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Peat + Vegan = Can It Be Done?

maryjanexx

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Joined
Feb 2, 2016
Messages
16
Hello all Peaters new and old!

I am very intrigued by the Peat diet, specifically its relation to endocrinology. I used to be a low carber and ended up very thin and fit, but severely dehydrated. Even though I was satisfied with my physique it was unsustainable.

After a few years of soul-searching I adopted a vegetarian and now vegan lifestyle. I think if I can't kill an animal myself I shouldn't be allowed to eat it, and I know the dairy industry is as horrendous as the meat industry.

So with my personal ethics in mind, is it possible to follow a Peat diet without incorporating meat or dairy? I could do shellfish and possibly become a little bit more "pescatarian".

I also would have to eliminate all phytoestrogens foods--which would pretty much be a lot of what I'm sustaining on now (powdered PB, vega protein powder, soy and cashew milk).

Any ideas and suggestions are sooooo appreciated! Thank you in advance :)

MJ
 

Brian

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Jun 8, 2014
Messages
505
If by "Peat diet" you mean maintain Oxidative metabolism then yeah, it probably is possible for a lot of people. I would supplement a good protein powder, pea and rice protein are good. The vegan claim that severe protein deficiency is rare is true, but at least 80 grams will make your body a lot more resilient to stress.

I would consider eating some quality shellfish, which many ethical vegans consider allowable and useful for filling in some of the common nutrients that are hard to get from plants.

I personally don't think there is a need to go 100% animal food free. If you decide to only eat from very ethical sources, most likely directly from a small farmer, you'll obviously eat a lot less animal food and won't be supporting conventional animal agricultural practices. I'm able to buy milk and eggs directly from a small family farmer that only has 5 cows and a small chicken flock that they graze. That makes a lot more sense to me than to rely on more specialized imported planted foods and supplements.
 
Last edited:

Zachs

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Nov 8, 2014
Messages
593
A true Peat diet, no. But a vegan diet that offers health and follows the majority of Peats dietary principles, yes!

The big rule #1, no pufa. So no nuts, seeds, avocados or oil besides coconut.

Other than that, things to avoid would be a lot of raw vegetables, soy and other legumes.

Your diet would center around a few staples, mainly potatoes and sweet potatoes, fruit and sugar, coconut and rice. Other things to add would be well cooked greens, mushrooms, other roots/tubers/gourds and corn flour.

Other things that you could add that are not Peat friendly are beans and non fortified grains and olives/olive oil.

As a vegan/vegetarian for ethical reasons, I believe it is possible to eat honey, bivalves, dairy and eggs ethically if you source them. If you can find a local supply of goat milk that treats their animals well, I don't see the problem drinking it. Cows it's a bit more difficult because male cows will for sure go to slaughter (most goats will too but not all farms do) but if the male cows are allowed to be grass fed free range for a few years, that's a pretty decent life. Eggs that are not fertilized by a rooster are basically just chicken periods. Find a local supplier that treats their chickens well. Bivalves have no central nervous system so some find it easier to eat them. I'm not one but if I lived somewhere tropical I might change my mind. Honey of course is fine, some beekeepers kill their hives every year to collect honey. Find one that doesnt.
 

maryjanexx

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Thread starter
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Feb 2, 2016
Messages
16
If by "Peat diet" you mean maintain Oxidative metabolism then yeah, it probably is possible for a lot of people. I would supplement a good protein powder, pea and rice protein are good. The vegan claim that severe protein deficiency is rare is true, but at least 80 grams will make your body a lot more resilient to stress.

I would consider eating some quality shellfish, which many ethical vegans consider allowable and useful for filling in some of the common nutrients that are hard to get from plants.

I personally don't think there is a need to go 100% animal food free. If you decide to only eat from very ethical sources, most likely directly from a small farmer, you'll obviously eat a lot less animal food and won't be supporting conventional agricultural practices. I'm able to buy milk and eggs directly from a small family farmer that only has 5 cows and a small chicken flock that they graze. That makes a lot more sense to me than to rely on more specialized imported planted foods and supplements.

Totally agree thank you for that.
Let me bounce something else off you, which I have posted in another older Peat/Vegan thread as well.

To get adequate protein, would a high-quality (ehmm expensive as hell) protein powder be an acceptable source?

I currently have two tubs of Vega Sport Protein powder.

