin causing some kind of "foodball" in stomach

Unripened persimmons contain the soluble tannin shibuol, which, upon contact with a weak acid, polymerizes in the stomach and forms a gluey coagulum, a "foodball" or phytobezoar, that can affix with other stomach matter.[16] These phytobezoars are often very hard and almost woody in consistency. More than 85% of phytobezoars are caused by ingestion of unripened persimmons.[17] Persimmon bezoars (diospyrobezoars) often occur in epidemics in regions where the fruit is grown.[18][19]
 

Jenn

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Feb 24, 2013
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the amount of pectin in fruit is inversly proportional to its ripeness. both asian and american persimmons have a slim amount of high quality protein. american persimmons should only be eatenmushy,ripe. great for fruit leather,baking,etc.
 

Dutchie

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Nov 21, 2012
Messages
854
Shesjay said:
I was wondering this just yesterday after reading that the trees are easy to grow! They're quite nutrient dense, being very rich in vitamin A (not referring to beta carotene, though of course it has some of that too) and also good for manganese, vitamin B6, vitamin c, potassium and balanced calcium to phosphorus. So it sounds good. I just wonder if the high fibre content (14%) is okay. It's probably fine so long as you eat it soft and not crunchy.

Where did you find that info on nutrients?when i looked at this Cronometer thing,it mentioned only some Vit.C
Is there another online database thats better/more accurate regarding macro&micro amounts?:)
 

Shesjay

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Joined
Aug 24, 2013
Messages
43
@Dutchie Just googled around enough to find consistent data on more than one website! I don't ever know what site(s) to believe, though.
I'm a little confused, though, about the Japanese & American variations. Some sites seem to be referring to both, whereas others say that their nutrition is very different. Like, I just looked at the wikipedia page for persimmon and the 2 different types look quite different, for instance it says that the American variety is quite high in iron (19% RDI), and not the Japanese variety (1% RDI).
This site says 33% vitamin A: http://www.healthaliciousness.com/fruits/persimmon.php
This one 55%: http://www.harvestofthemonth.cdph.ca.go ... _edu_2.pdf
 

Dutchie

Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2012
Messages
854
Shesjay said:
@Dutchie Just googled around enough to find consistent data on more than one website! I don't ever know what site(s) to believe, though.
I'm a little confused, though, about the Japanese & American variations. Some sites seem to be referring to both, whereas others say that their nutrition is very different. Like, I just looked at the wikipedia page for persimmon and the 2 different types look quite different, for instance it says that the American variety is quite high in iron (19% RDI), and not the Japanese variety (1% RDI).
This site says 33% vitamin A: http://www.healthaliciousness.com/fruits/persimmon.php
This one 55%: http://www.harvestofthemonth.cdph.ca.go ... _edu_2.pdf

Thats what i actually find to be the problem with all tracking devices,they give out data as if all are created equal while nature doesnt abide by exact amounts of. Calories,nutrients etc.
 
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