One Radio Network - January 2020

Discussion in 'Interviews' started by lampofred, Jan 20, 2020.

  1. lampofred

    lampofred Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,668
    Gender:
    Male
  2. Inaut

    Inaut Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2017
    Messages:
    1,591
    Gender:
    Male
    :) thanks mang
     
  3. OP
    lampofred

    lampofred Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,668
    Gender:
    Male
    Apparently he did an interview yesterday on philosophy, does anyone know where to find this?
     
  4. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2015
    Messages:
    7,480
  5. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    11,302
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    USA
    Aaaah yeeeah. Thank you sir. :hattip
     
  6. Noodlz2

    Noodlz2 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2019
    Messages:
    139
    Bump, in case anyone knows or can ask Peat.
     
  7. yoshiesque

    yoshiesque Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2014
    Messages:
    365
    here it is



    if link dont work go on youtube and search
    "Dr. Raymond Peat on Cosmology and Transforming Society | Cooperation Paradigm"
     
  8. OP
    lampofred

    lampofred Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,668
    Gender:
    Male
    Thank you!
     
  9. Mito

    Mito Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2016
    Messages:
    1,514
    Has anybody used an oximeter to gauge carbon dioxide production like Ray does?
     
  10. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2015
    Messages:
    7,480
    sure. The numbers he gives are really low. I’ve seldom reached anything close.
     
  11. Mito

    Mito Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2016
    Messages:
    1,514
    He thinks 93-95% is good
     
  12. yerrag

    yerrag Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2016
    Messages:
    5,074
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Manila
    Ray Peat said what makes perfect sense, that good blood sugar regulation is need for good thyroid health. The liver needs a steady supply of blood sugar to be able to convert T4 to T3.

    This is one interview where Ray Peat talks a lot about good blood sugar regulation, something which I felt has been implicit in his writings and interviews. After all, he has spoken strongly agsinst PUFAs, as PUFAs block the absorption by tissues of sugar. And with that, an increase in blood sugar would result.

    But in this interview, he had become more explicit in emphasizing blood sugar regulation. Listen to the interview. He talks blood sugar regulation being able to improve blood circulation efficiency, as seen is lowered blood pressure and lowered pulse pressure. He talks about better blood sugar regulation leading to lowered stress, as seen in lowered cortisol and adrenaline.
     
  13. yerrag

    yerrag Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2016
    Messages:
    5,074
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Manila
    Another point that's gold is Peat saying something that corrects the impression I had about temperature and heart rate - that a healthy metabolism means having a consistent temperature and heart rate throughout the day and night. I got this impression because I would see people in our forum being proud about their ability to have a consistent temperature and heart rate, that even at night, while asleep, the same temperature and heart rate would be maintained as during the day.

    This has made me wonder and fret about my temps and heart rate being relatively low during sleep hours.

    In this interview, Ray Peat says that high temps and pulse even at night is a sign of stress.

    Now, I fee better knowing there's nothing wrong with my have a lower temperature and pulse at night.
     
  14. Lizb

    Lizb Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2017
    Messages:
    151
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    I feel somewhat confused about this.

    I do know that 100% reading on a finger monitor just means there's lots of oxygen in the cell, but can't get enough out without enough co2.

    (no co2 = no o2).

    So, maybe it's reasonable to say that a lower reading would be better - I can see that.

    But, if you have compromised, damaged lungs, you clearly have a o2 and co2 supply problem, and often display the lower results on the finger monitor.

    Additionally, recently a Buteyko practitioner told me that when I have a chest infection and my control pause goes up, the reason for that would be that my body is directing all the co2 to the lungs to do a repair job.

    Can anyone unpack that so I can have clear thought on the matter please?

    By the way how do you tag someone?
     
  15. yerrag

    yerrag Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2016
    Messages:
    5,074
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Manila
    It is confusing at the start, at least that was the case for me. And this is why most nurses (and perhaps doctors as well) view high spO2 as a very good thing. After all, they use oxygen tanks (with no CO2) to assist patients with breathing (mixed with atmospheric air by the way). With this method, the oxygen saturation has no way to go but up, which seemingly validates (a case of cognitive dissonance) the approach of our hospitals and clinics, however wrong the approach is.

    This is equivalent to a bus that picks up 100 passengers in New York City headed to Buffalo. When it arrives in Buffalo, none of the passenger alight because the windows and doors are shut. This means 100 passengers are locked in the bus, and 0 passengers actually set foot in Buffalo.

    If you see the passengers as oxygen, then you get the idea.

    The 100% doesn't refer to oxygen in the cell, it refers to the oxygen in blood that is intended to get into the cells of the bodily tissues. But if you meant the red blood cell, you are correct though.

    It is, as that means oxygen is being released by the red blood cells to the cells in the body. As the red blood cell releases oxygen, less oxygen is available in the red blood cell, and this is reflected in lower oximeter readings.

    The alveolar sacs in the lungs would lose its ability to efficiently release CO2 from blood and absorb O2 in blood. Too much CO2 left in the blood leads to hyperventilation, as the body keeps attempting to release CO2 in order to lower blood acidity. Too little O2 absorbed in the blood shows as low oximeter reading. In the case of mercury toxicity, oxygen-carrying hemoglobin in the red blood cell would carry less oxygen, and this would also lead to hypoxemia, or low oxygen transport in blood.

    Tagging someone - @Lizb
     
Loading...
Similar Threads - Radio Network January
  1. Lejeboca
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    1,138
  2. lampofred
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    1,579
  3. lampofred
    Replies:
    36
    Views:
    3,960
  4. lampofred
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    767
  5. lampofred
    Replies:
    96
    Views:
    6,059