44mg of about 20 amino acids

Ingredients:
Pea protein, Pumpkin seed protein, Organic sunflower seed protein, Alfalfa protein, Tart cherry, Probiotics (Bacillus coagulans [provides 1 billion cfu/serving]), Bromelain, Turmeric extract, Black Pepper extract. Contains less than 2% of: Strawberry powder, Apple powder, Beetroot powder (for color), Sea salt, Natural vanilla flavor, Natural berry flavor, Citric acid, Stevia extract, Xanthan gum.

**3g fat .5g sat fat. By separating the protein from most of the PUFA does that stop hormone havoc?
 

Brian

Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2014
Messages
505
Totally agree thank you for that.
Let me bounce something else off you, which I have posted in another older Peat/Vegan thread as well.

To get adequate protein, would a high-quality (ehmm expensive as hell) protein powder be an acceptable source?

I currently have two tubs of Vega Sport Protein powder.

44mg of about 20 amino acids

Ingredients:
Pea protein, Pumpkin seed protein, Organic sunflower seed protein, Alfalfa protein, Tart cherry, Probiotics (Bacillus coagulans [provides 1 billion cfu/serving]), Bromelain, Turmeric extract, Black Pepper extract. Contains less than 2% of: Strawberry powder, Apple powder, Beetroot powder (for color), Sea salt, Natural vanilla flavor, Natural berry flavor, Citric acid, Stevia extract, Xanthan gum.

I remember looking into Vega when I tried going vegan a few years a go. I don't think it's anything special and probably contains more PUFA and gut irritants than is ideal. I would go with a simple rice and pea protein supplement mixed into a smoothie or recipe. Also a potato meal per day will help a lot with providing high quality protein.
 

maryjanexx

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Thread starter
Joined
Feb 2, 2016
Messages
16
A true Peat diet, no. But a vegan diet that offers health and follows the majority of Peats dietary principles, yes!

The big rule #1, no pufa. So no nuts, seeds, avocados or oil besides coconut.

Other than that, things to avoid would be a lot of raw vegetables, soy and other legumes.

Your diet would center around a few staples, mainly potatoes and sweet potatoes, fruit and sugar, coconut and rice. Other things to add would be well cooked greens, mushrooms, other roots/tubers/gourds and corn flour.

Other things that you could add that are not Peat friendly are beans and non fortified grains and olives/olive oil.

As a vegan/vegetarian for ethical reasons, I believe it is possible to eat honey, bivalves, dairy and eggs ethically if you source them. If you can find a local supply of goat milk that treats their animals well, I don't see the problem drinking it. Cows it's a bit more difficult because male cows will for sure go to slaughter (most goats will too but not all farms do) but if the male cows are allowed to be grass fed free range for a few years, that's a pretty decent life. Eggs that are not fertilized by a rooster are basically just chicken periods. Find a local supplier that treats their chickens well. Bivalves have no central nervous system so some find it easier to eat them. I'm not one but if I lived somewhere tropical I might change my mind. Honey of course is fine, some beekeepers kill their hives every year to collect honey. Find one that doesnt.

Thank you. Potatoes potatoes potatoes is basically my conclusion reading various related threads.

Starches may equate weight gain, I don't want to put on any more pounds preferably, any insight?
 

maryjanexx

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Feb 2, 2016
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I remember looking into Vega when I tried going vegan a few years a go. I don't think it's anything special and probably contains more PUFA and gut irritants than is ideal. I would go with a simple rice and pea protein supplement mixed into a smoothie or recipe. Also a potato meal per day will help a lot with providing high quality protein.
Potatoes. Check haha.
Plain protein, sounds like a challenge to make palatable.
 

Zachs

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Nov 8, 2014
Messages
593
Fat makes you fat. Eating a diet of all starches will make you lean as hell. Best bet is to eat potatoes, rice, fruit, mushrooms and coconut if you want to lose weight.
 

maryjanexx

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Feb 2, 2016
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Fat makes you fat. Eating a diet of all starches will make you lean as hell. Best bet is to eat potatoes, rice, fruit, mushrooms and coconut if you want to lose weight.
For some reason I thought Danny Roddy said Mr. Peat didn't endorse rice?
 

thegiantess

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Nov 16, 2015
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My understanding is that Peat would classify white rice and other refined starches as not the most ideal, but far better than whole grain starches. The idea is to provide the body with the most easily digested foods. Potatoes are a better starch option bc they come with a lot of nutrients. Any starch you choose should be eaten with some fat to delay the insulin spike and also to keep starch molecules from getting into the blood (peat has mentioned this many times and while I don't really understand why it happens, I think it is something to keep in mind) So. White rice, white bread (sourdough white bread even better), white potatoes.
 

