1. Cocoa Butter - Organic & Fair Trade Certified
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. **NEW** BL11 - Orange, Red & Infrared Therapy Body Light
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Charcoal Soap - For Deep Cleansing
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Orange & Red Light Therapy Device - LGS1
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  5. Organic Cocoa Powder
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  6. Metabasoap - Handcrafted Soap
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  7. Cascara Sagrada Powder From Farmalabor In Italy
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  8. **NEW Mini Body Light** MBL1 - Orange & Red Light Therapy Mini Body Light
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice

Oral Exposure To The Free Amino Acid Glycine Inhibits The Acute Allergic Response In A Model Of Cow'

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by LeeLemonoil, Mar 27, 2019.

  1. LeeLemonoil

    LeeLemonoil Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2016
    Messages:
    862
    Gender:
    Male
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0271531718300095

    Abstract

    The conditionally essential amino acid glycine functions as inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. Moreover, it has been shown to act as an anti-inflammatory compound in animal models of ischemic perfusion, post-operative inflammation, periodontal disease, arthritis and obesity. Glycine acts by binding to a glycine-gated chloride channel, which has been demonstrated on neurons and immune cells, including macrophages, polymorphonuclear neutrophils and lymphocytes. The present study aims to evaluate the effect of glycine on allergy development in a cow's milk allergy model. To this end, C3H/HeOuJ female mice were supplemented with glycine by oral gavage (50 or 100 mg/mouse) 4 hours prior to sensitization with cow's milk whey protein, using cholera toxin as adjuvant. Acute allergic skin responses and anaphylaxis were assessed after intradermal allergen challenge in the ears. Mouse mast cell protease-1 (mMCP-1) and whey specific IgE levels were detected in blood collected 30 minutes after an oral allergen challenge. Jejunum was dissected and evaluated for the presence of mMCP-1-positive cells by immunohistochemistry. Intake of glycine significantly inhibited allergy development in a concentration dependent manner as indicated by a reduction in; acute allergic skin response, anaphylaxis, serum mMCP-1 and serum levels of whey specific IgE. In addition, in-vitro experiments using rat basophilic leukemia cells (RBL), showed that free glycine inhibited cytokine release but not cellular degranulation. These findings support the hypothesis that the onset of cow's milk allergy is prevented by the oral intake of the amino acid glycine. An adequate intake of glycine might be important in the improvement of tolerance against whey allergy or protection against (whey-induced) allergy development.
     
  2. OP
    LeeLemonoil

    LeeLemonoil Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2016
    Messages:
    862
    Gender:
    Male
    Vitamin A also attenuates the allerigic effects, cant find the study but i posted it here. Maybe high Glycine and Retinol availability were a factor in evolution of milk-tolerance.
     
  3. Mossy

    Mossy Member

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2017
    Messages:
    774
    Gender:
    Male
    It's good to know this, as a remedy for allergic reactions. I find that supplementing with the isolated amino acid glycine makes me very lethargic and flat. It may be best to get this by way of gelatin--if that would work.
     
  4. Homo Consumericus

    Homo Consumericus Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2018
    Messages:
    38
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Possibly, although you'd need a bit more since gelatin is 35%-40% glycine for bovine and porcine varieties.

    4 grams of glycine even when taken with 40 grams of protein + some fruit made me heavily stoned for half a day. Jello made with 300ml orange juice and 10g porcine gelatin eaten with 40 grams of protein + some fruit also sedated me, although far less aggressively and only until the afternoon, when eaten in the morning. The same amount of jello eaten in the evening was effective in setting the mood for bed.
     
  5. Mossy

    Mossy Member

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2017
    Messages:
    774
    Gender:
    Male
    Yes, that has been my experience as well, with supplemental glycine—totally wipes me out—whereas gelatin sedates, but not like the supplement. What about pork rinds? Looks like a single 14g serving (9 grams total protein) would have about 1670mg glycine. I know some don’t like the fat content, but it’s primarily saturated.
     
  6. Homo Consumericus

    Homo Consumericus Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2018
    Messages:
    38
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    In principle I'm a fan of any high gelatin animal part; however, I shy away from pork, partly ever since I read this article-- http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2012/02/the-trouble-with-pork-part-3-pathogens/-- and partly for lack of a good marinade recipe. I only use porcine gelatin until my shipment of bovine gelatin arrives because supermarkets offer no alternative.

    Big saturated fat fan, especially from ruminant animals.

    Not sure how much gelatin is in ground beef, goat, and lamb but I rotate those 6x/week and it never gets old.
     
Loading...