Peat, Peating, And Creativity

Discussion in 'Mind, Sleep, Stress' started by narouz, Nov 11, 2012.

  1. narouz

    narouz Member

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    This thread started elsewhere, so I'm making a new thread for it.
    It began by my asking "peatarian" about writer's block:

     
  2. OP
    narouz

    narouz Member

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  3. Ray-Z

    Ray-Z Member

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    Great topic, Narouz.
     
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    narouz

    narouz Member

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    Danny Roddy had this up on his website today,
    and I noticed the theme of brain cell destruction, desensitization, and atrophy,
    all linked back to our old pal estrogen.

    So, while this may not directly scream "creativity,'
    I would think that brains cell health is probably a good foundation for creativity.
    Just pointing out that many of the same Peat principles
    we are familiar with in discussion of the biological bases of health
    also apply to the more complex and elusive area we call creativity.
     
  5. Ray-Z

    Ray-Z Member

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    I'm neither the most creative guy around nor the best read on this topic, but I want to throw out a few ideas that I find helpful. I do not claim that Ray Peat agrees with anything I'm about to say.

    As mentioned in the thread on drawing, Betty Edwards wrote a book titled Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, in which she relates art and creativity to what was, at the time she wrote, current neuroscience. I read the book years ago, so you have my apologies if I mischaracterize it.

    Edwards argues that we can distinguish two modes of human consciousness.

    One mode is an analytical mode, in which we think with ideas and concepts, i.e. abstractions. The analytical mode uses language, symbols, and rules of logic or syntax. This mode mechanically simplifies, categorizes, and evaluates our experience; it is fundamentally "reductionist." In the analytical mode, we judge constantly and can be harshly critical of ourselves or our experiences. In this mode, we are aware of the passage of time and can reflect on the past or future, both of which can be great sources of stress.

    The other mode is an artistic or perceptual mode in which we perceive without judgment or analysis. In this mode, the mind makes no attempt to impose order or consistency on our experience; it is simply aware. The artistic or perceptual mode makes no use of language, concepts, or rules of any sort. This mode is holistic rather than reductionist. Intuition arises in this mode as direct experience of reality. While the analytical mode is critical, the artistic mode is accepting of all our experience. In the artistic mode, we focus on the present moment and lose contact with notions of time. In short, Edwards describes the mind in its artistic mode as calm, relaxed (but energetic), non-verbal, intuitive, focused on the present, and above all, aware.

    Modern people living in conditions of chronic stress, immersed in language, and pursuing occupations that require analytical thinking spend much of their time in the analytical mode and have difficulty moving to the artistic mode -- hence Edwards' emphasis on how to access this mode.

    What I find so interesting about Edwards' description of the artistic mode is that it is very close to a seasoned meditator's description of the mind in deep meditation: calm, deeply aware, focused on the present moment, non-verbal, non-conceptual, non-judgmental, accepting. (Of course, there are lots of other ways to enter into meditative states besides meditation -- martial arts, tennis, yoga, gardening, hiking, and so forth.)

    In the thread on meditation and CO2, several of us argued that deeply meditative states are also states of high oxidative metabolism and low stress. These states are like the energized state of a cell as described by Ray Peat -- highly energetic, yet also relaxed. I won't rehash the argument, but will make use of it here.

    If Edwards' artistic, creative mode is indeed a kind of meditative state, and if meditative states are states of high oxidative metabolism, then creativity and CO2 are good friends. I would therefore expect all the various methods of Peating to enhance creativity over the long term, and I would expect artistic activities to help stressed, sick, hypothyroid people to recover (to the extent they can engage in such activities without frustration).

    This connection between Peating and creativity is intuitively plausible: What could be more conducive to creativity than a state of low stress and ample resources with which to perceive and respond flexibly to one's environment?

    OK, time for me to shut mah big mouf. :mrgreen:
     
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    narouz

    narouz Member

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    Very interesting stuff there, RayZ.
    Thanks.
     
  7. Rachel

    Rachel Member

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    :dancenanner Great post, Ray-Z.
     
  8. Ray-Z

    Ray-Z Member

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    Thank you, narouz and Rachel.

    The dancing banana never fails to brighten my day! :mrgreen:
     
  9. kiran

    kiran Member

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    For me, I find that driving gets me into a meditative state. It's too bad it's also very tiring, and gas is so expensive.
     
  10. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Ray-Z, excellent post! That all ties into what I am looking into now, getting to that meditative, right brain state.

    Kiran, I have found the same thing to. I just told a friend a couple days ago that my soul is the happiest when I am driving. :lol: I truly really feel happy when driving, deep down.
     
  11. OP
    narouz

    narouz Member

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    I agree about the driving.
    I've never hated long drives like most people I know.
    I guess you could think that attention to the road
    substitutes for attention to breath....
     
  12. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Long drives are the best! If you drive right, you should be highly aware. This high awareness gets you to that meditative type state and makes me smile. :mrgreen:
     
  13. Ray-Z

    Ray-Z Member

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    Thank you, Charlie. Appreciate the encouragement.

    It can be challenging to find time for the right brain state. When we are in the analytical mode, our minds can always find plenty of "busy work," anxieties, and stories to preoccupy us and keep us out of the artistic/perceptual mode. I find that keeping my computer, phone, and TV off as much as possible clears a little bit of space for the perceptual mode. And of course, you're right that with the right attitude, everyday tasks like driving can help us access that mode.
     
  14. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Did my first sketches today, well, if you can even call them that. :lol:
     
  15. OP
    narouz

    narouz Member

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    Doesn't count without a picture. :D
     
  16. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Ha! Doesn't count then! :neener
     
  17. Ray-Z

    Ray-Z Member

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    Way to go, Charlie! :mrgreen:
     
  18. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Thanks Ray-Z. I actually quite enjoyed "creating" something. Look forward to doing it again.
     
  19. kettlebell

    kettlebell Member

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    Hey Charlie,

    Are you sketching from memory or from an object in front of you and does this make a difference in regards to which parts of brain you are using?

    My main query is does it have to be a "Made up" sketch/painting for it to have the beneficial effects we are going for or will painting an object/scene have the same beneficial effects considering you are visualising that scene in your mind while trying to get it onto the canvas/paper?
     
  20. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Kettlebell, I havent received the book yet, so I am not sure about the correct way to do it. I found a site online that has a couple of practice lessons that are in the book, so I will be starting those soon. All I did last night, was find some simple sketches online, then tried to do them for myself. I did this to get an idea on how much improvement I get in the future, more of a baseline per say.

    Here is one of the exercises:

    http://www.learn-to-draw-right.com/righ ... brain.html
     
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