Peaches Are Antithyroid?

juanitacarlos

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She lists a lot of foods!

African cassava
Babassu (a palm-tree coconut fruit found in Brazil and Africa)
Bok choy
Broccoli
Broccolini
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Chinese Broccoli
Collards
Daikon
Kale
Kohlrabi
Millet
Mustard
Peaches
Peanuts
Pine nuts
Radishes
Red Radish
Rutabaga
Spinach
Strawberries
Turnips
Watercress

Looks like a complete list of health foods you would find recommended by any nutritionist. Scary...
 

4peatssake

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j. said:

:lol: This is the same article I just linked to on your other thread about the wiki article on caffeine being antithyroid and this article is the one that lists oranges, milk, liver, grapes and oysters as having "questionable" anti-thyroid effect.

I wonder what Ray Peat thinks of this article written by an MD? I don't think it's an actual study but rather an article written in July-Aug. 1957 by an MD named Monte A. Greer.

Seems Dr. Greer is from Ray's neck of the woods.

Dr. Monte Greer, MD
Diabetes, Metabolism & Endocrinology
Male, Age 90, Graduated 1947, Stanford University
Portland, OR

Google search on both names together turned up nuthin'
 

4peatssake

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Pretty much the only fresh fruits I can get locally are peaches (and cherries!), so I'm gonna take a chance this summer that I'll tolerate them both, provided I can get organic ones. Maybe I'll even can some peaches if I get the urge to try something new. ;)

Too delish at least not to try!! :)

This is from the diet summary attributed to Ray, given to "someone" in 2005

Other fruits like peaches, plums apples, etc should only be eaten if organic
and tree-ripened;otherwise they have very powerful toxins (if unripe or shelf-ripened)
that can cause gut damage. Melons, cherries, and citrus are the best fruits.
 

Asimov

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I guess she's attributing that to thiocyanate contained in the peaches. Most studies indicate that thiocyanate is only thyroid-suppressive when paired with selenium deficiency. Take a selenium supplement and the problem is likely solved. The same can be said of many supposed "thyroid-suppressive" foods.
 

Jenn

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Peaches are awesome and have skeletal(I know there's a proper word for it, just can't think of it right now) protein (protein that's not officially protein, but the body can convert it.) I would ignore the article.
 

gabriel79

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Remember that what´s important is the net effect of a food over thyroid. Potatoes may have some goitrogen substance but a lot of other protecting factors (proteins, carbs, minerals, etc) with a net result being pro-thyroid. That list probably states that those foods contain some goitrogenic substance.
 

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j.

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Regarding peaches, I think they can be anti-thyroid in excess if they're not very ripe, just because I felt with more food sensitivities after about 3 months of using peaches as my main fruit every day, when I wasn't getting good oranges.
 

juanitacarlos

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4peatssake said:
Other fruits like peaches, plums apples, etc should only be eaten if organic
and tree-ripened;otherwise they have very powerful toxins (if unripe or shelf-ripened)
that can cause gut damage. Melons, cherries, and citrus are the best fruits.

That's interesting. I've always loved fruits, and growing up in the tropics I had access to a variety of fresh fruits, but always found stone fruits inedible. They tasted noxious to me.
 

Jenn

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ttramone said:
4peatssake said:
Other fruits like peaches, plums apples, etc should only be eaten if organic
and tree-ripened;otherwise they have very powerful toxins (if unripe or shelf-ripened)
that can cause gut damage. Melons, cherries, and citrus are the best fruits.

That's interesting. I've always loved fruits, and growing up in the tropics I had access to a variety of fresh fruits, but always found stone fruits inedible. They tasted noxious to me.

I have had similar experiences with tropical fruit, probably because they are not good quality here. I imagine under ripe anything is not good. The thing is, if you've only had store bought fruit, you don't even know what ripe is. Yeah, planting my blueberries plants today, so I can get RIPE berries. :cool:
 

juanitacarlos

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Jenn said:
ttramone said:
4peatssake said:
Other fruits like peaches, plums apples, etc should only be eaten if organic
and tree-ripened;otherwise they have very powerful toxins (if unripe or shelf-ripened)
that can cause gut damage. Melons, cherries, and citrus are the best fruits.

That's interesting. I've always loved fruits, and growing up in the tropics I had access to a variety of fresh fruits, but always found stone fruits inedible. They tasted noxious to me.

I have had similar experiences with tropical fruit, probably because they are not good quality here. I imagine under ripe anything is not good. The thing is, if you've only had store bought fruit, you don't even know what ripe is. Yeah, planting my blueberries plants today, so I can get RIPE berries. :cool:

I think unripe bananas are one of the worst things I've tasted. It actually feels like you should not be eating them. I think we've lost that ability to know good from bad sometimes!
 
J

j.

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Peaches are mildly goitrogenic. However, if one eats them every day, I think it might be a good idea to heat them for a bit to deactivate the goitrogens. But what is the ideal amount of time, and temperature to steam them, or boil them? Are canned or fresh peaches more goitrogenic? I'm not sure these questions have been researched, but if you know the answers please let us know.
 

Rayser

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j. - every fruit is anti-thyroid (and many other things) when it's not ripe.
But I have been eating peaches and Ray Peat never mentioned any negative effects.
I have to admit I've never heard that they did anything for the bones, though ...?
 
J

j.

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The thing is I don't know if canned peaches are ripe. I seem to have noticed anti-thyroid effects when it was my main fruit for months. It isn't anymore, but I'd like to know anyway if there is an ideal way to heat them to minimize the goitrogens for extra precaution.

I think peaches probably stand out from other fruits as it's one of the only fruits that are often mentioned as goitrogenic.
 

Rayser

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I know the problem and have noticed the same effect about canned mangos.
I think that the metal from the cans is to some degree dissolved and you eat it with the fruit.
Probably the problem is not the peaches but the cans.
But I am sure you are right about canned fruit: It's probably not high quality because there is no way for the customer to know.
 

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