maryjanexx

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Feb 2, 2016
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My understanding is that Peat would classify white rice and other refined starches as not the most ideal, but far better than whole grain starches. The idea is to provide the body with the most easily digested foods. Potatoes are a better starch option bc they come with a lot of nutrients. Any starch you choose should be eaten with some fat to delay the insulin spike and also to keep starch molecules from getting into the blood (peat has mentioned this many times and while I don't really understand why it happens, I think it is something to keep in mind) So. White rice, white bread (sourdough white bread even better), white potatoes.
Ok. Last question, should I always be trying to combine a starch/sugar with a protein/fat for insulin purposes? Or is that not necessary. (Usually I just do it because it tastes good, but I don't really know what pears or cherries could be combined with.)
 

thegiantess

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Nov 16, 2015
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Meh. Idk about combining with fruit. I think it stands on its own pretty well. As Peat says, the fructose and potassium in fruit means that less insulin is needed, so that should mean its fine just to eat fruit by itself. Starches, yes.
 

tara

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Mar 29, 2014
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Meh. Idk about combining with fruit. I think it stands on its own pretty well. As Peat says, the fructose and potassium in fruit means that less insulin is needed, so that should mean its fine just to eat fruit by itself. Starches, yes.
That's how I read Peat too.
 

dookie

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May 5, 2015
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It depends on you and your body.

I get something that resembles "serotonin syndrome" when I eat a single banana; sweating, hair loss, agitation, bloating, etc. I have allergic reactions to most vegetables and fruits. Without meats and cheeses, I would be extremely limited in my food choices.

Also eating out as a vegan with peat principles would probably very difficult. Probably boiled rice and boiled potatoes would be your best safe options at restaurants, although the rice in USA might be "enriched", which is not good.
 

Vita3

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Aug 30, 2012
Messages
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Sorry but if you will avoid a lot vegans food you will end up with very little food left.

You can still eat legumes or other no "peaty food" the main thing is avoid PUFA and even avocado,cashew and macadamia nuts once in a while it is not that bad.
 

Vita3

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Joined
Aug 30, 2012
Messages
50
Totally agree thank you for that.
Let me bounce something else off you, which I have posted in another older Peat/Vegan thread as well.

To get adequate protein, would a high-quality (ehmm expensive as hell) protein powder be an acceptable source?

I currently have two tubs of Vega Sport Protein powder.

44mg of about 20 amino acids

Ingredients:
Pea protein, Pumpkin seed protein, Organic sunflower seed protein, Alfalfa protein, Tart cherry, Probiotics (Bacillus coagulans [provides 1 billion cfu/serving]), Bromelain, Turmeric extract, Black Pepper extract. Contains less than 2% of: Strawberry powder, Apple powder, Beetroot powder (for color), Sea salt, Natural vanilla flavor, Natural berry flavor, Citric acid, Stevia extract, Xanthan gum.

**3g fat .5g sat fat. By separating the protein from most of the PUFA does that stop hormone havoc?

I can get 100% pea and rice powder.
 

tara

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Mar 29, 2014
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I am very intrigued by the Peat diet
Which one would that be? :)

Peat has said he has wanted to test various fruits to find out which keto acids they contain, but regulations don't allow him to get the chemicals he needs to do the testing. In the absence of knowledge about exactly which protein needs you can cover with which fruit, it may be good to eat a wide variety. And lots of potatoes, as you say.
Peat usually recommends 80-100g protein for people with low thyroid function, and more if euthyroid.
I like the idea of including some shell fish and eggs from well-cared for hens, and maybe some cod or similar and some well-treated ruminant milk if you would be OK with that, to help get protein and some of the other things that may be harder to get enough of from plants.
Also check whether you are getting enough calcium - eggshell or oystershell are possible sources if your veges don't give you enough.
Salt to taste.
Plenty of calories.

Watch the effects and adjust/reconsider if it's not working for you.
 

maryjanexx

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Feb 2, 2016
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Well according to my fitness pal, I only track once in a while out of curiousity, I get the recommended amounts and exceed most (it doesn't increase amounts to meet activity). Very low PUFA, way exceed all vitamins shown--C, E, A. The only thing I don't get is the recommended sodium, but I don't track hot sauce so I think I've probably got it covered there :) Potatoes are a powerhouse I've realized, including calorie wise haha.
 

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